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August 02, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-08-02

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 2, 1931

T2M SUMMR NaOMGAN DAILY

PAW Tali

SUNDAY, AUGUST 2, 1931 THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY Fm -

BATTLE EXPECTED'
ONAPPORTIONMENT
OF STATE'S TAXES
Struggle Between Urban, Rural
Districts on Valuation Will
Be Revived, Belief.
COMMISSION ASKS CUT
County Representatives to Get
Hearings Before Board
of Equalization.
LANSING, Aug.1-(IP)-One of the
bitterest contests in many years
over the apportionment of the state
tax burden is in prospect in the
next few weeks.
Because of sharpy reduced real
property market values in both ur-
ban and rural centers, the old dis-
pute as to whether agricultural or
industrial counties are bearing an
unfair share is expected to be forc-
fully revived. The state tax com-
mission Monday will recommend to
the state board of equalization the
apportionment of the taxable valu-
ation by counts. The board, in turn,1
will hold hearings at which county
representatives may protest the
valuations proposed by the commis-
sion.
The commission will recommend
a decrease in the state valuation
but this will be relatively unimpor-
tant. The manner in which the cut
is made will be highly important.
Indications are it will be almost a
uniform drop, save in isolated in-
stances. A lower valuation simply
means the rate will have to be
higher as the same amount of
money must be raised regardless of
the valuation. The vital point to
the counties is whether their values
Are decreased more or less, in pro-
portion, than other counties.
Percentage Basis Used.
The state tax is collected on a
percentage basis. That is, the value
placed upon each county is a cer-
tain percentage of the state valua-
tion and that county must produce
that percentage of the state tax.
Thus a county now having 10 per
cent of the total valuation will be
in nowise benefited by a blanket cut
which reduces the state valuation
but still leaves that county having
10 per cent of the lower valua-
tion. It is on the score of percent-
ages that the fight is expected to be
:waged.
Such counties as Oakland, Gen-
esee, Wayne, Macomb, and others
in which widely developed real es-
tate subdivisions have fallen radi-
cally in value are expected to con-
tend vigorously that their portion
of the state levy is excessive. They
probably will point to their tax de-
linquencies as evidence that they
are over assessed.
Twenty-nine per cent of the state
tax, or more than $8,000,000 of the
$29,500,000 levy, was unpaid July
1, acording to a report by O. B.
Fuller auditor general. Of the de-.
linquent total Wayne county had
$4,878,893, Oakland $763,154, Ma-
comb $274,459, Genesee $435,399
and Kent $162,962.
Farmers Seek Reduction.
To the pleas of the urban centers
the agricultural counties are ex-
pected to respond that they are as
hard hit. Low farm prices, lower
farm values and the admitted ina-
bility of many farmers to pay their

taxes will be arguments put for-
ward by their supervisors or other
representatives from rural commu-
nities. Lenawee county had a de-
linquency of $33,852, Montcalm
$17,034, Newaygo $11,651, and Tus-
cola $20,010.
The upper peninsula is scheduled
to seek lower apportionments. Pre-
vailing low prices for metals and
other elements will make up the
arguments from that portion of the
state.
The present state valuation is
$8,447,000,000. Indications are a
cut to around $8,000,000,00 may
be recommended by the commis-
sion.

Opens War on Gangs

LOW WIH KILLS OKFFICERS TO OPEN
FISH, KRULL SAYS. 1WORK HERE TODAY

Would Stop Inquiry

PITTSBURGH BISHOP
TALKS HERE TODAY
Herbert Welch, Once President
of Ohio Wesleyan University,
at Methodist Church.
"The Upward Look" will be dis-

James J. Walker,'
New York mayor, has answered
the recent shooting of five children
in a Harlem beer feud by ordering
a campaign of extermination
against all armed gangsters.
NEWI YORK POLICE
Detectives Cruise City, Ready
to Use Force; Shoot Five,
Killing One.
NEW YORK, Aug1-(-)-Sixteen
police cars, each carrying four de-
tectives armed with automatic shot-
guns, cruised the city today, to1
"meet with force," the gangsters1
responsible for the death of one,
and the wounding of two oth'ers in
two more outbreaks Friday.<
The automobile squads swept out
of a dozen police stations at 6 p.m.,1
and by midnight had sent five men
to hospitals, all suffering from bul-
let wounds. The five men were
shot while attempting hold-ups
Friday night. Two by a patrolman;
three others by one of the shotgun
squads.1
The fatal shooting was in Brook-
lyn. The other was in East 103rd
St., but a short distance from the
Harlem neighborhood where one
child was killed and four others
shot on Tuesday.
The Brooklyn killing ofGud
Fererri, a mild-mannered youth
who had no underworld connec-
tions, was blamed on racketeers by
police. He was evidently mistaken
for a man well known in the
clothing labor circles, which has
been terrorized by gangsters.
Sports Woman
Because of the large number of
players entering, there will be three
golf tournaments starting this
week; one for beginners, one for in-
termediates, and one for advanced
players.
Members of the golf classes are
required to participate and others
interested may sign up on the bul-
letin boards in either Barbour gym-
nasium or Palmer field house.
* * *
Ruth Campbell, of the women's
physical education department has
announced the program for the
meet which will be held at 7:30 o'-
clock Thursday night in the Union
pool.
BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Steet
Today 12 to 3, 5:30 do 7:
FRIED CHCKEN, COjNTRY
STYLE
CORN F) TTERS
MASHED POTATOES
CREAM GRAVY
FRUIT SALAD
SOc

Research Confirms O p i n io n,
University Fish Pathologist
Reports to State.
(Special to The Daily)
LANSING, Aug, 2.-The lack of
water and the low lake levels
which occurred at spawning time
this year are the reasons given by
the institute for fisheries research
of the University of Michigan for
the large numbers of fish deaths
reported from many inland lakes.
Examination of specimens of fish
sent to the laboratories at Ann
Arbor and observations made of
various inland lakes have confirm-
ed this opinion, Wendell H. Krull,
fish pathologist of the institute said
in a report.
The most noticeable single ab-
normal condition in the fish has
been the increased amount of fun-
gus. "This is in some way associ-
ated with the lack of water, but just
how is another question," the re-
port said.
Krull believes that spearing
through the ice may have had some
effect on later fungus attacks. "We
know, from specimens which have
been sent to us, that many fish are
injured in spearing, and fishermen
will not take the fish with "white
patches" on them. These are in-
jured fish which have fungused and
under cold water conditions will
live for a long time, during which
the fungus possibly disseminates
many spores which are capable of
germinating very rapidly when the
water is warmer."
The low water levels this year
have, in all probability, seriously
affected fish life. Since the water
level was low at the spawning time
of common fish found most abund-
antly in Michigan lakes, and since
they are particularly sensitive to
water conditions, their spawning
activities, no doubt, were interfered
with, even to the extent of making
some of the normal spawning beds
unavailable for fish. In Lake Mit-
chell, Wesford county, for instance,
the black bass did not occupy their
spawning beds this spring

Med. res.
The staff of instructors will in-
clued, in addition to Col. White,
Major Edwards and Capt. Custis,
Col. P. J. O'Shaugnessy. D.D., Ma-
jor C. M. Steese, O.D., chief of De-
troit ordnance office, Clair Upthe-
grove, professor of metallurgical en-
gineering at the University, major
specialists' reserve during the war,
Frank A. Mickle, major in the Or-
nance reserve, assistant professor
of mechanical engineering at the
University and first lieutenant in
the Ordnance department during
the war and John C. Brier, major
in the specialists' reserve, professor
of chemical engineering at the Uni-
versity and during the war engag-
ed in the manufacture of nitro-
benzene and other "intermediates"
used in the making of explosives.
Eight Courses Planned.
Eight different courses will be
given as follows: "Introduction to
Organization of the Army," Col.
O'Shaugnessy and Maj. Edwards;
"History and Description of Artil-
lery," Maj. Steese; "Properties of
Metals-Elementary," Col. White;
"Properties of Metals-Advanced,"
Maj. Upthegrove; "Explosives and
Loading," Maj. Brier; "Explosives
Laboratory," Maj Brier; "The Use
of Gauges in the Manufacture of
Artillery Ammunition," May. Mick-
le, and "Range Firing," Capt. Cus-
tis.

cussed by Bishop Herbert Welch,
I of Pittsburgh, at the First Metho-
dist Episcopal church this morning.
Dr. Welch, who is in charge of the
Pittsburgh area of the Methodist
Episcopal church, is a preacher of
wide experience.
Dr. Welch was graduated at Ohio
Wesleyan university, at Drew Theo-
logical seminary and at Oxford. He
began his ministry with a series of
pastorates in New York state and
James Cannon, Jr., in Connecticut, following which he
Bishop of the Methodist Episco-'went to the presidency of Ohio Wes-
pal church South, has applied for leyan university. He remained as
a supreme court writ to prevent head of this institution for 11 years
continuation of a Senate committee until his elevation to the episcopacy
inquiry into the $65,000 he is said in 1916.
to have received for use in the 1928
anti-Smith campaign.

Ordnance Department Members
to Come Here for Study
Under A. H. White.
(Continued from Page One)

Unions Thireater
With Genera
HAVANA, Aug. 1-(P)-
threatened today with
strike, called by union
with the National Labor
and scheduled to start A
Representatives of t
meeting secretly Friday
sued the strike call.I
alone the federation
members.

I

CARTTE

Owing to the limited size of the
local rifle range, situated three
miles west of the city on the Huron
river, only pistol, rifle and perhaps
machine-gun firing will be done.
TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHING
and

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years.
Prompt service , . . Experienced
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South State St. Phone

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GAS FOR HEAT
WHEREVER HEAT

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Aug. 3.
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In HavanaS T
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Pleasant
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Our special 50c
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And our 30c
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SOUTH

NIliSTATEII
ON I ~ RFTI

EAM

ENJOY A GOOD SANDY BEACH

Bathe in a spring fed lake. Excellent water
Diving swing, chutes and merry go rounds.
and surf boat rides.
OROOMES BATHING B
WHITMORE LAKE, MI
Open until 11:30 p. m.
Amusements Ref

equipment.
Speed boat
EACH
CH.
freshments

BO ILERS The automatically-controlled, gas-
steam boiler has won a place in ind
as surely as has the lever and the wheel
inventions of the primitive industrialist. Writ

the free book "Gas Heat in

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