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June 26, 1920 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ie And Lundgren Leave
in St. Louis NationaJ Team

'oteges to Chi-
or Interna-
Meet

WEEK

L

with his seven pro-
npeting in the Olym-
fternoon, left for Chi-
lay morning. On ar-
Ady City the men put
and went out to give
over.
ist week Michigan's
:wing just light work-
time have they tried
Steve just let them
o keep in shape, but
go the limit, for fear
>uld go stale in the
as Competition
gave hard competitionI
ip, if he has to com-
have Sol Butler as a
relin Hoffman, Dunne
vill probably fight it
selves, but Miller of
nett of Illinois will
nons will find their
ainst Scholz of Mis-
Notre Dame, and
hicago Ath.letic club.
some tough sledding
there being several
> have put it farther,
mark. Captain-elect
Emery of Illinois a
v !440.
to place first in eachl
e ones who will com-
s at Harvard July 17,
ke' the competition of
n the trip across to
iners will train on a!
e boat, and the weight
ut on an upper deck.

Kenneth T. Knode, Varsity shortstop
for three years and captain in 1919,1
ai , Carl Lundgren, Michigan baseball
coach since 1914, left last night for
Cincinnatti, where they will join the
St. Louis Cardinals.I
Mike, after saying for some time
that he did not intend to take up pro-]
fessional ball, finally consented to try
a season, although he expects to take;
up medicine at the close of this year.
Branch Rickey of the Cardinals has
engaged Coach Lundgren to coach his1
pitchers.
To Try at Short
While with the St. Louis Nationals
Knode will try out for an infield posi-
tion, most probably shortstop. Horns-
by, the Cardinal second baseman, is
one of the best in the big leagues, and
Mike is not attracted by third base,
so that he will undoubtedly devote his
efforts to remaining a shortstop.
In trying out for this position, he
will be going up against another
Michigan man, Johnny Lavan, who
SIXTEUN MEN RECIV 1
THEIBASEBALL INSIGNIA,

was here in 1914. While Lavan has
been going well, he was recently in-
jured, and the rest which. he might'
get from giving way to Knode for a
short time would undoubtedly put him
back into his old-time form.
Lundgren, who was for six years a
pitcher with the Chicago Cubs, will
train the St. Louis pitchers. Through
great friendship with Branch Rickey,
who was .Michigan's coach just before
Lundgren ctme, he secured the posi-
tion for the summer, and he also suc-
ceeded in getting Knode to go with
him.
Will Get Cance
For the first few weeks around the
Cardinal camp, Knode will probably
just work out with the regulars and
learn a few of the tricks of the big
leagues. However, Lundgren expects
that he will get his chance to show
his worth in a short/time after he
has been with, the team.
Some watchers of the game have
thought that Knode did not have an
arm strong enough to stand the pace
of the big, leagues, but Coach Lund-
gren said that he had an arm which
was much better than was apparent.
"Mike has just as good a peg as many
of the National and American league
shortstops, and he ought to stay up
with the best of them," he said.
Was Captain
* While in the Upiversity of Michigan,
Knode played shortstop for three years
and in his second year he was cap-
tain. He has been considered the best
man in the Conference, and Cruisin-
berry of the Tribune classed him as
the best man on any college team.
Fielding better than any one on the
team,,.Knode couples this with a bat-
ting power which let him lead the
Conference for two years, and he is
one of the fastest men in the Big Ten.
Knode has a baseball head, and there
is not a play which he does not play
correctly.

BECOMEELIGI6BLE
Only One of Yost's Hopes Fails to
Pass Last Seikester's Ex-
aminations
STEIETEE, ALL-AMERICAN, ,
WILL REPRESENT MICHIGAN
Michigan's most promising football
candidates, with one exception, came
through the final examinations of last

"LIEERTY TEA SHOP'
620 EAST LIBERTY STREET
"HOME-COOKED MEALS"
13 MEALS....................... . . ...... . $6
20 MEALS .......;................. ... . 7
SUNDAY CHICKEN DINNER ....................
L. SELLE HIGGS, Prop.

EIGHT IIOUSES OPEN IURING
SUMMER SCHOOL SESSION
Six sorority houses and two dormi-
tories will remain open during summer
schol. Each of these will provide. its
own chaperon, in most cases an alum-
na of the sorority.

Omega, Alpha Xi Delta, C
Gamma Phi Beta, Kappa Al
Pi Beta Phi. Of the dormil
en Newberry residence and
residence will be open. M
dormitory will be closed.

TEN

OF TEAM MAY NOT
BACK IN SCHOOL
IN SPRIG

1tE

5l
14
d
I
n
is
F
I.
01
v
E

semester with flying colors. The -Ath-
.etic association, which sent in imme-
liately for the grades of the athletes,
inds that all the men will be eligible.
Steketee, all-American fullback in
1918, and his team-mates of that year,
Jsher, Dunn and Perrin, all back-field
nen on the 1918 undefeated eleven,
are now in a position to represent once
more the Maize and Blue on the grid-
iron.
With the wealth of material wlich
is found on last fall's freshman squad,
prospects look more favorable for the
Wolverines than they did at this period
last year, when it was found that many
of Michigan's best men would have to
watch the games from the side lines.
For a line Yost will have at his call
Vick, center, who passed all his work
satisfactorily, Captain Goetz and Tad
Weiman at tackles, and Dunne, Rye
and Goebel at the flanking positions.
F'or guards he will have Van Orden,
Hugh Wilso , and other men of last
year's Varsity and freshman team.
Several good back-field men ,were
discovered on the freshman eleven.
Paper, a quarter, and Searle, another
quarter, were among ,the most prom-
ising. Steketee's return to eligibility
insures Michigan of a punter and place
kicker, who will be able to equal the
wonderful work of Sparks of last year.
Approximately 75 names of men are
on the list of those who are coming!
back two weeks before the opening of.
school for fall training, and a larger
number are billed to return a week
early. A canyass has been made of
the entire University for men who
have had football experience at all,
and every man will be urged to come
out.

SWAIN.
713 E. University Avenue
develops films
and
MAKES PRINTS
with care

Cream Milk But
A Modern and San!
Plant
COR, N. 4th AND CA
TELEPHONE 423

I -L-IIil O r

Sixteen men were awarded\ their
"M's" for baseball work, and three
more received "aMa's." Of this num-
ber six are seniors who were gradu-
ated Thursday, and four more will be
in a position to graduate at the end
of the first semester next year.
The men who received "M's were:
Parks, Saunders, Smith, Scheidler,.
Gariepy, Genebach, Froemke, Newell,
Van Boven, Knode, Mraz, Klrchgess-
ner, Langenham, Perrin, and Weadock.
The following men received "aMa's":
Broome, Leon Parks, Middleditch.

1

Ann Arbor Dairy

PURE PASTERUIZED

FREEMAN'S
DINING ROOM
LUNCH AND DINNER (per week) .....$...
BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER (per week) .$8.(
803 EAST WASHINGTON STREET
(One block north of Hill Auditorium)

Calkins
Drug
Co.

FOUNTAIN PENS
It is easy to find one of our stores an
of them has a stock of pens from which :
surely find one to suit you.
324 SOUTH STATE STREE
E. & S. UNIVERSITY AVEN
1 1 PACKARD STREET

ere is a chance that Steve Farrell
be taken along with the American
as a trainer or a coach, as he
nsidered pne of the best track
3es in the country. Steve said
he would go across at his own
ise if four of his men placed on
)lympic squad. -
addition -to entering the javelin
rday, Dunne will try out for the
thlon at Brooklyn July 4. Baker,
shot-putter, will do the same.
these men are almost equally
and Steve said they both had a
chance. While not of champion-
caliber in any of the five events,
r one of these men is consistently
e events which they will compete
the pentathlon are the 200-metre,
1,500-metre run,' the discus, the
I jump, and the javelin.
kTERMAN GYM TO
3E OPEN FOR USE
.nouncement was made Friday by
May that Waterman gymnasium
d open Monday for individual and
instruction during the Summer
ion. Tickets for lockers, the fee
which is 50 cents, can, be pur-
ed at the treasurer's office.
eryone using the gym for exercise
r bathing will be required to have
ker. Dr. May's office will be open
y day except Saturday from 10 to
nd from 2 to 5 o'clock.
PLANS BIG HOSPITAL
SERVICE FOR THIS S'IUMER
wherry hall will be open during
summer, school session. Ermina
agham, '16, will be the secretary,
the Y. W. C. A. will continue its
.l work.
nong the plans for the summer
mapy concerning the social serv-
work done at the hospitals. In
tion to the story-telling and game-
ing, a system is planned whereby
Jniversity women with cars may
nteer to spend an hour or as much
as they can give in taking the
Iren for rides.
e Y. W. C. A. is co-operating with
Y. M. C. A. in arranging a pro-
n for religious education for the

Graduation Hits Team
The baseball team is apparently hard
hit by graduation. If the men finish
when they all should, Newell, Van
Boven and Knode of the infield will not
be back next year; Perrin, Langenham
and Kirchgessner will not return for
the outfield; Froemke, catcher, will
have left, and Saunders, Gariepy nad
Scheidler, pitchers, have already grad-
uated.,
However, 'for Coach Lundgren to
mould next year's nine, he has the
most wonderful college pitcher of to-
day in Captain Parks, and Genebach is
Ieft behind the bat. Mraz and Karpus,
both third basemen, will fit in there,
or even at second or short. From the
freshman nine will come a good in-
fielder in Uteritz, and tle freshman
catching staff is the 'est part of their
team, there being such men as Coailes,
Skinner, Robie, and Vick,. a junior who
was ineligible.
Not uch Left
Outfielders can be found fromn this
year's material or from the freshman
team. Although there will not be so
much left of the nine, wbich won the
third successive baseball champion-
ship for Michigan, the outlook is bright
for making it a fourth year next
spring.
Perrin, Newell, and Van Boven may
not finish in February, and might re-
turn for the 1921 baseball season.
MILWAUKEE ALUMNI
GIVE SC HOLARSHIP I

PRINCETON HONORS
GEDDES, CARRELL

Princeton, N. J., June 26.-Sir Auck-
land Campbell Geddes, British anbas-
sador to this country, Dr. Alexis Carrel
and 16" other distinguished men were
awarded honorary degrees at the one
hundred and seienty-third commence-
ment exercises of Princeton univer-
sity! Three hundred and one under-
graduates received diplomas. The en-
dowment fund has passed $8,000,000,
according to announcement.
The degree of Doctor of Laws was
conferred on Geddes. Other recipients
of that degree were Calvin Noyes Ien-
dali, of Princeton, educator; Raphael
Pumpelli, Newport, R. I., explorer and
scientist; John Work Garrett, Balti-
more; Thomas G. Haight, Jersey City,
diplomatist. Dr. Carrel, of the Rocke-
feller Institute, received the degree of
Doctor of Science with William Bar-
clay Parsons, New York, engineer.
The degree of Doctor of Divinity
was conferred on Rev. Dr. John S.
Lyons, Atlanta, the degree of Doctor
of Letters was awarded Professor Paul
Shorey, Chicago, and Headmaster
Mather A. Abbott, of Lawrenceville,
and that of Doctor of Arts on Albert
W. Atwood, Princeton, and Edwand L.
Bradley, Lakeville, Illinois.
Columbus, 0., June 26.-Degrees
were conferred upon 891 graduates at
the commencement exercises of Ohio
State university, at which former Gov-
ernor Samuel W. McCall, of Massachu-
setts, delivered the commencement ad-
dress.
Northwood, Mass., June 26.-A class
of 325 was graduated from Smith Col-
lege at the forty-second commence-
ment exercises here.. Frederick James
Eugene Woodbridge, dean of Columbia
Columbia university, gave the address.
New Brunswick, N. J., June 26.-
Herbert Hoover and Dr. Jacob Gould
Schurman, retiring president of Cor-
nell university, received honorary de-
grees of Doctor of Laws at the one
hundred and fifty-fourth annual con-
mencement of Rutgers college here.
Oxford, 0., June 26.-John H. Patter-
son, Dayton, 0., manufacturer, was
honored by Miami university, at the
annualcommencement exercises here.
He received the honorary degree of
Doctor of Laws.
CHUBB HOUSE
209 South State
OPEN FOR
SUMMER
SCHOOL
"TASTES LIKE HOME"
G. S. CHUBB, PROP.

PH ONE 165

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hite Swan L

Co. Ltd.

"Father and Son" night was observed
at the annual meeting and smoker of
the Milwaukee University of Michigan
alumni, in the Milwaukee Athletic club.
A number of Milwaukee high school
students who expect to enter the Mich-
igan university next fall, were guests.
Movies of the campus and collegiate;
activities were shown.
Announcement was made of a silver
cup, donated by Morton R. Ibunter, to
be knownas the Michigan Alumni as-
sociation cup, will be offered as a
trophy in the annual intercity field
meets. The winning school each year
will be awarded the cup until the next
annual meet. The cup will become the
permanent property of the school win-
ning it three times.
The association authorized an an-
nual one-year freshman scholarship at
Michigan, amounting to $250. . This
scholarship is open to any young man
graduating from the Milwaukee high
schools. The award will be based upon
scholastic ability, character, and qual-
ities in leadership.
William J. Morgan was elected pres-
ident of the association for the ensuing
year. Other. officers chosen were:
Vice-president, J. E. Ferris; secretary,
Wyeth Allen; treasurer, E. B. Arnold;
recording secretary, G. E. Farmer.

Detroit and Catherine Sis.

i

We. 'wash in oft water only

Sew on buttons and. do reasona

Michiganenslan Manager Weds
Duncan Cameron, '19, and Frances
inzel, '20, were married June 21
t. Andrew's Episcopal church in
Arbor. Cageron is a member of
. Tau Delta, Griffins, Druids, and
business manager of the 1919
iganensian. Mrs. Cameron is a
ber of Alpha Chi Omega. They
reside in Detroit, Mr. Cameron'

mending tree,,ot charge

ONE DAY SERVICE ON REQUEST

p

*

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