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March 08, 1983 - Image 2

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Page 2-Tuesday, March 8, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Germans elect NATO advocates

From AP and UPI
BONN, West Germany - Chancellor Helmut Kohl
said yesterday his election victory was a mandate for
deployment of new U.S. nuclear missiles in West
Germany.
But the new - and smallest - party in Parliament
vowed to fight the weapons with "sit-ins, lie-ins" and
other demonstrations and parliamentary maneuvers.
That party, the four-year-old "Greens" won its first
parliamentary seats by winning 5.6 percent of the
vote.
KOHL'S COALITION of Christian Democrats and
Free Democrats won an overwhelming victory in the
election Sunday, defeating the Social Democratic
Party candidate Jans-Jochen Vogel, whose can-
didacy had been supported by Mowcow.
The Christian Democrats and their allied party in
Bavaria won 244 seats in the Bundestag or

Parliament and the Free Democrats 34. The Social
Democrats trailed with 193 seats.
Kohl said the election results showed "the majority
of the voters support our determination to stand by
the NATO two-track decision" to begin deploying 572
new American medium-range nuclear missiles in
Western Europe later this year if the Soviet-
American arms negotiations in Geneva fail to
produce an agreement.
"WE RECEIVED a clear mandate for our policy of
peace in freedom, in the Western alliance and in par-
tnership with the United States," Kohl said.
If the Geneva talks still are deadlocked at the end
of this year, "we will deploy," he said in a news con-
ference. "Our goal is no new U.S. missiles and no
Soviet missiles. But we do not have a take it or leave
it policy."
The chancellor said he would keep the same

economic and foreign policies he has pursued since
the Free Democrats broke up their alliance with the
socialists last September and joined forces with the
Christian Democrats and their Bavarian affiliate, the
Christian Social Union. The Free Democratic defec-
tion enabled Kohl to oust Schmidt.
the new Bundestag must meet within 30 days to
elect a chancellor. Kohl's re-election is assured since
the Free Democrats promised their support to him
before the eleciton. Meanwhile, he refused to discuss
rumors that he would replace Foreign Minister Hans-
Dietrich Genscher, the leader of the Free Democratic
party, with Bavarian Premier Franz-Josef Strauss,
the leader of the Christian Social Union.
West Germany is scheduled to receive 108 ballistic
Pershing-2 missiles and 96 cruise missiles under the
NATO plan to begin deploying 572 medium-range
missiles in Western Europe at the end of this year if
the arms talks fail.

Controversial bishop calls war immoral

(Continued from Page 1)
the bishops' letter, and told how it will
affect the 51 million catholics in this
country.
The document, Gumbleton said,
provides catholics with two options in
the face of war. The first is pacifism.
"This, in fact, was the earliest of
Christian traditions," he said. "This
will be the first time an official catholic
document of the American Catholic
Church will set this forth as a clear op-
tion and even as a clear call to
Christians to follow."
THE OTHER option sets conditions
under which catholics are allowed to
fight. Gumbleton said that in modern
war, these conditions are almost never

fulfilled.
"The presumption is against war,''
he said, "and you may not participate
unless you know the conditions are
fulfilled."
Gumbleton said these views are not
welcomed in the Pentagon, but said it is
the duty of catholics to stick by their
moral beliefs.
GUMBLETON SAID the most con-
troversial part of the letter was its
criticism of current U.S. nuclear policy.
"The conclusions of the letter, for the
msot part, directly challenge the
positions of our government," he said.
"We want this letter to help shape the
debate on (the nuclear arms) issue, and
we have both the privilege and respon-

sibility to do this," he said. "We must
bring to this issue a view which the
government will not bring to it, and that
is a moral perspective."
The bishops declared that both
nuclear strikes against population cen-
ters and the use of nuclear warheads
for first strikes are immoral, as are
nuclear attacks aimed at military
targets. They also questioned the
American theory of deterrence, Gum-
bleton said.
DETERRENCE, Gumbleton said,
"involves us in this constant escalation
of the arms race" which wastes resour-
ces that could be used to combat hunger
and disease. It also assumes that the
deterring party is committed to using
the weapons, he said. "That is a terrible
religious and moral evil."
Gumbleton said deterrence is only
acceptable under certain conditions: It
must not be an end in itself, but rather a
stage in progress toward complete
nuclear disarmament. He said most
American military projects could not
stand up to this test.
Gumbleton said the bishops's letter is
not a new commandment for catholics
to follow.
"THIS LETTER will not dictate to
catholic people how they must
respond," he said, adding that the letter
is designed to invite people to enter the

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debate over nuclear armament and
decide for themselves.
"(Bishops) are confident that most
people will reach the same con-
clusions," he said.
American bishops will vote in May
whether or not to accept the letter as
part of the official catholic doctrine in
this country.
GUMBLETON defended unilateral
disarmament, sayding "if it is the right
thing to do, then you have an obligation
to do it." If harm to our country were to
result form unilateral disarmament,
we would be in the right, he said.
"Therehave always been martyrs."
he defied the contention that by
fighting the Soviet Union the United
States would be defending Christian
values from an atheistic state.
"If I am ready to do the very same
thing that they are doing, then I don't
have to be taken over by the Soviet
Union to lose my values. Obviously,
I've already given them up."
Gumbleton also questioned the
American perception of the Soviet
threat, saying, "When the Soviet Union
says they will not use nuclear arms fir-
st, why can't we believe that they are
really inviting us to come to an
agreement? It is in their interests to
stop the arms race."
About 20 students attended the
speech. Annelies Moeser, an LSA junior
who identifies herself as "the only
church history major at the Univer-
sity," said she attended the lecture
because "As a member of the catholic
church, I feel its important to see how
our church is responding to modern
issues and to look for guidance from
church leaders."
Mary Pat Ziolkowski, who is working
on a master's in social work, said she
thought Gumbleton's speech was "a
long time in coming." "I want him to
go further," she said.

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HOUSING DIVISION
WEST QUADRANGLE
RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATIONS FOR SPRING/SUMMER 1983
AVAILABLE STARTING FEBRUARY 28, 1983 IN 1500 S.A.B.
POSITIONS INCLUDE: Resident Director and Resident Advisor
Advisory positions require the completion of a minimum of 48 undergraduate credit
hours toward program for Resident Advisory positions; Graduate status for Resident
Director positions. Qualified undergraduate applications may be considered for the
Resident Director positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U of M student on the Ann Arbor Campus
during the period of employment. (2) Must have completed a minimum of 48 under-
graduate credit hours toward program by the end of the 1982 Fall Term. (3) Preference
will be given to applicants who have lived in the residence halls at the University level
for at least one year. (4) Undergraduate applicants must have a minimum of a 2.50
cumulative grade point average in the school or college in which they are enrolled.
Graduate applicants must be in good academic standing in the school or college in which
they are enrolled. (5) Preference is given to applicants who do not intend to carry heavy
academic schedules and who do not have rigorous outside commitments. (6) Consider-
ation will only be given to qualified applicants who will be available both Spring/
Summer Terms. (7) Proof of these qualifications will be required.
Current staff and other applicants must come to this office and complete a new application:
Staff selection and placement shall be determined in the following order:
1 . Current staff in West Quadrangle.
2. Staff recommended in West Quadrangle for 1983-84 academic year.
3. Current staff throughout the Residence Hall system.
4. Other qualified applicants.
APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 4:00 P.M., FRIDAY, MARCH 11, 1983
A NON-DISCRIMINATORY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Turkish coal mine explosion
kills 67 miners, traps 30
ANKARA, Turkey - Gas exploded in a coal mine in the northern province
of Zonguldak yesterday, killing 67 miners, injuring 86, and trapping 30 men
more than 1,000 feet underground, the state radio reported.
The semi-official Anatolia news agency reported 120 injured. It said they
were treated at hospitals in Zonguldak, the provincial capital, and Istanbul,
210 miles to the west.
The radio report said 406 miners were believed to have been underground
on the afternoon shift at the Armutcuk mine when the blast caved in the
mine.
About five hours later, officials said most of the miners were rescued. The
rescued miners for the most part had been in the upper levels of the mine.
There was no official word on the chances of saving those still trapped.
The general director of Turkey's state-owned coal enterprise, Hasan
Mumcu, left for Zonguldak upon hearing news of the explosion, Anatolia
reported.
According to official figures 660 miners have lost their lives in similar ac-
cidents in the Zonguldak coal producing region in the past decade.
Reagan's policies draw protest
from nation s mayors in D.C.
WASHINGTON - Leaders of the nation's cities took their complaints
about President Reagan's programs to the White House yesterday, deman-
ding sharp reductions in the growth of defense spending and cancellation of
the upcoming income tax cut.
The positions, announced by the National League of Cities at its annual
winter meeting, followed by a week similar demands by the governors, and
reflected a growing anger by strapped state and local governments over
federal budget deficits.
Standing shoulder to shoulder at a news conference to announce the ac-
tions by the league's directors, Democratic Mayor George Latimer of St.
Paul and Republican Mayor George Voinovich of Cleveland said the country
is hurting.
"The central, major financial difficulty of our nation is related to the
runaway deficits," Latimer said.
Iran resists lower oil prices
I'F
LONDON - OPEC rebel Iran refused to accept a lowering of oil prices and
the 13-nation oil cartel postponed an informal meeting yesterday aimed at
agreeing on a moderate price reduction to avert a full-blown price war.
"The glut in the market is artificial and, if we resist, all the problems will
be solved," Iranian Oil Minister Mohammed Gharazi told Tehran radio
shortly after leaving the Inter-Continental hotel, where the OPEC summit
had been scheduled yesterday afternoon.
Venezuelan Oil Minister Humberto Calderon Berti said the summit,
originally set for yesterday, was put off at the suggestion of Iran, which wan-
ts the base price kept at $34. Iran keeps its price $8 per barrel cheaper on the
spot market and would have to drop the price to keep the $8 edge.
Mohammad Gharazi, the Iranian oil minister, told reporters his country
"will never" agree to a reduction in the Organization of Petroleum Expor-
ting Countries' official base price.
He also demanded Saudi Arabia's production quota be slashed 1 million
barrels to 3 million a day - the same level Iran is believed seeking for itself.
Iran is currently producing 2.7 million barrels daily.
Pope pleads for human rightsx
GUATEMALA CITY - Pope John Paul II appealed to Guatemala's
military president yesterday to protect human life and due process of law
despite his right-wing regime's war against leftist guerrillas.
The pontiff also gave the Roman' Catholic Church's emphatic support to
the country's large numbers of Maya-descended Indians, who often suffer
discrimination and abuse. 1
The pope, on the fifth stop of his eight-nation tour, met privately with
President Efrain Rios Montt, a general and a born-again Christian who last
week ignored a papal plea to call off the execution of six convicted leftist
terrorists.
"I urge government leaders, especially those who feel the flame of
Christian faith in their hearts, to carry out measures so justice can reach the
less protected," the pontiff told 500,000 people at an outdoor Mass.
Senate panel adopts relief bill
WASHINGTON - The Senate Appropriations Committee gave unanimous
approval yesterday to a $3.9 billion package of recession relief,$1 billion less
than the Democratic-controlled House approved last week for jobs and
humanitarian assistance.
The measure, which also provides $5 billion to assure continued payment
of unemployment benefits, is expected to come up for debate in the full
Senate later in the week. Easy passage is expected, although Sen. Mark Hat-
field, the Oregon Republican who chairs the committee, said he would at-
tempt to reduce spending on the jobs portion of the bill by about $373 million
to accommodate the wishes of President Reagan.
The bill was adopted by voice in the Republican-controlled committee as
the panel took steps to make sure the funds are targeted to areas of high
unemployment.

In all, about $2.1 billion will be distributed on the basis of unemployment,
and under the complicated formula adopted, 15 states will benefit par-
ticularly. The 15, all of which had unemployment higher than the national
average for all of 1982, include Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Michigan, and Mississippi. Also on the list are Ohio, Oregon,
Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Washington, West Virginia, and
Wisconsin.
Vol. XCIII, No. 122
Tuesday, March 8, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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