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June 25, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-06-25

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A

Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1952

* U

JUNE MEETING:
Regents Accept Grants;
Approve Appointments

Sailors Keep Cool

At their June meeting the Re-
gents accepted grants and gifts
totalling $68,639.44, approved com-
mittee, board and faculty appoint-
ments and granted leaves of ab-
sence.
Three grants amounting to $10,-
700 were made by the Wenner-
Gren Foundation for Anthropo-
logical Research, Inc., of New
York, $6,000 for the Central Mis-
sissippi Valley Archaeological Sur-
vey fund, $3,700 for research work
under the direction of Prof. Les-
lie A. White, chairman of the an-
thropology department.
* * *
THE ROCKEFELLER Foundation
of New York made a grant of $8,-
500 to be used for the Rockefeller
Public Health Economics fund,
under the direction of Prof. Na-
than Sinai of the School of Pub-
lic Health, for the period from
July 1, 1952 to June 30, 1953.
The Galens Workshop was
the recipient of $6,200 from the
Galens Honorary Medical So-
iety.
The Regents also accepted the
offer of Mr. and Mrs. Robertson
Page, of Boston, Mass., to provide
a fellowship of $5,000 for studies
in the prevention or cure of polio-
myelits. The fellowship is a me-
morial to their son and will be
known as the Robbie Page Fel-
lowship.
It is to be supervised by Prof.
Thomas Francis, Jr., of the School
of Public Health.
Included in the total of gifts
and grants is $22,397.47, repre-
senting additions to 47 already es-
tablished funds.
AMONG the appointments ap-
proved by the Regents and an-
nounced by President Harlan H.
Hatcher were five members of the
Faculty Senate to the executive
committee of the Center for Jap-
anese Students for five year terms
beginning July 1. Appointed were
Robert B. Hall, James M. Plumer,
Charles F. Remer, Mischa Titiev
and Joseph K. Yamagiwa.
Prof. Paul W. McCracken was
named for a two-year term,
ending June 30, 1954, to the
executive committee . of the
School of Business Administra-
tion, replacing Prof. Dudley M.
Phelps.
Edgewater Park
Ballroom presents
" Don Cornell
America's newest
singing sensation
Fri. and Sat.
June 27th and 28th
0 DANCING
to Fred Netting
and his orchestra
Located -- 7 Mile
Road between
Lasher and Telegraph
Detroit

On the executive committee of
the College of Architecture and
Design, Prof. Walter W. J. Gores
was appointed for a four-year
term to replace Prof. C. Theodore
Larson.
Prof. A. E. R. Boak was named
to succeed himself on the execu-
tive committee of the Museum of
Archaelogoy.
THREE APPOINTMENTS to
the executive committee of the
Bureau of School Services were
made to Clyde Vroman, director
of admissions, and new deans,
Dean Charles E. Odegaard of the
literary college and Dean Willard
C. Olson of the education school.
Prof. William G. Dow was ap-
pointed for a four-year term, on
the executive committee of the
College of Engineering in place
of Prof. John C. Brier.
Miss Hazel M. Avery was named
for a two-year term on the execu-
tive committee of the School of
Nursing replacing Miss Ann J.
Buckeridge.
Prof. Leigh C. Anderson and
Prof. Robert R. White were ap-
pointed to five year terms on the
executive board of the Horace H.
Rackham School of Graduate
Studies.
Prof. Thomas Frances, Jr.,
wil replace Prof. Gordon C.
Brown on the executive commit-
tee of the School of Public
Health.
Prof. Donald G. Marquis and
Prof. Arthur W. Bromage were
named to succeed themselves on
the executive committee of the In-
stitute for Social Research.
*~ * *
THE APPOINTMENT of Prof.
George E. Mendenhall as visiting
professor in the near eastern
studies department for the next
academic year was approved by
the Regents.
Also appointed were Prof. Dar-
van A. Moosman as professor of
anatomy in the Medical School
for next year; Dr. Makepeace
Tsao as professor of biochemistry
in the pediatrics department of
the medical school and Gustav
Robinson Gregory as the George
Willis Pack assistant professor of
resource economics in the School
of Natural Resources.
Leaves of absence were grant-
ed to Prof. Donald A. Darling,
Prof. William C. Parkinson, Rich-
ard Wilt, Homer W. Smith, Helen
B. Hall, Mrs. Julia B Kessler,
Robert J. Wolfson, and D. Jeanne
Watson.

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom.
SAILING, SAILING--Members of the popular University sail.
ing club have a sure way to beat the heat. They dash out
to Whitmore Lake at a moments notice to man the fine fleet
of sail-boats owned by the club. An organizational meeting will
be held at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Union to which all inter-
ested students are invited. No experience is needed, for the ex-
erienced sailors will be glad to teach any new members. Swim.
ming, partying and trips to regattas all add to the fun.
Bell Time-Telling Machine
Saves Wear on Vocal Chords

Telling people what time it is
for several hours a day can get
pretty monotonous.
That's one of the reasons why
Bell Telephone Company in De-
troit has installed an ingenious
mechanical time-telling device
that provides accurate time every
second of the day, and never
sounds bored with the job.
* * *
BEFORE November of last year
when the machine was acquired,
operators counted off the seconds
for tedious half-hour stretches,
staring at a clock dial in a sound
proof booth and giving out the
time at 15 second intervals.
Since the installation of an
Audichron time device, opera-
tors can save their nerves for
other uses and the machine au-
tomatically tells the time every
ten seconds.
Operated with a mass of knobs
dials and levers, the machine has
a photo electric cell and emplifier
which send out the time-telling
voice to many cities in the lower
peninsula, including Ann Arbor.
Accurate timing comes from the
National Bureau of Standards in
Washington, D.C. where time sig-
nals are broadcast every five min-
utes.
IT TOOK ONLY 10 minutes to
tell 12 hours of time on the special
Audichron recording films. First
the person making the film said,
"At the tone it will be one," and
so on through the 12 hours. The
minutes and seconds were simi-
larly recorded on other films.

\
Stewrt G G '- eanor
Janet -EIGH ."MeE
Neiy ina Lewis Richard
MICON-"FOCH -STONEANERSOI
Continuous from 1 P.M.
- Coming --
JAMES STEWART
in "CARBINE WILLIAMS"

Then the three separate films
were put on three drums, each
with a variety of gears revolving
at different speeds.j
A super-human "selector car-
riage" mounted on top of the
drums travels back and forth, au-
tomatically selecting the hour,
minute and second in proper se-
quence.
Two lights on the selector, re-
sembling radio tuners, send out a
beam which passes through an
aperature to the mirror-like sur-
face of the drums. The light is
then reflected into a photoelectric
cell which beams the voice to an
amplifier.
THE AUDICHRON, admittedly
not infallible, has duplicate right
and left hand sets, just in case
something goes wrong with one
set. It also has its own power plant
to supplement the variations in
commercial power.
And if any drastic variation in
the time, like a tenth of a second
in two weeks, should occur, a gad-
get on the control board can be
turned to advance or retard the
voice to the right time.
But should the machine suffer
a complete breakdown, manual
equipment and operators are still
on hand to take over the monoton-
ous job of telling people what time
it is.
Giles To Give
Carillon Concert
Sidney Giles, assistant Univer-
sity carilloneur, will present the
first in a series of summer recitals
at 7:15 p.m. tomorrow on the Baird
Memorial Carillon in Burton Tow-
er.
He will open the program with
the playing of his own Prelude 1
for Carillon. Also featured in the
recital will be works by Lefevere,
Nees, Clemet, Handel, Gossec, Boc-
cherini, MacDowell and Mozart.

Law Confab
Topic To Be
AtomicAge
More than 200 people are ex-
pected to attend the fifth annual
law school summer institute which
begins tomorrow and runs through
Saturday.
Topic of the meeting is "Atomic
Energy - Industrial and Legal
Problems," and subject matter will
concern the many problems of an
economic and legal nature develop-
ing for business and industrial
concerns in the atomic age.
The institute is sponsored by the
law school in cooperation with the
Memorial Phoenix Project.
S * *
A FEE of $15 is being charged
to cover attendance at the ses-
sions, a banquet and a luncheon.
Registration begins at 9 a.m. to-
morrow in front of Rm. 100 in the
Law School. All meetings with the
exception of the banquet and
luncheon are slated to be held in
Rm. 100.
Tomorrow from 10 to 12 a.m.
a meeting on "Potential Use of
Atomic Energy by Private En-
terprise," will be held. Speakers
will be Lawrence R. Hafstad,
director of the Division of Reac-
tor Development of the Atomic
Energy Commission, and Paul
C. Aebersold, director of the
Isotopes Division of the Atomic
Energy Commission.
Later in the day from 2 to 4:30
p.m. a session on "Private Capital
for Nuclear Power" is slated. Walk-
er L. Cisler, president of the Detroit
Edison Co., and Edwin J. Putzell,
Jr., secretary of the Monsanto
Chemical Co., will discuss the rela-
tionship of their industries with
nuclear power.
At 7 p.m. tomorrow a banquet
will be held at the Union featuring
a speech by President Harlan H.
Hatcher on "The University Looks
to the Future" and a discussion on
"The Canadian Atomic Energy
Brogram" by J. Lorne Gray, gen-
eral manager of the Atomic En-
ergy of Canada, Ltd. William H.
Davis, chairman of the Atomic
Energy Labor Relations Panel, will
speak on "Labor-Management Re-
lations" at that time.
s «
FROM 9 TO 12 A.M. Friday a
discussion on "The A.E.C. Con-
tractor and Supplier" is scheduled.
Participants will be Carroll L. Wil-
son, mining company president,
and Clark Center, a participant in
A.E.C. installations. Center is a
graduate of the University engi-
neering school. Wilbur E. Kelly of
the A. E. C. will also speak.
Then from 1:30 to 4 p.m. a
meeting will be held on "Gov-
ernment Controls Over Atomic
Energy Utilization." William L.
Davidson will talk on the Office
of Industrial Development and
Casper W. Ooms of the A. E. C.
will discuss patent policies.
From 9:30 to 12. a.m. on Satur-
day there will be a discussion of
"Radiation Hazards to Life and
Property" by Dr. John C. Bugher
of A.E.C. and Orris S. Hiestand,
Jr. of the A. E. C.
At 12:30 p.m. a luncheon is
scheduled at the Union at which
E. Blythe Stason, dean of the law
school, will be toastmaster. Ralph
A. Sawyer, dean of the Graduate
School, will speak on the Phoenix
Project at the luncheon and Rep.
Henry . Jackson (Wash.) will
discuss the Joint Committee on

Atomic Energy of which he is a
member.
Winding up the three days of
activity will be a panel session
from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday after-
noon. The panel will be a round-
up of problems and solutions cov-
ered during the conference.

Borrowed
LANSING--)(A) --There was
nothing illegal about the "gift"
of two raccoons to U.S. Senator
Estes Kefauver (D-Tenn.), in
Detroit last week, the State
Conservation Department re-
ported yesterday.
The coons, symbols of the
Senator's coonskin cap trade-
mark in his campaign for the
Democratic Presidential nom-
ination, were borrowed from
the Belle Isle zoo for the oc-
casion and returned, Durward
Robson, chief of the depart-
ment field administration di-
vision, found.

I

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND

Wide Variety
Of Programs
OfferedHere
(Continued from Page 1)
works creative studio activity and
special lectures and field trips.
* * *
THE SCHOOL of Music is spon-
soring three one-day conferences
for music teachers. The first, a
string teaching conference, will be
held on Thursday, July 10. Then
on July 11 there will be a confer-
ence on school and community
orchestra work. The final confer-
ence, on school vocal music, is
slated for July 12.
Six conferences for English
teachers are being scheduled
throughout the summer. They
will be held each Monday
through July 28 and will deal
with such fields as English com-
position, grammar and creative
writing. Experts from schools
and colleges in this area will
participate in leading the con-
ferences along with University
faculty.
From August 4 to 15 the school
of education in cooperation with
the Commission on Educational
Organizations of the National
Conference of Christians and Jews
is presenting a workshop in Hu-
man relations in school and com-
munity. The workshop is offered
primarily for schoo' administra-
tors. Many prominent educators
from all over the country will take
part in the program.
* * *
SEVERAL other departmental
courses are being offered for grad-
uate students and other interest-*
ed people. The physics department
is presenting a symposium on
modern physis in conjunction
with its regular summer courses.
Four guest lecturers will conduct
courses throughout the summer.
In addition the participating stu-
dents will have an opportunity to
carry on research projects and use
laboratory and library facilities.
The engineering college has
arranged a symposium on heat
transfer. Several guest lectur-
ers will teach along with resi-
dent professors. A wide variety
of related course work is avail-
able.
From July 7 to 18 a symposium
in biological regulation is being
presented. It will consist of a ser-
ies of lectures by visiting expertsI
and faculty members.
Additional information on allI
summer programs, conferences
and courses can be obtained fromI
the summer session office in Rm.
3510 Administration Bldg.
for that
hard-to-find
Textbook
try
FolleItts
State St. at N. Univ.

LOST-Small gold wrist watch, black
cord band. In vicinity of Rackham
and Health Service Bidgs. Phone 6722.
LOST-Around $70 about Friday June
20th either in Waterman's Gymna-
sium, Overbeck's Bookstore or vicin-
ity. Substantial reward. Phone 2-6173.
John Rooney.
FOR SALE
EAST SPINDRIER-1949 Black Renault.
Mrs. Braun, 2-7232.
USED CAR by first owner, 1941 4-dr.
Chevrolet, good running condition.
Call 3-1437 evenings.
ANYBODY, yes anybody, who is enrolled
as a student this summer may obtain
the special ludicrously low rates to
magazines by phoning 6007 or writing
Box 2006, Student Periodical Agency.
Time $3 (reg. $6.) or about 6c a copyi
Life $4 (reg. $6.75) and many more.
We extend Credit. Give us a ring
todayl
GOOD SUMMER CAR -- Clean, well
equipped 1947 Pontiac. Will trade or
sell reasonably. Call Huff 2-5644.
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE JULY 1--A new 3-room
deluxe apartment. Completely fur-
nished, electric stove and refrigerator.
Private entrance. $95 per month. No
children. Need a car. Call 2-9020.
ROOMS FOR RENT
ENGLISH M.D. FAMILY offer room in
exchange for baby sitting. Phone Mr.
Mauleson 2-7132.

e

CLASSIFIEDS

I

ROOMS FOR RENT
LARGE AIRY ROOM in quiet house for
male faculty member or Grad. stu-
dent. Phone 7605..
FURNISHED single apt. Private bath.
Across from Hill Aud. Can 2-6805.
SINGLE ROOM Close to campus and
Union. Shower, continuous hot water.
Student or working man. 509 S. Div.
near Jefferson.
4 STUDENTS-large, spacious 2 bedroom
furnished ap't., twin beds, (practice
room available for music students.)
$125 a month. Also single room. 320 i.
Washington after 4 P.M.
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM AND BOARD or Board only --
Woman's House. Meals five days per
week. 119 Park Ter. off of Felch Park.
Phone 2-1017.
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-To form car pool to Lansing
Friday evenings. Call 8565 7-9 p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING, finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020.
TYPING -Reasonable rates. Accurate,
Efficient. Phone 7590, 830 S. Main..
ALTERATION, Sewing. Mrs. Braun,
2-7232.
WANTED TO BUY
SECOND-HAND Girls Bicycle. Jane May-.
nard, 4526 Stockwell. Ph. 3-161
WANTED--Used Girl's Bike for adult.
Call 5571.

I

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Read and Use
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

+v

6I

* Cinema SL ('dd
present's4
A Summer Season of
OUTSTANDING FILMS
First Program Entirely in
TECH NICOLOR
The Doyly Carte Opera Co.
in Gilbert and Sullivan's
THE MIKADO
also
WALT DISNEY'S
"The Amazon Awakens"
EXTRA! COLOR CARTOON
ARCH ITECTU RE
AUDITORIUM
Friday and Saturday 50c
7:15 and 9:30

14 1

t

Call Kenwood 12660
for information
and reservations
COMING,
NEXT WEEKEND

Plan Roundtable
The first International Round-
table of the summer fill feature
the topic "Foreign Students on
the American Campus" with Dean
Deborah Bacon as guest and Rob-
ert Wolff, Grad., of the Nether-
lands as moderator at 9:30 p.m.
Friday over station WUOM.

TWelcome to
THE PARROT

THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
presents its
1952 Summer Season of Plays

WELCOME TO MICHIGAN

I

I

Your Headquarters
for POPULAR RECORDS is the
DOWNSTA AIRS Popular Record
Department of

"

July 2-5
"Twelfth Night"
by William
Shakespeare
July 9-12
"Harvey"
by
Mary Chase

At"he AtLQrb

July 23-26
"Winterset"
by
Maxwell Anderson
N.Y. Drama Critics Award

August 7,8,9, & 1
"The Merry Wives
of Windsor"
by Otto Nicola i
In conjunction with

July 30-Aug. 2
"Second
Threshold"
by Philip Barry

II

AllI

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