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March 05, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-05

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THE WEATHER
LOCAL SNOWS; WARNER
~ TODAY,

rsk Abp
ma

:4' ai1 t

ASSOCIATED
PRESS

DAY AND NIGHT VV RE
SHEi ICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 104. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

PANAMA INVADED
BY COSTA RICANS1
USTROOPS READY

NORTH AMERICAN INTERESTS
ENDANGERED TERRITORY
THREATENED

IN

SEIZED TOWN OBJECT
OF ANCIENT DISPUTE
Navy Department Expected to Order
Warships to Mouth of Bound-
ary River
(By Associated Press)
BULLETIN
San Juan del Sur Nicaragua,
March 4.-Guabito, lying a short
distance to the northwest of Bocas
del Toro, in Panama, was captur-
ed by Costa Rican . forces at 5
o'clock this morning. The Pan-
amalans retired towards Bocas del
Toro, leaving behind 18 dead and
many wounded.
Guabito, which is near the At-
lantic coast side of the isthmus
of Panama, was taken by the Costa
Ricans after several hours of
fighting.
Panama, March 4. - Confirmation
was received here this morning that
Costa Rican forces are advancing upon
Almirante in the province of Bocas del
Toro, where extensive North Amer-
ican interests are located. The advic-
es report casualties but do not say
whether Almirente had been captured,
although little hope is entertained that
the Panamaians could withstand the
superior forces of, the Costa Ricans.
Almirante is included in the terri-
tory-which Panama has been holding
under the status quo while the front-
ier line has remained undecided. Al-
mirante, like Coto on the Pacific coast,
has been claimed by the Costa Ricans,
who have disputed Panamaan posses-
Take Three Ships
With the capture of three Costa
Rican vessels at Coto, the Panamaians
have nearly 200 prisoners.
Unconfirmed reports which reached
here this morning stated that the Un-
ite States naval' forces were ready
to proceed to Coto and Almirante at
the Balboa headquarters and are of
the 15th naval district. It was stated.
however, that orders to make such a
movement, had not been received.
The expectation prevails, however.
that the United States naval forces
soon would move into the invaded ter-
ritory, probably for the purpose of
protecting North American interests
in the zone of hostilities.
Navy Ready
Washington, March 4.-A number of
vessels of the special service squadron
now in Panama waters probably will
be ordered to the mouth of Sisola
river,. where Costa Rican troops have
crossed into the disputed territory of
Panama, it was said here tonight. At
the navy department it was stated
that no such order had yet been is-
sued, although eight department of-
ficials said they have requested that
several vessels be sent there but under
definite orders to effect no landing.
The Costa ,Riean, minister was in-
disposed tonight and would make no
statement.
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD FOR
JUDGE CLAUDIlUS B. GRANT, '59
The body of Judge Claudius B.
Grant, '59, who died Monday in Flor-
ida, was buried in Forest Hill ceme-
tery yesterday afternoon.
Funeral services were held in St.
Andrew's church at 2 o'clock yester-
day afternoon, the service of the Epis-
copal'church being read by the Rev.
W. D. Maxon of Detroit, and the Rev.
Dr. Henry Tatlock, rector of St. An-
drew's.

WOMEN'S ATHLETIC
BANQUET TONIGHT
Plans for the annual gathering to
be given by the Women's Athletic as-
sociation tonight in Barbour gymna-
sium are complete. The affair will
follow the usual custom beginning at
5:30 o'clock with a banquet in the
dining room.
Unique sings are ready for the oc-
casion and will precede the usual
toasts. Phyllis Wiley, '21, president
.of the association, will act as toast-
mistress, introducing Dean Myra B.
Jordan, Miss Marian L. Wood, and
Clarissa Vyn, '18, a former president
of the association.. Miss Wood will
present the honor awards and an-
nounce the members of the class bas-
ketball teams.
The cotillion will begin at 7:30
o'clock. An evening of dancing, in-
cluding specialties, will follow.
LESION SEEKS 5O0 MEN
FOR UNIVERSITY 'POST
"Campaigning for at least 500 new
members for the University post of
the American Legion, the officials in
charge of the present drive will bring
their- efforts to a close next Wednes-
day when the personal canvass meth-
od will be abandoned and tables will
be placed at convenient points about
the campus at which men may sign
up for membership.
As evidence that the American Le-
gion is a man's organization and pos-
sesses the conviction that athletics
form at least a part of real living, the
story is told of a fighting chaplain
,wv+ho quoted the scriptures to the mem-
bers of the Missouri legislature in be-
half of a boxing bill which the legion
is pushing in that state.
The quotation, which was made by
the Rev. Earl A. Blackman, is from
the ninth chapter of Corinthians, "I
am a boxer and I hit hard and
straight, not as one who beats the
air, but I buffet my body."
FRIDAY 'MAY BE NEW
MAAIC EAD IS REPORT
In view of the fact that Frank S.
Kedzie, president of Michigan. Agri-
cultural college, has informed mem-
bers of the state board of agriculture
of his impending resignation, accord-
ing to a news story in Friday's De-
troit News, members of the board are
considering offering the position to
Prof. David Friday, of the economics
department.
C Consideration of Professor Friday's
name for the presidency of the Lan-
sing school came after petitions had
been received by the board from va-
rious persons interested in seeing him
at the head of the college.
Hockey Team To
Play Rayls Today
With a stronger team than when
last they competed, the Michigan in-
formal hockey team will meet the
Rayls of Detroit again at 4:45 o'clock
this afternoon at ,the Coliseum.
It is expected that the Wolverines
will annex the long end of the score
as at the last meeting the Detroiters
left with a 4 to 2 count against them.
The Michigan squad is, moreover, con-
siderably stronger now than it was

at the same time last year.
This'is probably the last time it will
be possible to see the Michigan team
in action this year.
Comedy Club Tickets Go on Sale
Tickets for "Bunty Pulls the
Strings," the Comedy club production
which will be given 'Wednesdayeven-
ing, March 9, at the Whitney theater,
have been placed .on sale at Graham's
bookstore on State street..

DETROIT CHOIR TO
SING HERE SUNDAY
Temple Beth-El Choristers Secured
for Musical Portion of
Union" Services
RABBI FRANKLIN TO DELIVER
RITUAL; A. J. COHN IN CHARGE
The musical portion of the next
Union services, to be held at 7
o'clock Sunday evening in Hill audi-
torium, is to be furnished by the
choir of Temple Beth El, of Detroit,
said to be one of the best trained
choirs in that city.
The choir is really a mixed quar-
tet, two men and two women. The
director, Mr. William Howland, is
prominent in Detroit musical circles.
Mr. Howland also sings bass. The
other members are Miss Vernelle Roh-
rer, alto, Mr. George Becker, tenor,
and Mrs. Charles Welker, soprano. An
organist, Mr. Abram Ray Tyler, also
accompanies the choir.
Rabbi Franklin to Read Ritual
The choir's first number will be a
ritual response, divided into four
parts, Borchu and Sh'ma Yisroel, by
Rogers, and Mi Chomocho and Ke-
dusha, by Shlesinger. Two anthems,
Marston's "Out of the Depths" and
Woodman's "And in the Day.'
The ritual will be read by Rabbi
Leo M. Franklin of Detroit, and Abe
J. Cohn, '21L, will preside. The Rev.
Sidney S. Robins will read the prayer
and the scripture.
The speaker of the evening, the
Hon. Julius Kahn, representative of
the fourth California district, is at
present chairman of the house com-
mittee on military affairs, and was
mentioned for the portfolio of the
war department in Harding's cabinet.
Prominent in House
He has served in the house for 10
terms, and during this time has cham-
pioned the bill which gave the Pana-
ma-Pacific exposition to San Fran-
cisco and the Selective Draft bill. He
has also been instrumental in the
passage of numerous bills dealing
with military affairs.
His talk, "The True American," will
he the more interesting because Mr.]
Kahn is a native of the Grand Duchy
of Baden, though he has lived in the
United States since he was five years
of age.
BURTONSETS OVATION
Al EDUCTION MEETING
Addressing an assemblage of ap-
proximately 5,000 people Tuesday at
the convention of the National Edu-
cation association at Atlantic City,
President Marion L. Burton was
greeted with an ovation which was
proclaimed in Eastern newspapers to
be the greatest accorded any speaker
at the conference.
President Burton's subject was
"The Probable Future of Education
in the United States - Its Policies
and Program." When he had conclud-
ed his address, he was obliged to ap-
pear on the platform again in re-
sponse to the insistent applause of the
delegates.
From Atlantic City the President
went to Philadelphia, where he spoke
at a banquet of University alumni.
President Burton, who was accompan-

ied by Mrs. Burton, returned to Ann
Arbor yesterday morning.
CORRECTION
In an article in Tuesday's Daily re-
garding eligibility of athletes, a state-
ment was made that C. E. Turnbull
and Clark Wimbles, both members of
the baseball squad, had been placed
on probation. These- men are both
ineligible but are not on probation.

NO NORMAL PRICE
LEVEL UNTIL 1930
-FRIDAY.
"It will take fully a decade forl
wholesale prices in the United States
to return to normal, figuring the prices
in 1913 as 100 percent," said Prof.
David Friday in an interview yester-
day afternoon. "After the Civil war'
it took 14 years before wholesale
prices came back to the level of 1860."
Professor Friday stated that at the
present time prices were at 177. In
January, 1920, they were 248, 272 in'
May 1920, and 189 last December. "Of
course when wages and materials are
at the same level you could say that
those prices were normal, but figur-
ing the prices in 1913 to be normal it
will take 10 years to come back to that
level. In this case it will require out-
side forces to bring about the decline."
FARRELL AND PRATT TALK AT
LUNCHEON OF DETROIT ALUMNI
Steve Farrell and Derrill Pratt,
track and baseball coaches, respec-
tively, and James Schermerhorn, ed-
itor of the Detroit Times, were the
principal speakers Wednesday at the
luncheon of the University of Michi-
gan club of Detroit.

Bulletins
(By a Staff Correspondent)
Chicago, Ill., March 4.-Coach
Farrell and the Varsity track
team arrived here o,time. On the
first part of their trip, the team
changed trains for Champaign.
The men are all in good condition
and passed a good part of the
trip playing bridge. Coach Far-
rell was in good humor and dis-
cussed the meet hopefully, while
Captain Butler and his men are
looking forward eagerly to their
first workout on the cinders.
The members of the team paid
a solemn tribute to the memory of
Joe Baker this evening as the train
passed slowly through Porter, Ind.
(Via Radio) ,
Purdue tankmen defeated the
Indiana mermen last night by the
score of 48-20.

President Harding s Address

HRDING AND COOLIDGE INAUGURATED
BY SIMPLE CEREMONIES: RETIR-IN-G
'PRESIDENT TOO . ILL TO'D PAR0T

(Editorial Note-Limited space ne-
cessitates that the address be con-
densed as much as possible; only sa-
lient paragraphs are given.)
"The recorded progress of our re-
public, materially and spiritually, in
itself proves the wisdom of the in-
herited policy on non-involvment in
Old World affairs. Confident of our
ability to work out our own destiny
and jealously guarding our right to
do so, we seek no part in directing the
destinies of the Old World. We do
not mean to be entangled. We will
accept no responsibility except as our
own conscience and judgment in each
instance may determine.
Ready for League
"We are ready to associate our-
selves with the nations of the world,
great and small, for conference, for
counsel, to seek the expressed views
of world opinion, to recommend a way
to approximate disarmament and re-
lieve the crushing burdens of mili-
tary and naval establishment. We
elect to participate in suggesting plans
for mediation, conciliation and arbi-
tration, and would gladly join in that
expressed conscience of progress,
which seeks to clarify and write the
laws of international relationship, and
establish a world court for the dispo-
sition of such justifiable questions as
nations are agreed to submit there-
to, in expressing aspirations, in seek-
ing practical plans, in translating hu-
manity's new concept of righteous-
ness, justice and its hatred of war
into recommended action we are!
ready most heartily to unite, but every
commitment must be made in the ex-
ercise of our national sovereignty.
Would Lessen Wars
"America is ready to encourage,
eager to initiate, anxious to participate
in any seemly program likely to les-
sen the probability of war and pro-
mote that brotherhood of mankind
which must be God's highest concep-
tion of human relationship.
"We must understand that ties of
trade bind nations in closest intimacy
and none may receive except as he
gives. We have not strengthened ours
in accordance with our resources or
our genius, notably on our own con-
tinent where a glaxy of republics re-
flect the glory of new world democ-
racy, but in the new order of finance
and trade we mean to promote, en-
large activities and seek expanded
confidence.
"Our supreme task is the resump-

tion of our onward normal way. R'e-
construction, readjustment, restora-
tion - all these must follow. I would
like to have them. If it will lighten
the spirit and add to' the resolution
with which we take up the task, let
me repeat for our nation, we shall
give no people just cause to make war
upon us. We hold no national preju-
dices, we entertain no spirit of re-
venge, we do not hate, we do not cov-
et, we dream of no conquest, nor boast
of armed prowess.
Must Unify
"If, despite this attitude, war is
again forced upon us, I earnestly hope
a way may be found, which will
unify our individual and collective
strength and consecrate all America,
materially and spiritually, body and
soul, to national defense.
"I speak for administrative efficien-
ey, for lightened tax burdens, for
sound commercial practices, for ade-
quate credit facilities, for sympathet-'
ic concern for all agricultural prob-
lems, for the omission of unnecessary
interference of government with busi-
ness, for an end to government's ex-
periment in business and for more ef-
ficient business in government ad-
ministration. With all of this must
attend a mindfulness of the human
side ,of all activities so that social,
industrial and economic justice will
be squared with the purposes of a
righteous people.
Labor Disputes Conferences
"I had rather submit our industrial
controversies to the conference table
in advance than to a settlement table
after conflict and suffering. The earth
is thirsting for the cup of good will.
Understanding is its fountain source.
I would like to acclaim an area of
good feeling amid dependable prosper-
ity and all the blessings which attend.
"It has been proved again and again
that we cannot, while throwing our
markets open to the world, maintain
American standards of living and op-
portunity and hold our industrial em-
inence in such unequal competition.
There is a luring fallacy in the theory
of banished barriers of trade, but pre-
served American standards require
our higher production costs to be re-
flected in our tariffs on imports. To-
day as never before, when peoples are
seeking trade, restoration and expan-
sion, we must adjust our tariffs to this
new order, We seek participation in
the world's exchanges, because there-
in lies our way to widened influence
and the triumphs of peace. We know
(Continued on Page Eight)

LITTLE POMP ATTENDS TAKING
OF OFFICE BY 29TH
EXECUTIVE
TEN CABINET CHOICES
APPROVED BY SENATE
Wilson, Assisted to Automobile, Goes
to Capitol But Strength Fals
Before Arrival
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 4. - The reins
of presidential authority passed
from Woodrow Wilson to Warren G.
Harding today in an inaugural cere-
mony at. once the simplest 'and the
most dramatic of a generation,
The drama centered about the re-
tirement of Woodrow Wilson to pri-
vate life. Insistent to the last mo-
ment that he, would carry out a re-
tiring president's customary part in
the ceremonies, Mr. Wilson finally
yielded to, the pleading of relatives
and to the warning of his physician
that he might endanger his life and
only accompanied his successor to the
capitol.
Wilson Weak
As he descended from the White
House portico to enter the . waiting
automobile, secret service men plac-
ed his feet on each descending step.
When he left the car to enter the
capitol he was practically lifted up a
flight of steps by an attendant and al-
so he walked alone with the aid of a
cane to the President's room, where
he signed bills. He told Senator Knox,
chairman of the congressional inaug-
ural committee, thgt he was not equal
to participating in the ceremony of
inaugurating Vice-president Coolidge
in the senate chamber nor in the cer-
emony of inaugurating President
Harding on the portico facing the
plaza outside.
After a few moments at the capitol
Mr. Wilson went to his private home
to become "plain Woodrow Wilson
now," as he expressed it, and never
even glanced at the White House as
he passed by on his way.
Harding Revives Ceremony
Before Mr. Harding had been Pres-
ident an hour he revived a precedent
set by George Washington by confer-
ring with the senate in executive ses-
sion, submitting in person the nom-
inations of his 10 cabinet office, all
of which were immediately confirmed.
Within another hour he had gone
to the White House "to hang up his
hat and go to work," as he himself
had said, and unlock the White House
gate, which for four years has been
closed to the public. The public cel-
ebrated the event by actually over-
running the grounds and peeping
through the window to see the new
President in conference with the cab-
inet officers.
Mr. Harding took the oath of of-
fice at 1:18 p. in., exactly eight years
to the minute from the time the same
words of obligation were spoken by
Mr. Wilson at his first inauguration.
The inauguration ceremonies, con-
(Continued on Page Eight)

SENIOR, JUNIOR MEN TO
MEET SUNDAY AT UNION
All senior and junior men are
requested to meet at 3:30 o'clock
Sunday afternoon in the As-
sembly hall of the Union to hear
and discuss the reports of the
various committees on student
government.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL,
LeGrand A. Gaines, Jr.,
President.

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