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January 20, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

[VERSITY.

nday during the Univer-
ent Publications.
4TED PRESS j
entitled to the use for
ed to it or not otherwise
published therein.
>or, Michigan, as second

Maynard street.,

'vds, if signed, the sig-
but as an evidence of
hed in The Daily at the
led to The Daily offce.
consideration. N o mnn
incloses postage.
orse the sentimets ex

....... Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 1o16
..r.Business Manager
Phone 960 0r .2738
............ .Asst. Managing Editor
Cty Editor
i..Spors Editor
Women's Editor
..Telegraph Editor
EDITORIAL BOARD
H, Hardy Heth
Jr. .................Advertising Manager
.Issue Manager
~Office Manager
.Publication Manager'
.Circulation Manager
.Subscription Manager
..... Music Editor
.Literary Editor
......Exchiange Editor
Campaign Editor
... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...Efficiency Editor

on the campus, is probably carrying the idea too far.
There is one thing, however, that must be con-
stantly remembered by the students of the Univer-
sity in connection with the athletic problem. That
is, that there is' not one phase of the problem that
all the students of the University cannot take an
active part in. It is only when the students realize
this, that the athletic problem will be solved.
Gymnasium officials report that freshmen are
cutting their gymnasium classes with the same fre-
quency that has{been common in years past. It is
difficult apparently to make certain freshmen under-
stand that they must attend classes, including those
for physical betterment, regularly or else suffer a
petialty for which they alone are responsible. While
no credit is given for gymnasium work, neverthe-
less it is imperative that it should be taken with
regularity to.prevent a reduction in credit.
A chance to make up work for those who missed
classes will be given during the two weeks of exam-
inations. If any one thinks that he can escape
gymnasium classes from now on he is deceiving
himself, for it will be necessary to make up what-
ever periods have been lost during the specified
time. Under no circumstances can the work he
merely passed over without 4 reduction inm general
credit following.
Freshmen will findl from the experience of those
who have gone before that the present is the time
to do whatever work is required. Epecially is this
true of gymnasium classes which if left until exam-
ination week, are likely to come at the time least
convenient for the student preparing for his ex-
aminations.
._.. .
* The Telescope
Maybe There "Ain't No Sich Animal"
Demosthenes walked slowly along State Street,
his lantern brightly lighted, a worried look in his
eyes.
"What's the matter,.Demos," hailed a passerby.
"Are youstill locking for, that honest man?"
"No," answered Demosthenes, "I'm looking for
something. harder to find. I'm looking for that*
"regular" co-ed which the Michigan Man talks
about in his article in this month's Chimes.
We Repeat, Many a True Word Is Spoken in Jest
"I never saw so much pushing, scrapping and
fighting as there was at the gym Saturday night."
"But I thought they didn't allow such things in
a basketball game."
"They don't. All this rough stuff was done by
the crowd trying to get in to see the game."

. DETROIT UNITEP LINES 1111111111111111liliiillil0ii~llimliilliiltltl
(Oct. 26, 1919)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
. (EasternStandard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:«ro a.
'It., and hu yto o9 1)p . n.W a ave, W h m again-
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
" Ii"r An: \. .GREEN FELT BAGS $.5 each .
presses mnake local stops west of Ann ,Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:c5 a. in., 9:o a
n. d every two lours to o:o5 p .n., o :Ao UNIVERSITY
. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:4 p. in., 1:10 ro ! ______
a. in, and to Saline, change at psilanti.-}E
Zl~slani:BOOKSTORES
Local Cars West Bound--7:48 a. m. and -
=2:2o a. im. s itt!{t 1t lititll tittlr i m 111i l l tt'{rlli t u illrtlliliitil tt llirll1111i10

A

E EDITORS
s; I. Adams
Brophy
)RIAL T.!Au'-

Brewster Campbell
John I. Dakin

Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt
Robert C. Angell
Robert D. Sage
Thomas J. Whinery

STAFF

1. P. Joyce
Robt. Somerville
Arthur L. Glazer
F. M. Heath

> secure information concerning news for
y should see the issue editor,' who has full
be printed that night.
rs for the week are as follows:
ern, Monday night; Thomas H.
night ; Brewster P. Campbell,
George Brophy, Thursday night;
riday night ; Thornton Sargent,
AY, JANUARY 20 1920.

LEARN TO DANCE
Don't'Be Wall Flower
PROF, MITTENTHALS
OANCING S OOOL
ARMORY
Every Friday Evening
7.00 to 8:30
TERMS:
Gentleen,, 8 lessons.....$8.00
Single lesson............1.25"
Ladies, 8 lessons......3.00
Single lesson ,. ..... .50
Spend your money at the best
school and get results. I guar-
antee to teach you all the latest
steps, in less than term and
make you a perfect and graceful
dancer. New class begins Fri-
day, Jan. 23; also advince class
same evening. Any person wish-
ing to learn the proper way to
d nce the Fox Trot come to me.
I each the.right way. Seventy-
five per cent o dancers dance
with the Fox Trot music but
don't dance the Fox trot the
right way-by all means they
think they do, but they are
cheating themselves, not the or-
chestra. Also position ab well
and cheek' dancing is Improper
and out of place in a Ballroom.
It is not taught by any dancing
instructor. For depoitment and
grace attend my school. Don't.
be backward. Learn now so
you can attend the parties. No
spectators, strictly private.
Private lessons given from 5
to 6:30. A special rate if can
organize small class. And .each
pupil is guaranteed to learn to
dance.

these well-known
A nn' A rbor dealerssl , U N A L '

AL
T .r

the fazmous
Candy of the South

eting of the entire Editorial
o'clock today in room 5, Press
club will meet at 4:30 o'clock.;
iAN ATHLETIC SPIRIT.
hetes for Michigan seems to"
phase of the athletic problem,
we have them, we must keep
r, keep them in trim, and keep

E.'C. Edsill
Fisher's Pharmacy
Sugden Drug Company
John A. Tice
Tuttle Luich Room

TKE CA"DY OF THE SLTh

Dear Noah. .-
My husbahd talks in his sleep at nights.
any way of breaking him of this habit?

'
w

Is there

ive:

L

.

I

eugiwe.
keep them in the University, they must be
:d correctly and given, credit for the work
do This, does not mean that they must be
"little tin gods," but that they must receive
due recognition from the Athletic association,
tudents.
r instance, every senior athlete should be given
W" blanket with stars on it showing years of
:e on Michigan athletic teams. As is done by
najority of other universities, t'his should be"
Ain addition to the sweater.
would be well to have a formal presentation of
blankets in front of the Library in the spring
rery year. It has been suggested that the
" be given out at this time also.
e plan. would at least prove to the athletes, be-
th'ey left the 'school, that the University was
d them whenever they fought for the Maize
Blue. It is true that the Athletic assocfation
>aid out considerable money this year for
>vemlents, but it is probable that it could afford
y for the blankets. The plan would certainly'
the backing of the student body.
e students of the University can help but lit-
keep the athletes of the'University, in trim.
ge, majority of this must be left to the athletes'
selves. 'Th, coach has asked that all football
go over to'the gymnasium daily throughout the
e year in order that they will be in good shape=
he football season next fall. Some have-not
lied with the coach's wishes. Pressure must
ade to bear on the delinquent ones by the other
nts of the University.
ligibility played a stronger part in Michi-
football history last fall than in any other
rsify.0 Some critics, place all the blame for
igan's poor showing on the fact that she had
my ineligible football men.
system of tutoring for the athletic men might
toward professionalism. However, when an
: is low in any subject, it is the duty of the
it to help him bring up his work, not by do-
ay of the work for him but merely by giving
stions.
t primarily, it is the duty of the athlete him-
: see that he is eligible. No athlete, no mat-
iw wel he can perform on Ferry field, can get
gh tie University on his athletic reputation.
supgr estion made by' some students that the

Worried.
You might try giving him a chance when he is
awake.
A Short Story Entitled The Secret or How to
Get By
If you flatter some of your profs all of the time,
and all of your profs some of the time you won't
flunk.
Our idea of a paradox is a fellow that's got
checJs. inhis pants and still is broke.

'

r
ND here is the top-most cigarette-the
highest point of smoking pleasure and
satisfaction-the SPUfR CIGARETTE.
Studied "from the ground up"-in seed,
soil, plant and culture. Studied in blend-
ing, studied in makirng, studied in packing.
. There's(not a chance left that it can ever
be among the "Also Rans,"

A s

N Our Daily Novelette
They were gathered around the table, the father,
the mother and their only son. Time had not dealt
very kindly with this couple-the old mans' hair
was plentifully tinged with gray while the face of
the mother showed lines which only time and worry
can bring. The soon, a stalwart lad of 20 summers,
had been summoned home from college, and as
yet he had failed to grasp the full import of the
trouble.
Finally the old man broke the oppressive si-
lence. He cleared his throat and then spoke in a
voice which trembled with emotion. "My boy,
your mother and I have tried to give you those ad-
vantages which we missed, and yet somehow de-
spite our efforts it looks as though you will have
to give up your college work. We get up at 4 in
the morning and work until 10 at night and-
and,," the old man choked up and could say no
more.
I.II.
The boy was profoundly moved as he realized
for the first time the sacrifices which his parents
had made for him. Tears of gratitude welled from
his eyes as he thought of this aged couple battling
against adversity. He 'knit his brows and tried to
think of some way out of the predicament. At last
his brow cleared and in a voice shrill with triumph
he shouted, "I have it, you will both have to work
nights." J. W. K.

:.:

,'

r
' _

SPUR'S Points:

Spur Cigarettes are crimped, not pasted,
making an easier-drawing and slower-
burning cigarette.
El-nded in a new way from American
and Imported tobaccos, bringing out to
the full that good old tobacco taste,
Satiny imported paper.
in a smart brown and silver packet,
threeld, to pescrve their delicious taste
and fragi-ance.
- a f

20c

Famous Closing Lies
"My speech certainly carried conviction,"
the lawer as his client got io years.

said

*h"

)Alf COU1N.

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