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August 02, 1931 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1931-08-02

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TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, AUGUST 2, 1931

MirT H E SU M ER MIC IG N D IL

ShL A t I .I

PtMi esry morning except Monday
DO*te nviertat mmaer Sm ss by the
In Ctrl oStdnt Publications.
The Asseefated Press is exclusively entitled
e the ane for republication of all news diii.
01*4.. edited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and the local news published
hErea. Ali rhts of republication of special
d0,pte06e here are also reserved.
Datered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post
effee as second class matter.
$ubscription by carrier, $1.50; by mail,
X1.76.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbr, Michigan.
Telephone: Editorial, 4925; Business
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD 0. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director........... Gurney Williams
ASSOCIATEaEDITORS
. w. Carpenter Carl Meloy
.. R. Chubb Sher M. Quraishi
larbara Nal Eleanor Rairdon
Susan Manchester, Marion Thornton
P..Cutler Showers
BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
Assistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
ontrats Manager .........C...Carl Mart
Advertising Manager........ ack Bunting
Acontes.Circulation.homas Muir
Night Editor-C. W. CARPENTER
SUNDAY, AUGUST 2, 1931
MORE
DELAY
IT IS disappointing to note that
a certain amount of shilly shal-
lying has crept into the Capone
case. Judge Wilkerson no doubt ex-
ercised his best judgement in post-
poning the case until September
but the effects of the uncompro-
mising attitude of the federal court
which characterized the proceed-
ings up until yesterday have been
.ost.
We had hoped that Gangster Ca-
pone would be speedily sentenced
and put out of harm's way and that
this action would have its tangible
effect on the activities of other
criminals. We continually forget
that legal machinery is ponder-
ous and that the administration of
it calls upon the utmost patience
of those on the outside as well as
those participating in it.
It is sincerely to be hoped, how-
ever, that the court will resume its
work with unabated zeal when the
case is again called and that the
the end result will justify the ac-
claim of the entire country.
RED CROSS
RESOURCES
UNDER its national charter the
Red Cross organization is bar-
red from assisting in unemploy-
ment, but Chairman Payne's recent
statement that individual chapters
may exercise their own judgment in
the matter makes it appear that
the activities of this great agency
may well be extended to include re-
lief work for the jobless.
Fifty cents from each member-
ship goes to national headquarters,
the remainder goes into the cof-
fers of local chapters. In some
areas frequently afflicted with
floods, droughts, and other calami-
ties likely to cause a heavy drain
on the funds of the local Red Cross
chapters, it is easily supposed that
chapter treasuriesare over-burden -
ed; in many other districts com-
paratively free from natural haz-
ards it is quite as easily assumed.
that some amount of unemploy-
ment relief could be carried on;
without serious detriment to chap-

ter finances._
Chairman Payne stated emphat-
ically that local chapters should
not involve national headquarters
in any steps taken in this direction,
and added that exhaustion of lo-:
cal resources would be a matter
only of local concern but this
should not discourage many chap-
ters from planning a reasonable'
amount of unemployment relief-
taking care always to maintain an
emergency fund for the type of'
work for which the organization
was primarily designed.j
The Red Cross has always been
known as an antidote for human
misery and it is therefore logical
to expect that the organization
should cooperate with other relieft
agencies in steps toward lesseningt
the great amount of sufferingc
caused by the depression. Local
chapters might not feel free in tak-(
ing too active a hand in the admin-f
istration of aid to those made des-r
titute by the financial slump; how-s
ever, a proper budgeting of localr
resources should yield a consider-r
able amount of money for thist
purpose.b
-0-i
A government cencus of motorm
cars in the country shows there is
one automobile to every 4.9 per-a
sons in the United States. The s

I1What Others Say

if

F v

AN AERIAL
CONTEST
(New York Times)
Between the performances of the
world fliers and the Arctic voyage
of Dr. Eckener the choice is easy.
Boardman and Polando did make a
non-stop dash that probably broke
the airplane record and confirmed
the mathematical prediction of
French physicists that a plane car-
rying the maximum charge of fuel
can cover about 5,000 miles. Hern-
don and Pangborn, after battling
with headwinds and groping
through fog, landed in Wales and
pushed on. What if the record of
Post and Gatty is eventually eclips-
ed? The world learns little after
reading the old tale of mists that
obscure the ocean and make its
crossing something like a miracle.
Again the familiar conclusion must
be drawn that transatlantic avia-
tion can become a commercial re-
ality only when radio devices are
so far perfected that pilots may
thread their way through fogs au-
tomatically and unerringly.
The contrast between a dash
around the world and the Graf Zep-
pelin's performance is striking.
Eckener set out on a purely scien-
tific expedition carefully planned by
his sponsors, the Aeronautical Soci-
ety. After Peary and Byrd the Pole
lost much of the sentimental inter-
est that once clung to its attain-
ment. The German mission nar-
rowed down to the more useful task
of gathering new facts about the
Arctic.
Despite the fogs by which he was
beset, Dr. Eckener seems to have
carried out the program laid out for
him with almost military precision.
The Malygin was to be reached. He
settled down beside her, transferred
his mail exactly as prescribed, and
rose again because ice floes made
a protracted stay dangerous. Only
in meeting Professor Urantzev,
voluntarily marooned on an obscure
island, did Eckener fail, and then
because the atmospheric conditions
were against him.
But the wealth of geographic in-
.formation the Graf Zeppelin brings
back. The Northland territory
proves to be vaster than was sus-
pected-larger than Novava Zemva.
On Taimyr Penninsula is discovered
a mountain range which had es-
caped earlier explorers. As they
brush the clouds the scientists on
board the airship sweep thousands
of square miles with a glance. The
islands of Albert Edward and Franz
Josef Land stand out as they real-
ly are-parts of an enormous pen-
insula, although with what main-
land connected we have still to
learn. In a few hours is discovered
more of the unknown Arctic than
could be expected from years of
painful footwork. So the Graf Zep-
pelin returns, not with any broken
long-distance airship record, al-
though she must ha e covered over
5,000 miles, but with an intangible
treasure that justifies Dr. Eckener'
faith in her scientific uses.
THE BETTER
WAY
(The Daily Iowan)
Chicago teachers are, of course,
the first to point out that the pro-
posed reduction in their salaries
would not correct the fundamental
cause of the city's financial ills and
would assuredly lower educational,
standards. The teachers are per-
haps the only ones who will pre-
sent organized opposition to the

move, but what they say carries
more with it than the primary im-
pulse to save their salaries, and it
deserves reinforcement.
A resident of Iowa is in no posi-
tion to discourage such a move to
cut Chicago teachers' salaries two
and one-half per cent, but he may
be able to prevent the Chicago idea
from becoming an epidemic.
Schools are the natural enemy of
crime, crooked politics, dishonesty,
incompetence, and ignorance which
are combining to run Chicago into
the red. The practical weapon of
these forces is an outworn, inade-
quate system of taxation.
Thus, by cutting school expenses,
Chicago is seriously impairing ef-
ficiency of the insitutions which
must resort to inferior teachers and
at the same time neglecting tax
reform. Reversing the procedure
might work a temporary hardship
but would produce immeasurably
better results in the long run. And
it is for future generations that the
wisest people build.
Chicago may well serve as an ex-
ample to other communities that a
school systems should be the last

OASTED-ROLL
ALLY " 1
RUND,
ELLOWS
It isn't as though bicyclists didn't
have enough troubles (ours is main-
ly how to get off once we're on-
we usually have to hit something
to keep from pedaling around in-
definitely). We've just found out
that the University police force
won't let you ride on the campus
sidewalks.
A pretty pass, we call it. How
about inalienable rights of man, Mr.

E 1. .f1

About Books.

BALLYHOO:
A Periodical

N EWEST among the crowded
lists of popular magazines is
BALLYHOO, a glorious satire on
the absurdities of the contempo-
rary advertisement. The field cov-
ered by BALLYHOO is a familiar
one to Editor Norman Anthony, who
perfected the technique of burlesque
while editor of JUDGE magazine,
three or four years ago. At that
time JUDGE enjoyed a sudden in-
crease mn circulation each time

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices
DINIING ROOM
Lunches 40c, Dinners 60c
Sunday Dinner 75c
ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

,-

cil,
Anthony brought out a burlesque
number, but the advertisers ob-
jected strenuously and Anthony's
Istyle was cramped by business de-
partment restrictions. The outcome
is BALLYHOO, two issues of which
have appeared to date. Both are
minus paid advertisements but pro-
Rolls' Official Bicycle. fuse in full-page advertisements for
D.V.D. underwear; Hesterfield, Old
President? How about athletics Cold and Ducky Wucky cigarettes;
for all? Anyway, Rolls is not go- Clioquot ginger ale; Blisterine and
ing to stand calmly by and watch Ibana toothpastes; Freshman's
the Freedom of the World trampled Yeast, and Zimmons beds. There
upon by the great bloody sword of i is no text worthy of notice-An-
Tyranny. No sir. 1 thony believes written material in
Join our parade of demonstra- a humorous magazine is a conces-
tion! It will form in front of the sion to the magazine's business de-
main library, at noon, behind the partment, not to its readers.
Rolls Official Bicycle (which can be Doubtful of the success of an ad-
recognized from its picture above) less magazine, publishers were sur-
procede down the Diagonal, circle prised by Anthony's recent an-
the campus twice, and end up at nouncement that newsstand sales
alone are making the venture pay;
that the first issue of 150,000 cop-
ies was sold out in five days; and
that several advertisers have in-
dicated a desire to buy space in
future issues. Some 250,000 copies
of the current number rolled off
the presses of George Delacorte,
Jr., Anthony's backer, and more
than 500 subscriptions have been
r received from readers who refused
to take seriously Anthony's request
that readers should NOT fill in and
mail a subscription blank-"Coupon
for Your Inconvenience"-found in
New Rolls Bldg. the body of the book.
the New Rolls bldg., where tea will Anthony was charged with "be-
the ewd Rtraying a trust" when the first is-
be served. sue of BALLYHOO-poking fun at
Our one reservation is that WE advertisers and contemporary mag-
shall not attend. A pretty figure zines-appeared, but his ridicule of
we'd cut, leading the parade into modern sales appeals, silly slogans,
trees all the time. and nonsensical advertising claims
*TH *P NEis timely; and the public response
WHAT THIS CAMPUS NEEDS proves that his hunch was a good
DEPARTMENT one. G. W.

t
--

,
:'"
y,

NOW
PLAYING

2:00-3:40-7:00-9:00
Thrilling! Vital!

l V
rr f
t c x f'
.,

¢ r ,
f ':.
.' <; .
, . .
;

ramatic*
RJN arbara.
Jn
NIGHT
NURSE
BEN LYON
JOAN BLONDELLI

ALSO
HEARST WORLD NEWS
"THE SALESMAN"-COMEDY ACT
Wed.-Kay Francis "Transgression"

MONDAY AUG
PACKARD ST. GROUNDS

I

What this campus needs, it has
been pointed out, is a nice campan-
ile. A couple of years ago there was
a lot of agitation for one, and
everybody thought it would be a
slick thing to have, just sort of
standing around. But nothing was
done, and so we feel that it's high
time we revived the project.
We've had the Rolls staff artist
draw up a design, and herewith
submit it for the aproval of who-
ever has charge of building cam-
paniles on this man's campus.
u r
Proposed Campanile.
* * *
A GENTLEMAN OF PARTS
By Flptsch Whoofle.
Part The First
Fitchworthy Potts stirred uneas-
ily in his slumber, knocking part of
it to the floor by accident with a
loud bang. The noise awoke him.
"Well," said Fitchworthy, for he
was that sort of a chap, "that's
odd. I could have sworn I saw a
man climbing in that window."
The bedroom door swung open
and in burst a lithe young maid of
some seventeen summers with just
the trace of a twinkle in her eye.
"Father!" she cried, flinging her-
self to the floor by the bed.
"Am I?" queried Fitchworthy rub-
bing his eyes, and then he added
lamely, "but you shouldn't have
come in like this just the same."
And then he limped over to the
piano.
" .... He limped over to the piano."
"But father," said the girl, "you
are my father-aren't you?"
"If only I knew,". he murmered

I Music & Drama

IA)% Ait J .~ L'.l 1±IZ ±±OI 1JiL.J. ULa
W CeS. l ms aner1noui, ivi. a t -iii.Y
r etwier, piaills, anu ivi. riemiew l
usoorne, organist, win join ±rues
in a program to ie given ab : i
in ti Auditorium. Mr. eietener
ana ir. Osporne are respectively
pupils of Guy Maier and Palmer
Christian and both have appeared
irequently in the last two years in
public recitals in Ann Arbor.
The program for their concert
this afternoon follows:
Fantasia in G Minor Bach
Prelude Schmitt
Toccata "Thou Art the
Rank" Mulet

1
7
i
r
L
T
J
E
f
i
I
E

THE SENSATION OF
TWO CONTINENTS
THE REAT< 'AND THE
D NEWLY
W IN~ C, :::.f l/ADDED SPECTACLE
ACTUALLY SHOT
THROUGH SPACE , A
WITH VIOLENT
VELOCITY FROM .::/~N T"
THE MOUTH OF
A MONSTER OTHER REMARKABLE FEATURES INCLUDING
CANNON:::.CLYDE BEATTYand his 32savaoe beasts
Y DAILY 2AND 8RM.
DOORS OPEN
1 AND'7 P.M.
DOWNTOWN TICKET SALE AT PECK'S DRUG STORE
106 SOUTH MAIN STEET

Mr. Osborne
Sonata in B Minor
Mr. Fletcher

.LVl UiG {7

Liszt

Cantilena McKinley
Finale (Symphony No. 1)
Vierne
* * *
The program Tuesday will be
opened by a sonata for violoncello
and piano played by Mr. Pick and
Mr. Brinkman. Prof. Hamilton of
the voice faculty will then offer
two arias from Haendel and Leon-
cavallo and several negro spirituals.
Prof. Besekersky will then close the
concert with a group of five violin
solos. The program in full is as
follows:
Sonata for Violoncello and
Piano Voormolen
Modere (Prelude)
Menuet triste
Tres vite (La Danse de Con-
chita)
Mr. Pick and Mr. Brinkman
Ombre mai fu from
"Xerxes" Haendel
Vestion la glubba from
"I Pagliacci" Leoncavallo
By and By Burleigh
Oh! Didn't it Rain Burleigh
Steal Away Fisher
De Ole Ark's a Moverin Guion
Knotting Moffat
Cavatina Cui
Bureau euinn

INTRODUCING
GREATER MOVIE SEASON
AUGUST 2-29
Two Great Stars In
One Great Screen
Triumph
.
Blondes Are
His Weakness.
And a great surrounding bill
BOBBY JONES KRAZY KAT
"THE BRASSIE" RODEO DOUGH"

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