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June 25, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-06-25

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Y, JUNE 25, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

r, JUNE 25, 1952 PAGE THREI~

Indecisive

Korean
* * *

War

Starts

Third

Year

UN Forces
Begin ..New

C*

* *

* $ '

* : *

* * *

Air Attacks
Talks End First
Year Deadlocked
By VIRGINIA VOSS
The Korean War-a luke-warm
battle of frustration and confu-
sion-enters its third year today.
For the past six months marked
by indecisive, stalemated fighting,
the war Monday went into what
might be a major new phase with
the United Nations mass bomb-
ing attacks on Manchurian pow-
er sources.
Speculation over the possibili-
ties of a new Allied policy to-
ward Communist forces once
again heightened public interest
in the costly, politically signifi-
cant peninsular battle which has,
assumed world wide importance.
* * *
TWO YEARS of war in Korea,
and the one-year old truce talks
have had a profound effect on na-
tional and world military devel-
opments and on the realignment
of world power.
With the North Korean drive
over the 38th Parallel on June
25,. 1950, United Stat s mili-
tary leaders were forced into a
revised theory of military war-
fare.
It became apparent that the
foot soldier, the ground army, was
nowhere near being obsolete; air
and naval forces alone could not

Over 5,000
GetDegrees
During Year
The University granted 5,298
degrees during the 1951-52 school
year, according to University Sec-
retary Herbert G. Watkins.
Final figures for the June 14
commencement show'that 2,933
degrees were granted at that time.
Previously 2,365 graduates had
completed the necessary require-
ments during the 1951 summer
session and at the end of the fall
semester in February.
Six Distinguished Alumni Ser-
vice Medals were conferred during
the annual Alumni Luncheon on
Commencement Day.
The awards were given to: Mrs.
Nellie Rice Roberts af Grand
Rapids, a member of the Board
of Directors of the Alumni Asso-
ciation; George A. Osborn, editor
of the Sault Ste. Marie Evening
News; Harold V. Maurer; an ar-
chitect from South Bend, Ind.;
A. H. Syversona retired adver-
tising executive of Spokane, Wash.;
George Mason, of Detroit, presi-
dent of the Nash-Kelvinator Cor-
poration and Wilfred B. Shaw of
Ann Arbor, General Secretary of
the Alumni Association and Dir-
ector Emeritus of Alumni Rela-
tions.

GEN. DOUGLAS MACARTHUR GEN. MATTHEW B. RIDGWAY
. . three supreme UN commanders in two-year

GEN. MARK CLARK
Korean war

* * *
bring victory. Recent air devel-
opments, the jet fighters, were an
indispensible technical develop-
ment. Consequently, anxiety for
U.S. air superiority has this year
become a campaign issue.
Within the United States, de-
fense build-up and increased
draft quotas are a direct result of
the tedious war.
* * 'I
Grim Cost of War
BUT REARMAMENT and two
years of steady fighting have
piled up a grim cost-in dollars
and lives.
In a war involving 1,815,000
combatants, the casualty list for
both sides has reached a total of
1,300,000. United States casual-
ties number 110,000.{

71

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on

Summer Session
TEXTBOOKS. and
SUPPLIES
AT
FOLLETT'S
STATE STREET AT NORTH UNIVERSITY

* * * *
Excluding defense rearma-
ment, military activities have
cost the nation approximately
$10 to $15 billion since June
1950. South Korean damages
stand at about $2 billion.
United Nations aircraft losses
total 1,010 against 580 Commu-
nist planes. Authorities attribute
our heavier loss to the fact that
we are on the air offensive.
* * *
VIEWED IN PERSPECTIVE,
United Nations military gains
have been substantial. In August
6, 1950, the picture was discour-
aging as United Nations forces
battled to hold their beachhead
on the southeast corner of the
Korean peninsula.
But the turning point of the
war came with the United Na-
tions amphibious landing 170
miles behind Communist lines.
There began a strong effort of
combined forces which pushed
Communists behind the 38th
parallel.
Except for a second massive
North Korean thrust in Novem-
ber of 1950 which temporarily
pushed the Allies below the sig-
nificant line, the 38th parallel has
remained a static battle front for
most of the war.
United Nations negotiators at
Panmunjom won a major vic-
tory when truce teams agreed
on an armistice line along the
battlefront-for the most part
iorth of the 38th division line.
But if the gains have been subs
stantial, they have nevertheless
been indecisive. Both armies are
fighting a defensive war, and the
United Nations policy has been a
tenacious , hanging-on to past
gains, keeping in constant prep-
aration for a new North Korean
drive.
* *
Western Build-up
POLITICALLY, the Korean war
and resulting negotiations have
necessitated fortification of the
West's stand against Communist
agression.
Initially, the United States and
the United Nations won a psycho-
logical victory by uniting 16 coun-
tries and taking up arms against
the Communist cause. United Na-
tions gains renewed faith in the
West's military strength, and
prompted build-up of Western
forces.
In Europe, the loose, inef-
fective North Atlantic Treaty
Organization was spurred to
armament conferences which
generally left NATO a sturdy
coalition of Western powers.

* * *
ist aggression. They cannot, on
the other hand, risk an all-out
military effort for fear of a world
war.
* * *
Stalemated Tal=s
IN PANMUNJOM, the year-old
truce talks are bogged down in
the same unavoidable way. Though
settlement of three of the issues
of harried truce teams' four-point
agenda has been reached, negotia-
tors in the circus tent in Panmun-
join have been deadlocked for
three months over the remaining
issue - exchange of prisoners of
war.
Optimism and pessimism have
alternated in public reaction to
the talks, with the latter pre-
dominating. In July 1951 when
the UN truce team left for the
devastated island carrying small
suitcases, optimism ran high.
But it soon sank, as negotiators.
arrived on the "peace-camp" site
to find it swarming with armed
Reds. Halted talks resulted.
Scheduling of an agenda, the
policy of retaining UN troops in
Korea until a settlement was
reached, and the bufferzone is-
sue alternately snarled negotia-
tions.
IN NOVEMBER, 1951, hopes
soared up again for a peace by
Christmas as the buffer-zone was
settled along the battle-line.
For the past three months the
Panmunjom scene has been dis-
mal, as Koje Island prison riots
have given the Reds food for
their propaganda against the
UN principle of voluntary re-
patriation of prisoners of war.
The successful, recently com-
pleted division of Koje into small-
er, more orderly compounds is
aimed at tearing down Commun-
ist propaganda, which has been
influential in stalemating the
talks.
Whatever development the ne-
gotiations will bring in the future
-even if it is continued stale-
mate-there is no indication of a
change in United Nations policy
to "hold on" to Western principles
on the battlefront and across truce
tables. As most observers see it,
the policy is a weary but a firm
one.

UN INFANTRYMEN TEAR DOWN RED BANNER IN KOJE ISLAND DISPUTE
* *I * *~_________

By MIKE WOLFF,
The jitters and uncertainty,
over the Korean War and nebu-
lous draft regulations that hit the
campus during the winter of 1950-
51 have subsided to a large extent,
University officials felt.
The widespread feeling at that
time of "having a good time and
sliding through on all C's" ap-
pears to have largely given way
to a more mature adjustment to
the draft situation.
* * *
MOST of the administrators
interviewed ascribed this change
to the clarification of the draft
laws last spring with the result
that most students now have a
clearer understanding of their
draft status and have been tak-
ing things more in their stride.
Assistant Dean James H.
Robertson of the Literary Col-
lege explained that previously
many of thedstudents were un-
certain and confused over
whether to anticipate a draft
call and enlist in the branch
of the service they preferred or
to just wait and trust to luck.
Dean of Students Erich A. Wal-
ter felt that most of the students
who have been deferred have rec-
ognizedatheir educational oppor-
tunity and have used it to the
best of their ability.
University officials were also
inclined to believe that the effect
of the Korean War on enrollment
has not been as great as it was
feared in the fallgof1950 when
the University experienced its
first big enrollment drop since
the end of World War II.
* * *
THE LOW birthrate during the
depression years of the early
1930's as well as, the expected

U' Students Adjusting Better
To Korean War, Draft Laws

drop in veteran attendance dur-
ing the past two years has tend-
ed to overshadow the effect of
the Korean War on the Universi-
ty's enrollment decline,, it was
felt.
However, Sgt. Holt of the
United States Army and Air
Force recruiting center here in
Ann Arbor reported that so far
this year about 150 University
students have enlisted in the
Air Corps while approximately
75 chose to do their tour of duty
with the Army.
He said this was a larger en-
listment rate than that of 1951
and explained that enlistments
tend to fluctuate directly with
the draft quotas.
ROTC at the University has
also been affected by the draft
and the war in Korea. Although
the Army and Navy officer's
training programs have remained
fairly constant over the last four
years, the Air ROTC has grown
from 75 men in 1948 to 650 last
year, according to Capt. Eugene
C. Maxam.
Moore To Speak
Prof. A. D. Moore, of the engi-
neering college, will address ttie
General Meeting of the American
Engineers today at Minneapolis.
He will speak on "A New Prop-
erty of Two-Dimensional Fields"
during the afternoon session, and
will also give a lecture and dem-
onstration on "FluidrMatter" in
the evening.
See Daily Classifieds

I

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SALE - Closing out our
ORIENTAL RUG SHOP
- IN TWO WEEKS
Forty-five pieces of choice
ORIENTAL RUGS - Kerman, Hamadan,
Keshom, Shiraz, Kabistan, Backtiary, etc.
All scatter pieces: 5x8, 5x7, 4x6, 3x5, 2x4, 2x3, 0
also runners: 2x8, 2.6x7, 2.5x12, 3x14.6.
One fine Herez 8.6x11.6
Each Piece Is Marked Very Low
Each piece is a great bargain.
An oriental rug is a good investment,
a wise hedge against inflation.
OPEN 10 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
Q N. L. Mangouni ... 334 So. 4th Ave.
Phone 6878
b YCOd) O "C).CO G> t

SUMMER HOBBIES
MODEL AIRPLANES
MODEL TRAINS
OLD TYMER CARS
RACE CARS
115 WEST
LIBERTY ST.
Summer Hours: Saturday
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5 P.M 8:30-12:30
CLOSED ALL DAY JULY 5TH

I.

PA

WATCH FOR THE
GRAND OPENING
of our new camera shop
at
1116 SO. UNIVERSITY
We will carry
a complete line of
" CHEMICALS
" PAPER
" EQUIPMENT,
Purchase Camera Shop

U

NNW,

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OF USED AND NEW

And in Asia, Communist China,
aided by Russia, has taken on a
strong military and political sig-
nificance.
What the Korean war picture
adds up to is little more than in-
decision and stalemate. United
Nations forces cannot pull out of
Korea and still hold up United
Nations tenets against Commun-

TI'

I

BOOK

I

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Bargains in
BRIEF CASES
FACTORY SECONDS
* Split Cowhide 11.95
* Top Grain 18.45
Fed. Tax Included

Headquarters
for
FOUNTAIN PENS
. ESTERBROOKS
" PARKERS
# SCHAEFFERS
EXTRA ESTERBROOK
POINTS IN STOCK

I

-

Lt)=>C)=<== -z>oUQ<= 0 0=>o=>04==> cs<;z=>O.C=OQOme >O
ifyou CAN'Tgo to Europe
or South America 0
_ if you HAVE to study this summer ...
THE NEXT BEST THING is to take home some aifts n

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NEXT MONDAY -
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