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June 26, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 I L Y\

' i/ " L 1 < 1 1

R OF THE SUMMER
'Y OF MICHIGAN. ,
Saturday Afternoons.
ng; Maynard Street.
ditorial, 2414.
D2 :oo o'clock daily, except
co to 2 :oo o'clock
day.
ds, if signed, the signatures
t, but as an evidence of
blished in The Wolverine
r mailed to the office.e
re no consideration. No
writer encloses postage.
indors the sentiments ex-

cials, it has been made possible to continue this cus-
tom. The Union has provided for the carving of
names in the Tap room tops, and to a certain extent
there has'been a response. But it is not what it
should be. Every s'enior in the University should
have.his name in one of the Union tables ; each man
should see to it that he has done his part to carry
on the tradition.
There are still a number of seniors in the city.
There are mote, who will stay to Sunmmer School or
who will not leave until then. If any of these have
as yet failed to put their names in the Union table
tops, they should do so at once.

Summer School Students!
Greetings.
Again we are at your service with
Text ,Books and Students Supplies
For all Departments
LOOSE-LFAF NOTE BOOKS
1 FOUNTAIN PENS
SHOP TOOLS LAB OUTFITS

WAUR 9 S INIVE

S

BOOKSTORE

Bookseller to University of Michigan
Students for over Fifty Years

-

....Managing E-ditor
Business Manager

n are com-
.They are
the United
and if their
several of
ice of wear-
1. Through-
tave wrked
> the Maize
iev are com-

ght glory
in past
.ng to re-
ors. Al-
:presenta-
y do can
hater. If

?s
on

closely to the
hould have a
t unity and a
politan papers,
i the grafting
can we show
for there is
not conducted
ains for THE
rs. Of course
the campus in
uch as keeping
r between. In
hfine itself to
it all to them,
happens. It is

Finding a nickel nowadays, is like kicking a rock
off the sidewalk.
Writing these fillers is too much like a Marathon;
the more you do, the harder itygets.
We suppose that this old clothes movement must
have been a lot of propaganda put out by "Doc"
and "Smuck."
Putting out a paper single.handed is all right when
it's small enough, but when the paper is six pages,
it isn't so much fun.
Perhaps some time the presidential candidates will
learn that the less they sayin the primaries, the more
they can say in the final race.
. ,
Sometimes we wonder why some one can't donate
the money for the Union swimming pool, and help
make the undergraduate's present life cool.
But as the Governor of North Carolina said to
the Governor of South Carolina, it's a long time be-
tween drinks, so why not make the coke a.tall one.
Some people will pay good money to come to
Sumnmer School, and then overlook the best part of
it, the course in special lectures, which doesn't cost
a thing
The Democratic attempts to bring up the prohibi-
tion question make us think that they must have
found the trip across the Great American Desert
pretty dry..
In addition to bringing in the filthylucre, the edi-
torial department has found the business staff very
useful in fillirng up the paper with ads, which is qpite
a'help with the present scarcity of news.
For.once in the world's history a great thing has
happened., Both the editorial and business sides of
THE WoLVERINE are in full hirmony, due probably
to the percentage system of splittintg up the profits.
TheBean Ba
It's a Pun
"This humor will certainly help the crops," said
the farmert.as he looked over his wheat field.
Honfe-Brez, as It Were
Soaiety has its coming out,
Or call itwhat you chose;
But since that fateful July day
Every one makes de-booze.
Just Like the Rest of Them
The Woman 'of the University had just been
awarded her diploma. On the arm of her escort
she walked int'o the Union by the front door-; saun-
tered down into the Tap room; waited her way
through the bread line, and finally sat down to eat.
Suddenly she burst into tears, and in vain her friend
attempted to comfort her.
"What's the matter?" 'he painfully asked.
"Ohh," she sobbed, "I-I finally got into the Tap
room, but I'm not a co-ed any more."
Our Daily Novelette
The old grad sidled up to the,bar. .His foot auto-
matically. went lp to the foot rail and he rested his
weary head upon his arm, which he placed tiredly
upon the bar. With dim and hazy eyes he read the
labels on the bottles, which decorated the ledge at
the rear, and he painstakingly read the list of spe-
cials, which had been painted in streaming white
letters across the bar glass.
"Yuh know," he said sadly to the man behind the
bar, who was busily engaged in mixing the drinks
which had the delightful color of cocktails, "I've
been looking all afternoon for this place. I've
stopped every stranger on the sidewalk and asked

him where I could get such a drink as you serge
here, and I'm glad to say I've found it."
The man in white stopped his shaking, poured
forth a delicious concoction into a tell slender glass,
and decorated its contours with fresh, green mint.
"What's yours ?" he asked briskly, after he had dis-
posed of his mixture to a thirsty, eager patron.
"Well,'if you charge me just what it's worth, if
you don't put the price up like these other robbers
around here because this drink's a little scarce," he
replied, "I'll take a five-cent coke."
"Shoot, if thou must," he cried with bravado. -I,
wear Paris garters; no metal can touch my gray
head."
We Woider Why They Sold So Many Bottles
WARNING!
" If this is mixed with yeast ,the ingredients will
be intoxicating.

Bckcr,s
SDeioatesem
a -
.119 E. Liberty St.
- Phon ,2620M,
00,.. St~s y.,.4 to 6 .M.
- --.P L -~~I Y
aa
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The An [Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $00,000.00
Resources, $4,750,000.00
Northest Corner Main & Huron
707 North Universiy Avenue
Flowrs reat
Lasting Friend-
START RIGHT
BluM ize Blossom
Shop
Nickels Arcade 600M

THE ALLY OF EVERY OTHER SPORT -
KODAK
FOR KODAK AMATEURS THIS STORE IS G. H.
Cameras, Photographic Helps and Conveniences
that make Picture Making all the Easier,-Film
and Paper
EVERYTHING'S HERE
LYNDON AND COMPANY
719 NORTH UNIVERSITY

I

Q.

THE "Y" INN
LANE HALL:

FOR TRAVELING ANYWHERE, ANY TIME
You Will Enjoy U~sig the
A.B.A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50, and $100, and are
cashed by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identifica-
tion.
--ASKUS-
FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK
101-105 South main Street 330 Southi State Street
(Nickels Arcade)

LUNCH AND DINNER (per week) ... .$5.75

a , . .,.
.

YOUR SUMMER COURSE WILL
NOT BE COMPLETE WITH
OUT A VISIT TO OUR
DISPLAY ROOM
Come in and let us show you our varied
stock of Curling Irons, Grills, Toasters,
Percolators, Table Lamps, and other
electrical merchandise.
THlE DETROIT EDISON, COMPANY
Main and William Streets
Phone 2300

LUNCH . ... ......................45
DINNER . . ................... .60
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER... .75

d

vill be a difficult task.
nall, must have a staff,
VERIN issues its call for
.nity is offered any one,
experience in writing,
work, whether they in-
ot. The little that one
will help immensely in
h one does here can not
ad, for from this. paper
n of what is demanded
it perhaps the greatest
vspaper work is contact
Jniversity. Few people
teach in Michigan, and
s these men have. In
hese sources, one meets
vhom an average person
and a few minutes with
make the individual a

I

>pbrtunities as these that TuE WOL-
to prospective workers and there are
ances 'besides these. Without assist-
LvERINE will be unable to fulfill its
ly; without working on THE Wo,-
men and women will be missing a
ity.
P UP THE TRADITION
iigan'straditions is going, if the rec-
year is to be considered. For years
custom, when Joe's was running in.
he seniors to carve their initials into
tables. Here were kept the names
ho left they University each year, and
these ancient tables became filled as
: on, they were taken off and hung
g, where all of the returning gradu-
them. Years later when the men
lumni, they could once more visit the
youth, see the old- table tops, which
d, and see the names of their-class-

EIGHT HONORARY
DEGREES AWARDED
(Continued from Page 1)
scientious and painstaking in the per-
formanc of. his important public
duties;she has never spared himself in
his devotion to the best interests' of
the American soldier.a
Doctor of Engineering.-Mr. Henry
Martyn Leland, tof Detroit, Michigan.
A son of New England, but for thirty
years a resident of this commonwealth.
Bringing with him the sterling virtues
characteristic of early New' England
life, he has been a dynamic influence
in the industrial development of his
adopted state and a distinguished lead-
er in movements for civic betterment.,
Always standing for the highest ideals
he has made a record in the field of
mechanical science as applied to man-
ufacturing development that has
brought to him not, only local and na-
tional, but also foreign recognition..
Doctor of Laws.LDr. Edwin Francis
Gay, of New York City. A graduate of
Michigan, College of Literature,, Sci-
ence, and the Arts in the class of 1890.
Called to Harvard university, after a
period of study abroad, he won early
and notable recognition as teacher and
investigator in the field of economics.
As its dean, he organized and devel-
oped along original lines the Harvard
Graduate 'chool of Business Adminis-
tration. During thewaeas a member'
of the commercial economy board of
the council ,of national defense, as a
member of the War Trade board, and
as chairman of the central division of
planning and statistics, he rendered.
valuab'le services to the government.
Now editor of a great. metropolitan"
journal, the New York Evening Post,
and president of the New York Even-
ing Post company. Distinguished as.

scholar, author and administrator, he
merits the highest honor of his alma
mater.
Gay, a Craduate
Doctor of Laws.-Mr. Worthington
Chauncey Ford, of Boston, Mass. Sta-
tistician, editor, author. Successively
chief of the statistical bureaus of the
state and treasury departments of the
United States government. Under his
effective administration, the division of
manuscripts of the Library of, Con-
gress attained its present excellence.
Since 1909, editor of the publications
of the Massachusetts Historical so-
eiety, the oldest 'and most famous of
American historical assdciations. Au-
thor of numerous standard works out
statistics, civic problems and in the
field of American history and biog-
raphy.
Doctor of Laws.-Honorable Joseph
Hall Steere, of .the Michigan Supreme
court. A graduate of the University
of Michigan, College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts in the class of
1876.. For thirty years judge of the'
Michigan circuit, court, the eleventh
judicial circuit. Since September, 1911,
a justice of the Supreme court of the
state. During his long period of serv-
ice upon the bench, Justice Steere has
brought to his judicial duties both
legal ability of a high order and a.
keen Tsense of, justice that have won
the confidence andrespect of bench
and bar alike. A man of literary ap-1
preciation and scholarly attitude, he
has found the time in the course of
his busy judicial career to make. ex-
haustive studies from original sources
into the early history of the northern
region surrounding the Great Lakes.
He is entitled to special recognition
from his alma mater.
Crowder Distinguished
Doctor of Laws. - Major-Generali
Enoch Herbert Crowder, United States1

Army. For more than 40 years in the
service of his country. Distinguished
for his work in connection with the
estpblishment of local systems of gov-,
ernment in the Philippine islands and
in Cuba. For nearly ten years he
served with great distinction and abil-
ity as judge advocate general of the
army and later duritg the great war
as provost-marshal general' in execu-
tive charge of the administration of
the selective service law under the pro-
visions of which more than two million
eight hundred thousand men were in-
ducted into the army. A brave soldier
and an administrator of rare ability.
In honoring him the University honors
herself.
Doctor of Laws.-Dr. Marion LeRoy
Burton. A graduate of Carleton Col-
lege, Minnesota, and of Yale univer-
sity. President successively of Smith
College and of thetUniversity of Minne-
sota. Scholar, author, orator, a wisely
progressive and forceful university ad-
ministrator, a man of rare attainments
and high ideals, eminently fitted by
temperament, training, and experience
for leadership in the field of higher
education.
LEAGUE TO ADOPT
NEW BUDGET PLAN
At the annual meeting of the joint
boards of the Woren's league.a budget
system was adopted for next year.
Such a system has never before been
tried by this organization. The budget
was planned by the retiring president
and treasurer.
At this meeting a committee was ap-
pointed also for the purpose of taking
charge of a fund to be used as a start
in a campaign for a Women's league
house.

's this tradition almost
esight of the Union offi-

I,

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