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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 05, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

CHIGAN DAILY

'11t-n att Daa

. , __
..

4r~ A t

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univ
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use f
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwi
credited in this paper and tie local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as seco
Bless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business. 960; Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the s
nature not necessarily to appear in printbut as an evidence1
faith, and notices of events will be publishied in The Daily at #l
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily offi
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No ma
uscript will be returned unless the writer incluses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments e
pressed in the communications.
"What's going On" notices wiU not be received after S o'clo
on the evening preceding insertion.

er-
for
rise
)ad
ig.
"Of
he
:e.
n-
Ck

they should bawl out, these opinions inconsiderately
into the ears of disgusted neighbors who are vainly
attempting to hear the words of their instructor.
Some one should call the wagon and remove these
master minds to the booby-hatch.

G

A

H

A

M

H A M

TEXTBOOKS

and SUPPLIES for All

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR.............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor .............................Chesser U. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
J. I. Dakin J E. McManis
Renaud Sherwood T.W. Sarent, Jr.
Sunday E ditor............................... . P. Ca mbstein
Editorals............Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. Jw'hiWery
orta+................ Robert Angell
'Women's Editor............... .........Mary D. Lane
Telegraph............... . ........ ..... ... Thomas Dewey
Telescope...............--........--.........Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Wald* Wallace F. Elliott E.. R. Mesa
Paul G. Weber Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
Elizabeth Vickery Hughston McBain Beata Hasley
G. E. Clark Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
George Reindel A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
Dorothy Monfort W.W.Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
harry B. Grundy Paul Watzel William H./Riley Jr.
'ianc Oberhotaer J W. Hum;e Jr. Sara Waller
Robert E. Adams Byron Darton H. E. Howlett
George L. Stone M. A. Klavez

SUPPORTING DR. CLARA SARGENT
For the second time the University Y. W. C. A.
is launching its seventeen hundred dollar drive for
the support of Dr. Clara Sargent, '15M, in her
health wQrk among the Chinese. The need for such
work is recognized by all who know conditions in
China, and Dr. Sargent as an agent in carrying it
out has received the hearty endorsement of those
who knew her as a student and later in her profes-
sion. The drive carries a double appeal to Michi-
gan women.
The support of a Michigan graduate in this proj-
ect means that our University is bearing its share
in spreading the knowledge of laws of health and
sanity. Other universities, notably Chicago, Wis-
consin and Minnesota, are supporting similar under-
takings. Michigan surely will not lag behind.
The need of the service that Dr. Sargent is per-
forming carries a still 'stronger appeal than that of
University pride. People could hardly need train-
ing in health and hygiene more than the Chinese.
It'is not only necessary for the present generation
but essential to the future well-being of the na-
tion. China is looking to us for help and by loyal
support of the drive we can prove our sympathy
and friendship.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. mn., 7:05 a. in.,
8:10 a.., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex.
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit-5: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:60 a. m., and}
12:10 p.m.

Ready to Serve
AT ANY TIME
Open from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Pot of hot e and bowl of Ace
PLAIN CHOP SUEY
85 CENTS
CHINESE and AMERICAN Style
Short Orders
Qun nTung Lo
615 Ltbertya t W.

JPAI

Colleges at Both Stores
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

DIN G -
Athletic
Equipment
For Every
Indoor
And
Outdoor
Sport
Catalog" onequest

A. G
211 s.

SPALDING & BROS,
State St., Chicalo, Ill.

P
C
C
I
F
E
G

__ a

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 90
BUSINESS MANAGER...........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR
Advertising.................................. . P. Joyce
:lassifieds.......................................Robt. . Kerr
Publication....................... ....... ..:.I7. M. Heatbh
Accounts............... ........... . U.Priehe
Circulation........ ..........................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecbt P. R Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Crass R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millad s X Moule D. G. Slawson
J. J. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
ue of The Daily should seethe night editor, who has full charg;
all news to be printed that ,night.

SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1921.
Night Editor-JOHN . DAKIN.

7'
Ct

WE'RE NO "POTTERISTS"
The University of California has entered the lists
op the reformist side against the startling lack of
convention in dress, they alleged, women are dem-
onstrating today. They have instituted a new and
doubtless most novel scheme. A committee has been
appointed, whose business it is to patrol the cam-
pus, on the look-out for rouge, short-skirts, and any
otheir signs of what its members feel to be brazen
conduct upon the part of the co-eds of the univer-I
sity. And what happens to this luckless offender of:
California's censorship? Ah, just listen. The bold
committeeman, wearing the frown which is the ,cen-
sor's badge of office, gum-shoes up in a quiet way
and taps her on the shoulder. No demonstration,
no noise; everything is carried out in the most quiet
manner possible; but she has been warned. 'She
must mend her ways, or there will be trouble. Just.
what sort of punishment is to be fall the fair co-ed
who enjoys attiring herself in Vogue models if she
fail to obey the warning of these student censors,
has not been disclosed. From the grossness of the
offense against a Puritanical sense of decency, she
will doubtless be given a short term in the univer-
sity house of correction, or perhaps summarily ex-
pelled from her college.
Michigan must be behind the times. In fact, we
feel that Michigan must certainly and quite un-
consciously be very loose as far as morals go. For
we have heard no objections so far to short skirts.
Some of us hold out against rouge - too much of
it, of course - but we have failed to reach the tap-
ping stage as yet. Michigan men have felt, as a
rule, that it is the co-ed's business just how she de-
sires to attire herself, and it is highly to their credit.
Rose Macaulay has lately written a book called,
"Potterism" and such bosh and blue-law senseless-
ness as that of the tapping of girls, simply because
they reserve their right to dress as the styles. dic-
tate, is about as surely "potterism" as any of the
many things which come under the vindictiveness
of the author of the book. Michigan has never been
"potteristic." Let us trust that it never will be-
come so.

t

i

"Be a Citizen and Vote for George E. Lewis,"
hollered the election placards. We can well picture
the hesitation of opposition voters as they slunk in-
to the-polls and furtively dropped the fatal ballot
that established their alien status.
If you have the habit it may be hard to give it up,
but in view of the number of deaths recently caused
in Michigan cities by botulinus poisoning, you eat
canned spinach at your peril.
An account of 151 students getting "passports"
concludes "the June lists are always larger". Not a
cheerful prospect but a fair warning.
When a householder wants to prove that he is a
new resident in Ann Arbor all he has to do is to
clean his sidewalk.
A college Woman has called Americans "lip-
lazy". Heaven help us if her own sex take the
charge seriously.
The Telescope

S

MARCH
S M T W
1 2
6 7 8 9:
13 14 15 161
20 21 22 232
27 28 29 30t

T
3
10
17
24
31

I

e <: .. .

F
4
11
18
25

S
12
19
26

I

NOW
"The

OP t e

OPEN

Ain't It the Truth?
We look before and after
And pine for what is not.
'he cards we throw away one hand
Would help the next a lot.

Gone where the woodbine twineth and the cuckoo
calleth are the old fashioned humorists who got
away big with this one:
First actor-I went to see Hamlet last night.
Second-And after seeing it, do you really think
that Hamlet was mad?
First--He must have been. There wasn't over
$50 in the house.

Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refnished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
IOTHERS S AY:
(From the Daily Illii.)
Although the spirit displayed around
the Conference this winter has been
the best in many years, there is one
outstanding exception, the University
of Michigan.
The treatment accorded the Illini
basketball team in Ann Arbor last Sat-
urday night was disgraceful, especial-
ly as it came from tn institution which
has always pretended to stand for
all that is noble and good in college
athletics.
To begin with, the Michigan fans
opened up a rapid fir of abusive
shouting as soon as the squad appear-
ed on the court. This was directed
particularly at Carney and Walquist
both of whom played a mighty part
in the 7 to 6 football victory last fall.
Walquist, it will be remembered,
was the Illini footballer who stopped
Perrin in an open field and prevented
a Michigan touchdown. The Wolver-
ines unjustly contend that the cap
tain elect purposely tripped Perrin.
Unbiased witnesses who viewed the
game deny this accusation.
Not content with "ragging" the I-
lini players, the Wolverines resorted
to "roughing." The referee, Nichols
of Ohio State, called fouls frequently
but even this did not stop the "dirty
playing." Carney was hit in the face
with a deliberately thrown ball by one
of the Michigan players.
During intermission, Carney, Hell-
strom and Tabor remained on the
court to practice basket tossing. The
fans tried to hiss them off the floor.
The crowd even shouted while Captain
Vail was attempting to sink free
throws.
The climax came, however, when
some fan shouted, after Willaims had
missed an easy shot, "take him out."
The stands were only mildly enthusi-
astic about the Michigan team and
did not hesitate to show open disap-
proval.
When the Wolverines appear here
Monday night, the Illini fans should
treat them with great respect. The'
old score must be forgotten.
Illinois is too far above this sort of
pettiness to remember the treatment
at Ann Arbor.
Lightweight imported golf hose.
$3.00 upward. Wild & Co., State St.-
Adv.
Use the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.
FOUNTAIN PENS
REPAIRED

LUISA TETRAZZINI
Celebrated Opera and Concert Star
ROSA PONSELLE
Metropolitan Opera Company
FLORENCE HINKLE
American Oratorio Singer
CYRENA VAN GORDEN
Chicago Opera Association
MERLE ALCOCK
A Premiere Concert Artist
TITO SCHIPA
Chicago Opera Association
CHARLES MARSHALL
(CARLO MARZIALE) '
Chicago Opera Association
LAMBERT MURPHY
A Brillant Artist
THEODORE HARRISON
An American Favorite
ARTHUR MIDDLETON
Metropolitan Opera Company

I

ARTISTS

CONTRALTOS

THE ORIGINAL HOME OF
H ME COOKES MEALS
STATES atILL St
Ann Arbor May Festival
May 18, 19, 20, 21,1921

TENORS

0

Dear Noah:
It seems to me that most of the men here in col-
lege have no definite aim in life, that they are sim-
ply drifting with the tide. Where could I meet some
men who have really done something?
Ambitious Co-ed.
You might try the penitentiary at Jackson. Most
of the men there have really done something.

aRITONES

I

CHASE B. SIKES
A Splendid Young Artist
GUSTAF HOLMQUIST
A Real Bass
FANNIE BLOOMFIELD-ZEISLER
America's Greatest Woman Pianist
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION Albert A. Stanley,
Three Hundred Singers
A CHORUS OF CHILDREN George Oscar Bowen,
Several Hundred School Children
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Frederick Stock,
Seventy Players

If some of these co-called
Prominent men on the campus
Were to die suddenly I wonder
If Satan would greet them
With the remark, "You might
Have been a big gun on the
Michigan campus, but you
won'tdcut any ice down here."
I wonder.

BASS

PIANIST
Conductor
Conductor
Conductor

QLL THE WAGON
A university career exposes the individual to edu-
cation. He may imbibe as much or little as he cares
to; the cup stands brimming, tempting to some, to
others unattractive. The vast majority of us desire
to drink comfortably deep. We go to recitation or
to lectures in order that we may hear the views of
men who have studied and who know, and often we
take notes.
But evidently there are a few who attend classes
merely from convention. They do not want to lis-
ten, they have convinced themselves of the medioc-.
rity of the course without allowing it the right of
trial. These few take a peculiar delight in remark-
ing disparagingly concerning instructors, professors,
authorities, anyone, with consistent indiscrimination,
dogmatically pointing out the stupidity of men
whose knowledge exceeeds their limited capacities
one thousand fold. It is distressing enough that
certain individuals in our midst should be so ignor-
ant as to believe even secretly that they can reap no
benefit from contact with faculty members of the
Vniversity of Michigan, but it is unendurable that

I

I

Many of the landladies can never be accused of
not sweeping under the beds - most of them sweep
everything there.

Annette Kellerman
IN

WHAT WOMEN LOVE
Daily movie ad.
About 9o per cent of them around here, we'd say
off hand.

SCHEDULE OF PRICES FOR TICKETS
(All Tickets are Exempt front War Tax)
Orders for course Festival tickets (with remittance) should be
sent in BY MAIL at the earliest possible'date. They will be fl ed and
filled in ,the, order of receipt, and tickets; will be muailed out. about
April first.
BLOCK "A"-Three central sections (2-3-4) on the Main Floor
and the first Eight Rows in the First Balcony... .7.00
BLOCK "B"-Two side sections (1 and 5) on the Main Floor and
the last Seven Rows in the First Balcony.....$6.00
BLOCK "C"-First Fourteen Rows in the Second. Ii~lcony..$5..00
BLOCK "D'-Last Nine Rows in the Second Balcony...........$4,50
Holders of Pre-Festival Course Tickets should deduct $3.00 from
the above mentioned prices provided they return the "cover-coupon"
attached thereto, the schedule then being; BLOCK "A"-$4.00; BLOCK
B"- $3.00; BLOCK "C'"-$2.00; BLOCK "D"-$21.50.
Please address all orders and . make remittances payable to
CHARLES A. SINK, SJJCRETARY, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN.
PUBLIC SALE OF COURSE TICKETS -- On Saturday morning,
March 19, at eight o'clock, all course tickets not ordered by mail will
be placed on public sale at the UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC,
Maynard Street, at the rates mentioned above.
TICKETS FOR INDIVIDUAL CONCERTS-On Saturday morning,
May 7, at eight o'clock, all unsold course tickets will be broken up and
placed on sale at $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00 each for individual concerts.

Probably All Broken Up About It
"Shut the door," she whispered, drawing herself
apart in the corner. - From "The Affair at the
Semiramis Hotel."

He ran from the floor with a bound,
Overwhelmed with a great disgust.
And some one loaned him an overcoat
For his gymnasium suit-was bust.
Famous Closing Linei

New Points to Suit
Any Hand
Haller & Fuller
State St. Jewelers

I

"Shop lifting," he cried as he saw the cyclone
pick up the store.

NOTICE
The right is reserved to make such changes in the programs, or
in the personnel of the artists announced as necessity may demand.
All tickets are purchased with the distinct understanding that under
no condition will they be taken back at the office, nor does the offce
assume any responsibility,whatsoever, for tickets lost, stolen, mislaid,
or destroyed in any manner.

I

NOAH COUNT.

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