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July 30, 1929 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-30

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UESDAY, JULY 30, 1929

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

THE SUMMER MIC . ~a~ aGaN DaAILYa
-________________________________________ I I 4

- --

COMMUNITY INTERES
IN HEALTH NECESSARY
DECLARES__MISS JEN
FLAYS SCHOOLMEN WHO FAI
TO PROVIDE MEDICAL
CARE FOR CHILD
DOCTORS, NURSES NEEDEI
Dr. Snow Enumerates Qualification
Desirable for Supervisor of
Health Education
Speaking last Saturday mornin
at the first annual Health Con-
ference of the School of Education
Miss Sally Lucas Jean, former di-
rector, division of health education
American Child Hygiene associa-
tion, made the assertion that i
the superintendent of a public
school system has no interest ir
health programs or is not capabl
of carrying them on, it is impera-
tive to "get rid of him." Such a
superintendent has no place in th
schools, she said.
Summing up the reasons wh3
medical inspection is not carried
on efficiently, Miss Jean pointed tc
the fact that there are not enougl
doctors and nurses in our school
and that doctors are forced to make
superficial examinations owing tc
the large numbers which they must
examine. The remedy lies in arous-
ing the community. One means
suggested for doing this was tc
have one child properly examined
in the presence of its parents.
As many examinations in the
child's school life as can be made
thoroughly, should be made. One
thorough examination should be
the absolute minimum.
The public has not been kept
fully in touch with what health ed-
ucation is trying to do for the
school child. Thereis a great need
for publicity, which should be pro-
vided for by means of newspaper
articles, public meetings, etc.
The health education program is
weak in the means with which it
helps the teacher to meet her prob-
lems. The teacher cannot teach
personal health to the student
without having had experience in
that field of instruction. Thus the
problem centers upon the methods
of instructing the teacher. A plan
which has been tried in a normal
school in the Philippine Islands is
to give each student the supervis-
ion of a single child with a view
to directing its health education.
Referring further to her recent
stay in the Philippines, Miss Jean
said that the first health educa-
tion conference of leaders was held
in the Islands this summer.
"Our health education has gone
as far as it can until we push
back farther into the home," said
Miss Jean in conclusion. The next
step is to show parents the unde-
sirable conditions in the school and
to take them into the confidence
of the educator.
ASHEVILLE CITY- It appears
that "equal rights" for women has
not yet entirely won the approval
of the public. Because he permit-
ted his co-ed students as well as
the men to enjoy an after-class
"fag" in the corridors of the Ashe-
ville City college, the Asheville
board of education has refused a
new contract to Dean Henry Dex-

ter Learned. Professor David Wil-
son of Hampden City college, Vir-
ginia, will be the new dean.

l- .w

E.

PASTOR RULESANTHEM WARLIKE

y '

ADVERTISING
STRANSPACIFIC PLANE CDASFlD
WRECKED ON TAKEOFF TYPEWRITING AND MIMEO-
GRAPHING promptly and neatly

.

- -
u._

Above is pictured the Rev. George Hilton and the St. Paul's
Episcopal church, Huntington, Connecticut, of which he is rector.
The Reverend Hilton has objected upon several occasions to the
singing of "The. Star Spangled Banner" on holidays such as Me-
morial day, declaring the national anthem "is too warlike for-peace-
time America."

Lieut. Harold Bromley's Heavily
Loaded Craft Goes Into Loop
as Spray Blinds Pilot
SHIP WILL BE REBUILT
(By Associated Press)
TACOMA, Wash., July 30.-Lieut.
Harold Bromley's specially con-
structed monoplane was wrecked
here Sunday when he attempted
to take off on a non-stop flight to
Tokio, but he expects to try it
again within 60 days.
Heavily loaded, the low-swung
plane sped down a specially-built
ramp and whirled into a "ground
loop" after Bromley had been blind-
ed by spray from the craft's fully
loaded tanks.
Half the right wing of the plane
was crumpled. Bromley leaped
from the wreckage unhurt. The
flyer blamed; himself for the crash,
declaring he should have stopped
the ship as soon as the gasoline
spray blinded him.
. An examination showed that the
425-horsepower motor of the plane
had not been seriously damaged.
Achievement Award
May Be Presented
To Margaret Sanger
Margaret Sanger is being strong-
ly recommended by many promin-
ent physicians, sociologists, social
workers, and Brentano's, publishers
of her books, for the Pictorial Re-
view's $5,000 Annual Achievement
award, which is given each year to
the woman, American born or
naturalized, who within the preced-
ing 10 years has made the greatest
contribution to our national life in
letters, art, science, philanthropy,
or social welfare.
The recommendation is based on
her world leadership in the modern
birth control movement, her reor-
ganization and successful manage-
ment of the World Population con-
ference held in Geneva in 1927, her
creation of the Birth Control Clin-
ical Research bureau in New York
City, and her books dealing with
the vital subject of birth control
that have supplemented her many
years of service to womanhood.
Southerners Plan
Watermelon Feast
All students in the School of Ed-
ucation who hail from the South
are invited to a get-together picnic
on the Island at 6:45 o'clock' next
Saturday night. The bill of fare
will consist of watermelon and wa-
termelon.
Cars will leave from in front of
the Union at 6:45 o'clock. Every-
one having a car is requested to
drive it, and those persons without
cars will be furnished transporta-
tion.
All who wish to attend are re-
quested to register and deposit 25
cents in room 101, Tappan hall, to
cover the cost of the melons. This
deposit should be made before Fri-
day noon.

done by experienced operators at
moderate rates. College work a
specialty since 1908. E. D.
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade
THE RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY
SHOP OFFERS A
Marcel at 75c; Finger wave at $1.00;
Permanent wave at $8.50. Dial 7561.
MACK TUTORING AGENCY
Open for Summer School
310 S. State St. ' Phone 79271
TYPING-Theses a specialty. Fair
rates. M. V. Hartsuff, Dial 9387.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Forest near Hill; 14
rooms party furnished. 3 baths.
Double garage. Phone 5740.
FOR RENT-Large one-room com-
pletely furnished apartment for
two girls or young couple. Also
newly decorated double for girls.
422 E. Washington. Dial 8544 or
9714.
FOR RENT-- Unfurnished apart-
ments-upper and lower. Southeast
section. Modern. Call 5929.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Late Model T Ford
Sedan. Good tires. Excellent
condition. Price $75. See owner
540 Walnut. 28
LOST
LOST-Gold ring with brown tiger
eye cameo setting: Reward. Call
Mary Kaufman 8817. 31, 32, 33
Classified Ads
Bring Results

F .OR ITICKET RUSH
(Special To The Daily)
LAFAYETTE, Ind., July 30.-
Ticket machinery in the office of
C. S. Doan, manager of ticket sales
at Purdue University, is being given
a thorough overhauling. and oiling
these days as the office force pre-
pares for the big task of mailing
out 20,000 football ticket applica-
tion blanks between August 10 and
August 20, and the even bigger task
of handling the early deluge of mail
orders that is expected before Sep-
tember 1. With an attractive home
schedule that boasts tilts with the
Kansa\s Aggies and Michigan as
the first two encounters of the sea-
son, the early mail order ticket
sale is expected to be unusually
heavy as the tans clamor for seats
for the two tilts which will be
among the headliners of the early
season features in the middle west.
According to ticket manager
Doan, the first batch of ticket ap-
plications will be mailed from his
office on August 10, and by August'
20 ticket applications will have been
sent to all of the 20,000 people on
the various ticket lists. Mail orders
will be accepted any time after the
first ticket applications are mailed
out, and the actual filling of ticket
orders will start on September 1.
Attempts have been made this
year to simplify the ticket ordering
procedure for ticket applicants. In-
stead of a separate blank for each
game, such as has been used in the1
past, a new ticket application blank
has been devised by which tickets;
for any or all games of the season
may be ordered on one card.

TO HOLDCONVENTION
(By Associated Press)
MT. PLEASANT, July 30.-County
School Commissioners of Michigan
will gather at Central State Teach-
ers College August 5-8 for their an-
nual summer convention to thresh
out common problems that face
every county of the state.
Centralization in State School
control, county unit legislation and
the school tax burden are topics
on which discussion and addresses
will center. The usual problems of
consolidation, transportation, su-
pervision, and financing of schools'
will be brought before the conven-
tion.
Appearing as an expert on the
subject, Dr. J. M. Smith, Dean of
the Southwestern Louisiana Insti-
tute, will deliver addresses to com-
missioners on the results of County
Unit Control in his state.. Other
speakers on the first-day Droaram,
Monday, August 5, include Presi-
dent E. C. Warriner, of Central
State Teachers College; Webster H.
Pearce, State Superintendent of
Public Instruction, and Fred R.
Ming, speaker of the Michigan
House of Representatives.
Timon Covert, of the Federal
Bureau of Education in Washing-
ton, will read on the second day a
report of a survey made by ten
Michigan commissioners on the re-
ported need of county unit legisla-
tion in this state. 'Dean Smith will
continue his discussion of the Loui-
siana system. The afternoon will
be given over to discussion of child
welfare with the following taking
part.

OCCCCO'CCClllll.,/ l.,/ 'ul.T./

tiLv
Saun
ti On the Hi

. w w -

\NOELNG
ery Afternoon and Evening

ders' CanoeLivery
uron River at the foot of Cedar St.

1

TYPEWRITERS
RIBBONS
SUPPLIES
for all makes of
Typewriters.

t

Rapid turnover, fresh stock, insures
best quality at a moderate price.
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615

Dress

Ii

The Biggest,
Richest Soda
in Ann Arbor
Calkins - Fletc

Forty-Seven Years
of Faithful Service

I
her
Packard Sts.

During the past forty-seven years this Bank
has retained its Individual identity, embracing the
most modern methods acid meeting changing condi-
tions with an ever increasing background of experi-
ence in serving progressive business.
It is a stable financial structure in this com-
munity to which you may look with the utmost
assurance when seeking a strong Bank to transact
your business.

Clearance...*
This is the sale you have been waiting for.
Right now in the Summer season with
weeks and weeks of warm weather still to
come. You will be delighted with the sav-
ings to be found in our ready-to-wear sec-
tions - and if you glance at the former
prices you will readily see just what marked
savings -can be effected by making your pur-
chases during this sale. The variety is ample
to allow you to make an easy selection. Many
of these garments can be worn until late in
Fall.
00A04404

DRUG COMPAN
State State andF
East and S, University

FARMERS & MECHANICS BANK
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Member Federal Reserve System

324 S.

11ov

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