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November 09, 1934 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-11-09

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FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Publir".ed every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
And the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
Associated tollEsiatt 1Ce5s
W4EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann" Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
. Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR .............WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CITY EDITOR......... ..............JOHN HEALEY
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ............RALPH G. COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR ...................ARTHUR CARSTENS
WOMEN'S EDITOR .....................ELEANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Paul J. Elliott, John J. Flaherty, Thomas
E. Groehn, Thomas H. Kleene, David 0. Macdonald,
John M. O'Connell, Robert S. Ruwitch, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Western, Joel Newman,
Kenneth Parker, William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Eleanor Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Jo-
sephine McLean, Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick,
Jane Schneider, Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: John H. Batdorff, Robert B. Brown, Richard
Clark, Clinton B. Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H.
Fleming, Robert J. Freehling, Sherwin Gaines, Richard
fF Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Jack Mitchell, Fred W. Neal,
Melvin C. Oathout, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Mar-
shall Shulman, Donald Smith, Bernard Weissman, Jacob
C. Seidel, Bernard Levick, George Andros, Fred Buesser,
z obert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman,
Raymond Goodman, Morton Mann.
Dorothy Briscoe, Maryanna Chockly, Florence Davies,
Helen Diefendorf, Marian Donaldson, Elaine Goldberg,
Betty Goldstein, Olive Griffith, Harriet Hathaway, Ma-
rion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levin, Elizabeth Miller,
Melba Morrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Reuger. Dorothy
Shappell, Molly Solomon, Dorothy Vale; Laura Wino-
grad, Jewel Wuerfel.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER................ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER ........JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, John Og-
den; Service Department, Bernard Rosenthal; Contracts.
*Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkworth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohlgemuith, Lyman Bittman, Richard
Hlardenbrook, John Park, F. Allen Upson, Willis Tom-
linson, Homer Lathrop, Tom Clarke, Gordon Cohn,
Merrell Jordan, Stanley Jo fe.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Mary Bursley, Margaret Cowie,
Marjorie Turner, Betty Cavender, Betty Greve, Helen
Shapland, Betty Simonds, Grace Snyder, Margaretta
Kohlig, Ruth Clarke, Edith Hamilton, Ruth Dicke,
Paula Joerger, Mary Lou Hooker, Jane Heath, Bernar-
dine Field, Betty Bowman, July Trosper.

Schools For
Scandal .. .
UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI stu-
dents, electing officers recently, cast
200 more votes than there were students. Political
science teachers began to wonder if they were
teaching too well.
At Ohio State University, where the student
paper and a handful of idealistic students lost a
fight to do away with class elections entirely,
voting for Homecoming Queen a few days later
was dirtier than usual. "How many times did you
vote?" asks a line at the top of the next morn-
ing's front page.
Names and fee cards of students who voted
illegally are being held for possible investigation
by the Student Senate. Members of both local
combines were implicated, the paper charged.
More specifically, the evils charged were double,
triple, and quadruple voting; electioneering within,
10 feet of the poles; rampant fee card distribu-
tion, voting with fee cards whose owners were not
near the polls all day. In addition, according to
the Lantern, "parades and the usual ballyhoo
marked the election."
Chief note of optimism was that "campus
opinion apparently approves of the method of se-
lecting queen candidates, which has eliminated
much of the ill-feeling that has existed in former
years." Three masked judges had reduced the
field from 40 to six.
Why not let a couple of blindfolded judged do
the rest of the picking, and eliminate ill-feeling
altogether?

CO LLEGIAT E
O BSERVER
By BUD BERNARD
When a professor of English at the Uni-
vercity of Iowa was unable to indulge in his
pet habit, recently, reading to his class, there
was need for an explanation. He hurriedly
pointed out that his glasses fell and shattered
while he was talking to a young lady. This
brought some cheers and laughter from the
class.
"No! No!" the professor exclaimed. "Don't
get me wrong. She was only a faculty member."
* *

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Campus Opinion

Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing theseditorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked to
be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words.
Question And Answer Department
To the Editor
Although the University of Michigan football
team is suffering a disappointing year, I see no
reason why its supporters should make any criti-
cism of them as a ball club. However I would like
to inquire of you just why is it that yours and my
school team is equipped with such unprepossessing
uniforms. I understand perfectly that apparel
doesn't furnish fight and spirit, that the U. of M.
provides the best protection for its plays, but why,
in these days of color and dhow, can't Michigan
keep up with the procegsion and add color to its
representatives on the gridiron. You must admit
that, when lined up with the opposition, Michigan
presents a pretty drab appearance.
-A Fellow Student.
NOTE: The sports' staff informs us that
this question has come up to the coaches before
and that they have decided that it is better to
keep our present colors, for the sake of the
tradition, than to change for something louder
and funnier. Personally, we rather like the
solid substantiality of the Michigan uniforms
when comparedewith the latest spectrum com-
bination of the opposing teams. - The Editors.
Bouquet
To the Editor:
I think it is no more than proper that you
should be told what I hear on every side, of the
great improvement which has occurred this year
in the editorial management of The Daily. This
goes particularly for the editorial page,, but the
approval extends, I think, to most other depart-
ments. In level-headedness and maturity of ap-
proach I consider it by far the best Daily we have
had since I have been in Ann Arbor.
-Prof. John E. Tracy.

Huey P. Long's gridiron gymnastics at Van-
derbilt University last week has brought him into
demand as a football crowd-getter. George Wash-
ington University, which meets Huey's proteges.
Louisiana State University's Tigers on Nov. 10,
wants the Kingfish to beat the tom-toms for their
ball game. An Associated Press dispatch states,
'.'Both unbeaten, George Washington and Louisiana
are sure to draw a good 'house.' But with the
Kingfish as an added attraction, George Washing-
ton envisions a sell-out and perhaps an all-time
high for capital contests. What with Georgia re-
portedly offering Louisiana a game next fall 'if
they bring Huey along' and George Washington
clamoring for his presence, Long has made quick
strides as an apprentice in his new collegiate
field."
Here's a contribution coming from a pre-
med. Incidentally, he admits he can't write
poetry, but these, he says, are his true con-
victions.
SCIENTIFIC POETRY
3 hours lab
On Sattidy morn
Makes me wish
I'd nevah been born.
The damsels at the New Jersey College for
Women are warned by the student publication
to learn football game etiquette. Here are some of
the fine points of football that should be known:
1. When your friend's alma mater fails to-scote,
cheer him up by saying, "Old washout seems to be
off the gold standard."
2. Never cheer the wrong team. If you are in
doubt root for both.
3. Don't be frightened by queer things on the
field. They are not maniacs, but cheerleaders.
4. When you arrive complain about your seats. It
will show your escort that you love the finer things
in life.
THE SAGES SAY
Some teachers compare the college curricula to a
Swedish smorgas table at which the hungry stu-
dent is invited to wander blindfolded and sample
a hundred viands until his appetite is sated and
he rolls under the table to sleep off his indiges-
tion. - Henry Goddard Leach.
Add this to your list of similies: As healthy as
a centipede with athletes feet.
-University of Maryland Daily.
"Dear Bud," writes C.L.M. "what we want to
know is whether all cases of nervousness can
be cured, or did the cigarette manufacturers
just give it up?
Illinois draft teams did better in the University
of Illinois' annual horse-pulling contest this year
than at any time in the last eight years. Dobbin
is no softie.
Istanbul, the chief city of Turkey, has tried and
rejected traffic lights.

I

K ' Union
-aniiinces that there will
be a regular membership
(lance this week-end, Fri-
lay 9 till 1 and Saturday
.9 till 12.
MVichigan Union0-1 Ballroom

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NIGHT EDITOR: ROBERT S. RUWITCH
M,

Make Appontments
FOR

As For Michigan
Democracy .. .

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Your

T UESDAY MORNING, The Daily,
taking a long breath and jumping
off the deep end, prophesied that the Democrats
would get at least a two-thirds majority in
the House of Representatives. They did. We pro-
phesied also that they would gain from three to
six seats in the Senate. They appear to have
gained ten. The Democratic landslide is complete,
devastating, and, except for Michigan, unchal-
lenged.
What happened in Michigan?
In the first place, the Democratic administra-
tion of Governor Comstock never made a fa-
vorable impression upon the electorate. This may
have been the fault of the quarreling Democrats
themselves or it may simply have been their mis-
fortune to have been placed in the right office
at the wrong time. Anyway, the Democrats lived
up neither to the hopes of the people nor to their
own promises, and the electorate could hardly
feel any great sympathy for their troubles.
Second, the Republicans were wise enough not
to attack President Roosevelt personally or the New
Deal generally. Fitzgerald never allowed himself
to think that the Federal administration could have
any connection with the State administration.
Vandenberg embraced those elements of the New
Deal he felt would be popular and singled out for
attack those that were weak. It was not difficult
to kick out an unsatisfactory governor and retain
an experienced senator when the Republican can-
didates were so nice.
Third, there is little effective leadership in. the
Democratic party in this State. Mr. Jefferson's
party has fed so scarcely among the rocks and
reeds for so long that all the bright young men
interested in promoting themselves politically
hitch up with the other gang. This means that the
Democratic party is composed primarily of small
town dentists and unemployed mechanics of De-
troit. A brain in Michigan Democracy is as rare
as a snow flurry in Pango-Pango.
The Democrats missed a splendid opportunity.
Gaining the governorship for the first time in
decades two years ago, with any sort of intelligent
cohesion they could have retained that office this
year and added a senator to their trophy case.
But they acted like boobs and the people have now
given them a booby prize. The damage to their own
party is deserved, and not particularly unusual,
but the damage to Michigan if the State is again
to return to one-party government is unfortunate.

P olitical And EconomicLibet
O 11C& R ~ nOT1C 1ert
By DR. STEPHEN DUGGAN
Director of the Institute of International Education,
in the October number of the Institute's News Bulletin

Senior Picture
N OW!

I RETURNED HOME ABOUT SEPT. 1 after an
absence of more than eight months during
which I went across Europe from London to Mos-
cow, visiting the representatives of the Institute,
interviewing leaders of all kinds in the different
countries and trying particularly to discover the
effects of dictatorships upon the spiritual life of
the peoples living under them. Perhaps I may be
forgiven for thinking that that experience justifies
me in making the statement which follows:
I return to find our own people greatly, if not,
indeed, primarily interested in the problem of
economic security. No one familiar with the despair
which has fallen upon millions of our citizens,
many of them of high intellectual status, result-
ing from economic insecurity caused by the de-
pression, can but share in that interest. Cer-
tainly my own sympathy is unreservedly given to
the development of economic security in as
rapid a degree as possible.
Where do economic security and economic free-
dom exist? In dictatorship countries? Certainly not.
In every dictatorship the individual is subject to
absolute control by the state. Wherever political
liberty has been destroyed, there economic free-
dom is dead. The status of the working people in
practically every European country was gradually
raised as a result of their being organized into
trade unions which could defend their interests.
In every country where there has been a Fascist
revolution the' trade unions have been destroyed
and despite the promises of dictatorships, whether
individual or group, to safeguard the interests of
the workers, those interests have been sacrificed
whenever the dictatorship has considered it neces-
sary and there remained no organization to defend

Year Plan were in .most cases voluntarily accepted
by the proletarian workers in face of the supposed
threat to Soviet Russia by the capitalistic countries.
Nevertheless, anyone familiar with the situation
knows that in the last analysis the trade unions
do what they are ordered to do by the Soviet
government.
This Bulletin does not circulate among workers
and industrialists, but among the intellectual
classes. But no mistake should be made by the in-
tellectual classes as to their economic status under
dictatorships. Through government control over all
jobs no teacher can hold his place a moment
unless he teaches the right doctrine. His economic
security and economic freedom die at once.
Through the control over the economic position
of the teacher there is established practically
complete restraint over his intellectual freedom.
The government regulates his intellectual free-
dom by its control over the printing press and by
its refusing to allow him to publish writings
not in harmony with its theories. Finally, the gov-
ernment . has the prison and the concentration
camp at its disposal so that it is fair to say that
the door of intellectual freedom is triple locked in
dictatorship countries.
I have taken the fate of the teacher as typical
of what happens to the intellectual in general.
The tomb-like stillness that has settled upon
such splendid former organs of public opinion as
the Corriera della Sera of Milan, the Neue Freie
Presse of Vienna or the Frankfurter Zeitung when
confronted with momentous public problems that
demand solutions that may be opposed to those
of the dictatorship is eloquent of what has hap-
pened to the journalist and the publicist.

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RENTSCHLER STUDIO
SPEDDING STUDIO

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The 1935

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