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August 15, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-08-15

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8ATURDAY, AUGUST 15, 1931
TORS SPONSORED
BY SESSION DRAN
LARGE ATTENDANCE
1,020 Participate in Ten Trips
Offered, 330 More Than
Last Summer.
MANY VISIT PUT-IN-BAY
Repetition of Ford Airport and
Greenfield Village Excursion
Proves Necessary.
Summer Session excursions this
year attracted a record attendance,
Carlton F. Wells, secretary of the
Session, announced yesterday, 1020
taking part in ten special trips.
Last year only 690 took the excur-
sions offered, while 741 participated
in 1929.
One excursion, a visit to Ford
airport, Greenfield village, and the
recently completed Dearborn inn,
proved so popular that a repetition
of the trip was offered for students
who were unable to get facilities
for the first.
Unusual interest was shown in
the bus and steamer trip to Put-in-
Bay, 250 students taking the ex-
cursion. Last year's number for the
tour was 110. Scenic and geologi-
cal points of interest were inspect-
ed on the island under the direc-
tion of Prof. William H. Hobbs, head
of the geology department. Pro-
fessor Hobbs also directed a trip to
Niagara Falls and vicinity, which
included a complete tour of the
gorge and various scenic points, as
-well as a study of the important
geological features. Twenty-five
persons took this excursion.
On the last excursion of the sum-
mer, 160 students visited the new
Michigan State prison, near Jack-
son. Guard captain M. S. Hatch
conducted the party through the
57-acre inclosure where 5,600 crim-
inals are housed. Captain Hatch
also gave a lecture on prison prob-
lems.
Because of the great interest
shown in past years, two trips to
the Ford plant at River Rouge were
scheduled. One hundred forty stu-
dents took the first excursion and
60 the second. Though the fac-
tories were not operating on a full
schedule, the excursionists saw most
of the major features.
Sixty-five students visited Detroit
on the fifth tour of the summer.
They inspected the Detroit News'
plant, the Institute of Arts, the
Fisher building, radio station WJR,
and the Public Library, and also
visited Belle Isle.
At the General Motors Proving
ground, engineers conducted 55
students over the roads where per-
formance tests are made and
through the extensive experimental
laboratories.
The first excursion of the sum-
mer, a free tour of Ann Arbor and
vicinity, was attended by 80 stu-
dents. Ann Arbor luncheon clubs
provided cars for the trip.
:-All of the excursions except the
two of geological interest, directed
by Professor Hobbs, were conducted
by Wells.

T- B Br~m I3 D I

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_ ____________

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Reported Improving

Associatea Presa Photo
Paul Von Hindenburgh,
President of Germany, who is re-
ported recovering from indisposi-
tions caused by his advanced age
and the serious situation of his
country, which looks to him for
help.
WOMEN- HOLD FINAIJ'
PARTY OFSUMMER
Fifty Persons Attend Supper
at Which Sports Winners
Are Announced.
As the "grand finale" to the sum-
mer's work in the physical edu-
cation department, all of the people
who have been participating in the
summer's activities held a splash
party at the Intramural pool last
night, which was followed by a
supper at the Women's Athletic
building.
About fifty people attended and
during the supper, the winners of
all of the various sports were an-
nounced. They were: Jean Ber-
ridge, who placed first in the swim-
ming meet with Mary Kary second,
Margaret Seeley, third, and Mary
Renshaw, fourth in that event. In;
the tennis, Alise Westedarp came
first in the intermediate tourna-
ment with Mary Renshaw as run-
ner-up. Jean Berridge placed first
in the beginners' tournament with
Ula Trodhal as runner-up.
The golf tournament will not be
finished until next week but Miss
Marie Hartwig announced that
there has been a bigger turn-out
for it this year than ever before,
with fifty people registered in the
preliminaries.
Dr. Margaret Bell, director of
physical education for women an-I
nounced yesterday that this has
been the most successful summer
of that department's career with
about 1000 women participating int
the various activities.I

Sports V.oman
As a result of the tennis finals
played yesterday morning on the
courts at Palmer field, Alise West-
endarp and Jean Berridge are the
new tennis champions.
Miss Westendarp defeated Mary
Renshaw (6-1) (3-6) (6-2) in the
last round of the intermediate
players tournament. The match
was marked by a good quality of'
tennis on the part of both players
with Miss Westendarp showing an
excellent serve and general good
form throughout. Miss Renshaw
was the only woman entered in
that tournament who was not en-
rolled in one of the summer tennis
classes.
Thefinal match of the begin-
ners' tournament, Miss Berridge de-
feated Ula Trodhal (6-4) (6-1). In
the first set of this match, the two
players seemed fairly even showing
about the same calibre of playing,
and each won on her own serving.
However, Miss Berridge won the
second match more easily as her
playing was consistently better
than her opponents who had tired
before the second game was finish-
ed, in spite of the rather good form
which she showed throughout.
Fifty players are entered in the
qualifying rounds of the golf tour-
nament which have been going on
for the past two weeks. However,
just the sixteen women who turn
in the lowest scores will be left in
the semi-finals, four of whom will
enter the finals which are to be
held on the University course next
Tuesday.
The last regular semi-weekly open
swim which the women's physical
education department has been
sponsoring every Tuesday and
Thursday evening in the Union
pool will be held next Tuesday eve-
ning.
The regular swimming, golf, and
tap dancing classes will close for
the semester next Tuesday night.
FOURTH VICTIM DEAD
BATTLE CREEK, Aug. 14-(P)-
The death of Albert Latta, 30, late
Thursday brought to four the fatal-
ities resulting from a fire which
destroyed a garage here during the
morning.
The victims were trapped in the
building and were burned before
the horrified gaze of hundreds of
spectators outside, who could see
them through a plate glass show
window. The window became mal-
leable from the heat and resisted
the frantic efforts of those trapped
within the blazing building to es-
cape.
Firemen finally smashed the
glass with bricks and rescued Lat-
ta, an employe, who was standing
ankle deep in burning timbers from
the collapsed roof. Floyd Carlisle,
40, also an employe and Robert
Finton, 20, and Gradie Ervin, 23,
spectators were dead.
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
-Women students here recently
demanded that the university es-
tablish smoking rooms for their use.

Methodist Leader Scheduled
Deliver Sermon at Local
Church Tomorrow.

to

Bishop Francis J. McConell, out-
standing religious leader, will
preach at the First Methodist Epis-
copal church tomorrow morning.
His subject will be "The Appeal to
the Best in Men."
Bishop McConnell has been called
one of the modern social prophets.
He is well-known nationally and
internationally as the president of
the Federal Council of Churches
and for his many contributions to
religious and secular magazines on
subjects of church and state. He
has written many religious books
and may be characterized as an in-
terpreter of Christianity. Among
his works are "The Diviner Imman-
nence", -"Personal Christianity",
"Democratic Christianity" and "Is
God Limited?".
This past winter and spring Bish-
op McConnell has been in India
where he delivered the Barrows
Lectures and presidedat confer-
ences of the Methodist church. A
stay of several months in that
country enabled him to catch the
spirit of the great Indian National
movement which is so essentially
Christian in method and achieve-
ment.
Dr. McConnell, who is a native
of the State of Ohio, was educated
at Ohio Wesleyan and Boston uni-
versities. Following pastorates in
Massachusetts and in New York, he
was president of DePauw university
in Indiana for a number of years.
In 1912 he was elected to the epis-

BISHOP M'CONNELL
WILL SPEAK HERE

copacy of the Methodist Episcopal
church and in that administrative
capacity now has charge of the New
York city area.
The public is cordially invited to
attend the service which begins at
10:45 o'clock. The church is locat-
ed on the corner of State and
Washington streets.
LEAVES SPINSTERS FORTUNE
CHICAGO, Aug. 14-(IP)-Before
the snow flies, $2,500,000 is to be
put to work in behalf of "elderly
unmarried ladies of gentle birth
and breeding who have reached the
age of 60 years."
This was announced by the trus-
tees of the estate of the late Mrs.
Suzanna King Bruwaert, whose will
provided the $2,500,000 for the
erection and endowment of a home
for aged spinsters.
TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHING
and
A speciality for twenty4
years.
Prompt service . . . Experienced oper.-
ators . . . Moderate rates.
O. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615
I CARTTER'S I

FINAL
AUGUST
ClIearance
SUMMER
HATS
29c
4 for $1.00
In order to clearaway our
summer stock for the new fall
hats we are offering all sum-
mer hats except the more ex-
pensive panamas at this great
sacrifice.
Saturday 9-1 only
rELTS
In Pastel
Shades
$1.00"
"'Your. Shop"

m
0
N
E
A
T

A 6100DINNER?

0
A
K
L
A
N
D

DINNER 45c

p

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SOCIETY

11

Betsy Barbour house sponsored
its last social affair of the summer
session evening before last in the
form of a facultydinner. The af-
fair was informal and the follow-
ing were the guests of honor:
Dean Huber, Professor and Mrs.
Anning, Professor Bradshaw, Mrs.
Rhead of the School of Music, Pro-
fessor and Mrs. Brumm, Professor
and Mrs. Barker, Miss Marian Mc-
Kinney, Miss Ruth Campbell, and
Miss Marie Hartwig.
Honoring the women who will
receive degrees at the end of Sum-
mer School, Helen Newberry Dor-
mitory entertained at an informal
dinner Wednesday evening. Miss
Roxie Andrews, house president
had charge of the arrangements,
and an interesting program was
given. A gift which was a hand-
some silver tea tray was presented
to the house by the girls.
* * *
Mosher Jordan Halls held their
last Thursday afternoon tea yes-
terday afternoon. These teas have
been a weekly event of the sum-
mer session. Entertainment was
furnished by the presentation of the
play, "The Young Idea" by the resi-
dents of the dormitory. Mrs.,Ethel
McIntosh was the director, and this
was the third presentation of the

IT'S TIME TO BLOSSOM FORTH
IN FALL FASHIONS
EVERYBODY'S doing it ... you
know-trying to be the first to
have the thrilling new Fall togs. If
you want to join the contest, we
suggest that you come here, because
no matter how finicky you are . . .
or how demanding of exclusive indi-
viduality. .. you'll find it here in new
frocks . . . coats . . . hats . . . acces-
sories . . . and as usual, we insist on
asking low prices.

retain ALL their health value!
WAX string beans, for example, are cooked
electrically with only from @4to 4 inch of
water in the bottom of the utensil! There
is no need to use more: the beans are steam-
cooked, conserving all their natiral, nour-
ishing health values. Simmering over gen
electric heat, their natural tenderness is re-
tained. By cooking electrically with a mini-
mum of water, vegetables have a fuller
flavor and keep their entire health value.
An excess of water, afterwards poured into
the sink (the result of cooking on an or-
dinary stove), deprives the housewife of the
ery value for which she pays her money.
Has Your Kitchen Stove These
ElCTROCHEF Features?
L As clean k wchen, a dean stove-4w sot, nofins
2. Cool cooking-summer and winter. 3. Full flavor
ookin.gin healthful food values. Exato.
(X~~r1-10bakig disappoininent
nDETROIT EDISON co.

ELECTROCHEF-COOKED VEGETABLES

seey fg :7 ah

Model Parade
Saturday 3 to 4 p. m.

Second Floor

Phone 4161

00,0

6.

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