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August 15, 1931 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-08-15

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- smomm - DARK

SATURDAY, AUGUST 15, 1931

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s~ um
IN - M-1 -t M
'feAwdated ?eeis s eA dTWaY atied
t! am ie ib11ilatiea of all aews dip
OWN"edN it or not Otherwlise inedited
yyeee a" the local newspulse
siaanalso reserved.
~tiee at the AnnArosMeia ph
few " seesod Blase .atter.
eeiftoa Iy earrier, $1.50; by nail,
X3.76.
Oies Prow. Building, Maynard Street,
'l ems iSeeal, 4901 Businese

with which Ann Arbor has been
favored this summer-learning long
parts-repeating scenes again and
again at midnight rehearsals, while
preparing in the meantime for the
play to follow. But the work was
done willingly, and done well.
The players are especially to be
congratulated on the securing of
Thomas Wood Stevens and Jean
Mercier, who were of equally great
value to the patrons of their plays
and the students who studied un-
der them. To them, to the stu-
dents, and to Valentine B. Windt,
director of the group, The Daily
extends thanks.

EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAUNG EDITOR
HAROLD 0. WARREN, JR.
)i*er1ai Direote, .......... tuineyW1
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
W. C~I~te, Carl Meloy
celail WEleanor Rairdon
Maeakees Marion Thornton
P. Cutler Showers

What Others Says

!I

l~1tams
BEER FOR
REVENUE

BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
A # a t ulnxsIl Ater .. Vernon Siahep
* unagr.. r........Oarl arx
4d*etising Manager........lackBunting
eeouste. Circulation......homas Muir
Night Editor-Sher M. Quraishi
SATURDAY, AUGUST 15, 1931

SWIFT
JUSTICE

W HEN Circuit Judge George W.
Sample sentenced Smith,Ol-
iver, and Blackstone Thursday
night to life imprisonment he pre-
scribed for the killers the maximum
punishment afforded by Michigan
law, and most citizens, though re-
gretting that the punishment did
not approach the brutality of the
crime, realized that Washtenaw and
Wayne County officials had brought
to a successful finish a case of
speedy justice that can scarcely be
equalled in the annals of crime.
Admittedly, the punishment is
not wholly satisfactory; obviously,
it can never be more than very
small comfort to the parents of the
victims to reflect that the slayers
of their children are safely behind
bars and no longer a menace to
society; yet the fact remains that
the law ran a swift, true course to
inflict its severest punishment on
the murderers.
"How human beings could act as
you three have acted goes beyond
me," Judge Sample told the pris-
oners. "I can't imagine it. The
testimony made me heartsick-that
our highways and our places of
pleasure should have to be infest-
ed by such worms.
"Society has no place for them,
it never can. If they should live
to be 1,000 years old, they would
not be fit to come back. .. .
Small wonder that the interest
of the entire nation has been cen-
tered in Ann Arbor for the past
week, that newspapers as far away
as New England called by telephone
for stories of the atrocity, and that
milling thousands at court house
and jail attempted to punish, by
mob rule, the perpetrators of the
State's most horrible crime.
But regardless of the inadequate
severity of the punishment, the
speed and dispatch of the authori-
ties in apprehending the criminals,
once the complex and misleading1
clues began to shape into tangible
evidence, must be highly praised.
There was no dilly-dallying, no
compromise. Judge Sample com-
mended all those who took part in
the man-hunt but his commenda-'
tion, however sincere, could not
possibly have reflected the admir-
ation of those of us who watched
the rapid parade of events that
began Tuesday morning and term-
inated Thursday night. The mir-
aculously short period between the
time the crime was committed and
the minute the sentence was passed
should serve as a tremendously
powerful example of what can be
done with or ponderous legal ma-
chinery once it is set determinedly
into action.
That the moronic stupidity of the
killers made the work of the au-
thorities easier is not to be denied;
yet the unabated zeal with which
the case was handled from begin-
ning to end will remain forever to
the credit of Michigan's law en-
forcement agencies.
AN
APPRECIATION
A S THE summer draws to a close,
it is fitting that an expression
be made of the gratitude which Ann
Arbor drama patrons feel to the
Michigan Repertory players.
The group of student actors en-
rolled in Play production depart-
ment furnished seven entertaining
and professionally-staged dramas
during the Session, and it was not
an easy thing to do. It is not pre-
cisely a bed of roses-sweating un-
der grease-paint in the weather

(Daily Iowan)
One of the arguments being used
mn favor of legalized beer is that
it would turn in to the government
treasury a lot of needed revenue
of which it has been deprived un-
der the Volstead Act. This along
with the assertion that the present
"tremendous" cost of enforcement
machinery would be greatly lessen-
ed. It's an old story, but not nec-
essarily a good one.
The whole idea is based on a mis-
conception of the nature of taxa-
tion. Government does not exist
merely for the purpose of accumu-
lating revenue. Federal taxes are
levied as a means of making it pos-
sible for the government to carry
on the work of the various depart-
ments of federal administration.
This support, this revenue, comes
from the people of the nation, re-
gardless of the form in which it is
levied. The fact that the beer in-
dustry was outlawed meant only
that revenue formerly received
from a tax on its products was
thereafter received from a tax lev-
ied somewhere else. The people
still do the paying, and why beer
revenue is better than any other
sort of revenue it would be difficult
to show.
It is furthermore questionable
that the cost of law enforcement
would be greatly reduced with the
legalizing of beer. In pre-Volstead
days the government had to main-
tain a large staff for the enforce-
ment of revenue collection. There
is every reason to believe that the
force would have to be employed
again, to guarantee to the govern-
ment the revenue hailed as a re-
commendation for the return of
beer.
It is hard to believe that the
champions of legalized beer are
really anxious as they seem for
the government to have all this
supposedly "added" revenue. The
ranks of the liquor makers and dis-
pensers have always been overrun
with outlaws and law-evaders.
Their activities have too often been
connected with political graft
which of itself robbed the publie of
millions of dollars. To this the cost
in impoverished individual and
family life may still be added.
Beer has never yet offered any
assurance that it would be law-
abiding. When the accounts are
rendered on the question of beer
for revenue, the entries are not
all on the credit side.
SAFETY
SUGGESTIONS
(Niles Daily Star)
Three elements must be consid-
ered in highway accidents - the
car, the road, and the driver. Ac-
cording to Sidney J. Williams of the
National Safety Council, each of
these elements sometimes predom-
inates, but in general the car
is a lot safer than the highway,
and the highway is a lot safer
than the driver.
Statistics of past years cast in-
teresting light on the accident sit-
ua-tion. Traffic accidents among
school children are on the decrease,
while those among adults are on
the increase, thus proving the val-
ue of safety education in schools.
During the last three years the
number of commercial vehicles in-
volved in fatal accidents has gone
down 19 per cent, while the num-
ber of private cars so involved has
gone up 37 per cent. This reflects
the beneficial results of education
and supervision of drivers by their
employers. An intensive study has

shown that states with a standard
drivers' license law have had 29
per cent fewer fatalities than they
would have had if the annual in-
crease had continued at the same
rate as in non-license states. Also,
statistics show that recent increas-
es have been entirely in the coun-
try. In cities the battle is being
waged on even grounds.
Mr. Williams has put forward
nine suggestions ror reducing ac-
cidents. These include magazine,

newspaper, radio and other pub-
licity to impress the individual driv-
er with his responsibility-a stand-
ard drivers' license law, rigidly en-
forced, in every state-psychologi-
cal studies of the mental or person-
al causes of accidents-regular in-
spection of all vehicles-a safety
organization in every community
to conduct educational work and
back up the. constituted authori-
ties-and to make "cheating" in
traffic as unfashionable as "cheat-
ing" at cards. These are sound sug-
gestions, to which every state and
city would do well to give serious
consideration.
WISCONSIN'S
PLAN
(Daily Illini)
Curricular changes splitting the
periods of study into two-year sec-
tions and segregating the various
affiliated departments of the Col-
lege of Letters and Science will of-
ficially go into effect at Wisconsin
this fall. The changes, adopted in
1930, are planned to give greater
freedom to many serious students
who enter the university and at
the same time substantially raise,
the standard of work.
Briefly, the changes jprovide (for
placement and attainment exam-
inations for freshmen at the open-
ing of each academic year, the re-
sult to determine the classes in
which the student is permitted or
required to enroll. In addition, stu-
dents who would normally be can-
didates for the bachelor of arts de-
gree in 1934 or thereafter will have
to prove their ability in foreign lan-
guage by passing attainment ex-
aminations rather than by mere
accumulation of high school units
or college credits in language.
At the end of the first two years
students under this plan become
candidates for the title of Junior
Graduate in Liberal Studies. Their
university records will classify the
students into three groups: those
whose point-credit ratio is 1.3 or
higher; those whose point credit
ratio is 1.1 but less than 1.3; and
those whose point-credit ratio is
less than 1.1. Members of the first
group are automatically admitted
to the junior class; those in the
second class may apply for admis-
sion, and may present written rec-
ommendations from membbrs of
the teaching staff; but those in the
third class, with a few exceptions,
will be excluded from going into
the junior year. Members of this
last group, however, may re-apply
after a year's lapse or after having
completed a semester of satisfact-
ory work at some other institution.
Major studies are to be selected at
the opening of the junior year.
There is no doubt the plan has
been carefully thought out; it gives
the serious-minded, ambitious stu-
dent opportunity to forge ahead
of his duller classmates, and at the
same time eliminates those less in-
cined to seek college with the sole
intention of study. The number of
those fail to make the grade in the
first trial coming back after a year
of absence or a semester of work
at another college or university,
would, in our opinion, be relatively
small.
The foreign language require-
ment, too, is a decided step in the
right direction. With world travel
and international relations becom-
ing almost daily more and more
commonplace, the time is not far
off when a command of at least one
foreign language will be required of
anyone who wishes to be classed

as an educated person. But we
wonder if the plan will work out as
successfully as its originators hope.
One of our professors used to in-
sist, jokingly, of course, but with an
undercurrent of seriousness, that
youngsters did not come to college
to be "educated." A few, perhaps,
had that ideal in mind when they
entered, but the majority were seek-
ing same place in which to spend
four pleasant years - and what.
"education" they carried back was
absorbed in spite of themselves. And
another Ph.D held the opinion that
nobody's education was complete
until he had flunked at least one
course. And under the plan out-
lined above the fiunker would have
but little chance of meeting the
raised scholastic requirements, un-
less his other marks were consid-
erably above the average.
We can see where such a plan
might be inaugurated here. But it
is hardly logical to assume that the
average student's attitude will un-
dergo a sudden change, and that he
will "go in" for education with the
same vigor that he at present dis-
plays for athletics or politics. And
until that happy day educators can
only formulate such plans, and
then hope - like everything - that
they "take." Just the same, Wis-
consin's plan will bear watching,:
and we in turn hope - like every-
thing - that we're wrong, and that
at works - like everything.

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"THE APPEAL OF JESUS TO
THE BEST IN MEN"
Bishop Francis J. McConnell
Of New York City.

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
10:00 A. M.-Brotherhood of St.
Andrew's Bible Class, Harley Kline
leader.
11:00 A. M.-Summer Kindergarten.
Miss Eunice Campbell director.

11:00 A. M.-Morning
Sermon by the Rev.
Mann.
Tuesday open house at
from four to six.

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson. Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor

I. .1

Prayer andE
Duncan E.
Harris Hall

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning
ice. Sermon topic: "Soul."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:30 P. M.-Wednesday Evening
testimonial meeting.

it

11

10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Speaker, Rev. Wylie Young of
Toledo, Ohio.
6:00-7:00 P. M.-Social Hour and
Young People's Meeting at the
Church House, 1432 Washtenaw
Ave.
ThE
FIRST BAPTIST CHIURCHI
E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister for
Students.
9:30 A. M.-The Church School.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Rev. J. V. Fradenburg will preach.
NO OTHER SERVICES

iT

BE
CONSISTENT
IN
YOUR
RELIGION
ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARLY

The Reading Room, 10 and 11
State Savings Bank Building, is open
daily from 12 to 5 o'clock, except
Sundays and legal holidays.

"

I .f r1~j

MAJESTIC
STARTS TODAY
2:00-3:40-7:00-9:00
here he i THE NEW
Ro e rs
in
r
YOU FE EL
based on deor Ad's
celebrated stage comedy
with
FMB
Dorsay
Lucien
FOX Littleield
Modern as a night club I
Funny as a family album I
ALSO
HEARST NEWS
COLORTONE REVUE

ON THE
STAGE
COMING IN PERSON
SUNDAY, AUG. 16
30 Beautiful Girls
MISS EASTERN
MICHIGAN
AND THE
BATHING GIRLS
0F11931
A Snappy-Peppy Revue
3 0 Dainty, charming3a
Bathing Beauties3
Classy Dances
Special Song Hits
ON THE SCREEN
MARION DAVIES
in
"Five and Ten"
And Bobby Jones in
"Trouble Shots"

COMPOSER OF
LA BOHEME, LA TOSCA
and MADAMA BUTTERFLY
Wrote his
greatest Operas
with a
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STAGE SHOW ONE
DAY ONLY

MICHIGAN

NOVELTY

ME

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices
FREEMAN'S
DINING RO
Lunches 40c, Dinners 60c
Sunday Dinner 75c
ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM*HILL AUDITORIUM
CLASSIFIED ADS PAY

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