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July 30, 1929 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-30

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PAGE EWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAIL\

TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1929

Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
I ntered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier. sr-go; by mail
0.00
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
LAWRENCE R. KmE
Editorial Director........Howard F. Shout
Women's Editor . ..... ....Margaret Eckels
City Editor ................Charles Askren
Books Editor............ Lawrence R. Klein
Sports Editor..........S. Cadwell Swanson
Night Editors

every attempt to make them con-
sider flying a normal and reason-
able matter.
However, it would be an extreme-
ly hard-headed public that could
not be convinced by a flight of ap-
proximately three weeks. It has
shown definitely that safety is de-
pendent solely on the improvement
and perfection of the machine, and
that that goal is not far from
achievement.
Most interesting, of course, is
the manner in which the two pilots
have held up under the strain, al-
though, as they themselves say,
they have experienced no great dis-
comfort and no loss of energy or
vitality in their flight. The human
machine seems to be holding its
own along with the one of metal,
and struts, and wires, and this, too,
offers encouragement to the cau-
tious public. Unquestionably, the
two flyers will have earned all the
reward which they have been
promised, and deserve as well the
tribute of the nation. Another
stride in the all-important industry
of aviation has been taken.
Germany has pointed the way
to the proper naval competition-
that of building faster merchant
ships.
Ex-president C. C. Little has sug-
gested a change of curriculum for
co-eds. We suggest a course or two
in cooking and at least one in
opening tins of food.
We offer you as an alternative
to listening to the Sunday sermon
over the radio, the reading of the
"Advice to the Lovelorn" columns
in any Sunday newspaper.

Howard ?. Shout
S. Cadwell Swanson
Charles Askr
Assistant
Ben Manson
Ross Gustin
Dorothy Magee
Paul Showers
Deirdre McMullan

Walter Wilds
Harold Warren
en
L-dru Davis
Margaret Harris
William Mahey
Marguerite Henry
Rhea Goudy

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAWRENCE E. WALKLEY
Assistant Business Manager............Vernor Davis
Publications Manager ...............Egbert Davis
Circulation Manager...........Jeanette Dae
Accounts Manager.............................Noah Bryant
TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1929
Night Editor HAROLD WARREN
SWEETS AND SENATORS
The House rate on the sugar tar-
iff seems destined for rejection by
the Senate finance committee, but
raised is but the calm before the
storm if present indications mean
the dissension which that rate has
anything.
The finance committee plans to
offer for the consideration of the
Senate and the public a "sliding
scale" on sugar which will, it is
announced. place that commodity
in American homes at from five
and one-half to six cents a pound.
The new scale has been prepared.
by Senator Smoot and is under-
stood to have the approval of the
president. But the opposition is
prepared for the Smoot offering,
and under the able leadership of
Senators Borah and McMaster is
expected to criticize it both for' be-
ing a "sliding scale" and for be-
ing a scale at all.
The real worry of the august leg-
islators is the matter of public
opinion. The sugar tariff more
than any of the thousand other
items on the tariff bill seems to be
arousing a great deal of popular
interest, and it is feared that a
"housewife rebellion" against the
increased price of sugar in the re-
tail market will have disastrous ef-
fects on the next elections. This,
of course upsets the senatorial
equanimity asenothing else could.
Certainly the American sugar-
grower needs protection from the
foreign producer, but the question
is one of methods and not of pur-
pose. Borah and McMaster are ex-
pected to advocate a direct subsidy
to the grower in this country rath-
er than a high tariff. They point
out that of the $84,000,000 added to
the public's sugar bill only $15,400,-
000 will go to the sugar growers, the
rest finding its way to the "island
growers" and to the federal treas-
ury. Whether all this is true or
not, it furnishes food for thought,
for there is a certainty that the
gentlemen leading the opposition
have considerable basis for their
arguments. However, the "sliding
scale" seems to be much sounder
both economically and politically
than the single standard offered by
the House. It is more adaptable to
the changing conditions which may
arise in the industry, and it of-
fers some promise of a lower re-
tail prce.
At any rate, the Senate will be
certain to approve a method of sub-
sidizing the sugar growers-wheth-
er it is direct or indirect-which
will bring about the most favorable
reaction on the part of the voters,
the most favrable, at least, that
any tariff could.
ENDURANCE
Dale Jackson and Forest O'Brine,
two American young men, are suc-
ceeding in centering the attention
of the world on "safe aviation.,,
This has been the aim of aviation

enthusiasts since flying first became
practical, but it can be stated with
considerable assurance that until
the present flight of the St. Louis

They talk about heat waves,
it seems continuous to us.

but

Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to he brief,
confining themselves to less than 300
words ii possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of the Daily.

I1

ON THE
To the editor:

OTHER HAND

The appearance of two letters in
the Friday issue of The Daily seem
to call for comment.
To a student of drama, some of
the remarks made by 'A Summer
Session Student' can only be excus-
ed on the ground that the writer
is insufficiently informed on the
theater. In fact, what adverse crit-
icism The Daily has published this
summer can be attributed to this
same ignorance. To use a trite but
apt phrase 'it has been sophomor-
ic."
The directors of Play Production
this summer have been endeavor-
ing to meet two aims: first to in-
struct students in technique, and
secondly, to take the place of a
stock company here in town. The
plays, then, have been selected with
these two ideas in mind, and ex-
cellent work has been done with
them.
It is necessary to understand that
technique is a broad term, embody-
ing many types of acting.
It was admitted by the 'Summer
Session Student' that good work
was done in 'Escape' and in 'Chil-
dren of the Moon.' But just as good
work was done in 'Wedding Bells'
and in 'Kick In.' 'Wedding Bells'
was an excellent bit of direction. No
one connected with Play Production1
his ever claimed that 'Wedding1
Bells' is an English Classic. The
directors are not concerned with a
course in the appreciation of Lit-
erature. But they are teaching am-
ateur students how to act. Surely
it must be admitted that farce is
an important 'corner of this field.'
And 'Wedding Bells' is one of the
best examples of modern farce.
Again in 'Kick In' the directors
were not suffering from the de-
lusion that this play is a model for
the drama purists. But it is one
of the best of our modern melo-
dramas. And again, surely anyone
connected with the teaching of the
theater must admit that there is
great technical value to be gained
from melodrama.
In conclusion, let me say, that
. wonderful work has been done this
summer in mounting plays, consid-
ering the length of time that the
directorshave been able to put on
them due to the fact that it has
been necessary to produce a new
play every week. Play Production,
welcomes impartial and informed1
criticism, which it has not had this
summer.
Sincerely,

f About Books ,
A FRENCH MODERN
THREE PLAYS, by Henri Rene
Lenormand; Translated from the
French by D. L. Orna: Payson
and Clarke, Ltd., New York,
1929-$2.50.
"The Dream Doctor," "Man and
His Phantoms," and "The Cow-
ard," are the titles of the plays,
and themselves furnish sufficient
evidence that Lenormand is not
writing the conventional socia
drama of man at war with the
rigid ethical standards made
necessary by his own stupidity.
But these plays nevertheless
may properly be called social stu-
dies in the light of the psycholog-
ical background Lenormand brings
to his inquiry into character. The
work of Jung and Freud in ex-
ploring the reaches of sex in-
stincts throughout the life of the
individual have furnished the
foundation for his work; "The
Dream Doctor" is straightforward
working with such material. But
far from interpreting actions as
motivated directly from sex aber-
rations, Lenormand has enriched
his portraits with all the qualities
of individuality in such an accur-
ate and sympathetic manner
that they become individuals in
their own right and universally
recognized types. "The Coward"
exemplifies this manner.
The plot of "The Dream Doctor"
illustrates Lenormand's new treat-
ment of tragedy. The French title
is "Le Mangeur de Reves." Luke
de Bronte, psychoanalyst, is the
central figure. He says of him-
self: "I am like Bakou, the Jap-
anese demon, whose special func-
tion is to devour evil dreams." In
his relations with Jeannine Epe
it is discovered that all her life
she has been haunted by feelings
of guilt in connection with an in-
cident that involved herself and
her mother. To the audience is
discovered the fact that Jeannine
was instrumental in killing her
mother as the result of her child-
ish infatuation for her father. In
attempting to dispel this remorse
by learning the truth of the inci-
dent de Bronte and Jeannine re-
visit the scene. Jeannine is over-
come by the actual facts of the
occurrence which she had distort-
ed in her own mind to avoid self
condemnation and commits sui-
cide. But in each of the plays
the fundamental theme is the
same; that the natural instincts
of childhood have. found warped
fundamentally on the demands of
human personality; and the tragic
consequences are smashing in;
their inevitability.
Lenormand's treatment of this
theme and tragic theory is not at
all, as might be supposed, realis-
tic. It is rather, poetic, but saved
from the tenuous phantasy of
Maeterlinck by the force of the
dramatic treatment and by the
realism that invests what sym-
bolic characters are used. Much
of the poetic character is in the
dialogue, and here again Lenor-
mand may be called innovator,
for his writing even in the most
dramatic moments is not expos-
itory of emotions-unpacking the
soul in Shakopearian fashion-
but by suggestiveness in lines,
which comes finally to moments

of absolute silence, he carries the
play directly into the imagination
of his audienice, where it is recre-
ated with additional force.
Henri Rene Lenormand was
born in Paris, 1882. His father
was a musical composer. His ear-
liest production was "Les Possedes"
at the Theater des Arts in 1909, but
his greatest work has come after
the war. With Georges Pitoeff and
Gaston Baty, he has become the
direct successor of Jacques Copeau
and collaborates chiefly with Firmin
Gemier, director of the Odeon, who
gave the first production to "Man
and his Phantoms" in 1924. In pro-
duction theory this group has con-
tributed the impressionistic tech-
nique and the kaleidoscopic man-
ner of presenting action to theatri-
cal presentation, and together these
men compose one of the strongest
groups in the modern French thea-
trical movement.
The work of translating has been
splendidly done by D. L. Orna. Only
in very rare cases has the English
idiom escaped him-which is a very
minor failing in a work that is
beautifully condensed and sugges-
tive. S. M. B.
Erratum
Credit was omitted where credit
was due. Mr. George Wahr, pub-
lisher and bookseller, loaned the
review copy of Paul Hazard's "Sten-
dhal" which was discussed in this
space Sunday, and to him credit is

University o Michigan Plays
By
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN STUDENTS
With introduction by Prof. Louis A. Strauss and edited by Kenneth Thorpe
Rowe of the University of Michigan.
$1.60
R UNIVERSITY
WAH ''BOOKSTORE'

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ON ALL
SUIMMER FASHIONS

This is our tradional time of
and your tradional months
This is clearly shown by the
merchandise.

the year to clean house
to effect great savings.
prices we quote on our

COATS

For travel-utility, sports and
dress wear-in silks and wools
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DRESSES

For morning, afternoon and evening. Many
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$12O

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ENSEMBLES
in light and dark colors. In wool fabrics with silk dresses to match
their coat linings or skirts and blouses to match their coats.
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SPECIAL SUJTS...,1O
Many formerly $35.00

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Now that vacation
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