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March 08, 1983 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-08

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17

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 8, 1983-Page 3
computers added to

help financial aid office

By BARBARA MISLE
Three-hour waits outside the Univer-
sity's financial aid office may be a thing
of the past next month when 17 new
computer terminals arrive to help
speed up work, officials said yesterday.
Each financial aid conselor will have
a terminal in his or her office which will
make student records more easily ac-
cessible, said Harvey Grotrian, direc-
tor of financial aid.
WHEN A student submits an ap-
plication for aid, his or her financial
background is stored on index cards
and filed on one of the office's six com-
puter terminals.
The additional computers, which cost
$1,000 each, will allow a student's
financial background to be entered
immediately onto the computer and
decrease the wait for students who call
or stop by the office to check their
records..
The computers will also cut down on
errors when entering information into a
student's file, which Grotrian says will
help the office run more efficiently.
"RATHER THAN add five or ten

more staff persons and rely on Rolodex
cards and paper files, we have chosen
to rely on technology to bring efficien-
cy," said Grotrian.
The office won't save any money
because of the cost of the terminals, but
the new computers will help the office
handle recent changes in financial aid
programs.
Stiffer eligibility requirements for
federal financial aid and guaranteed
student loans has made the application
procedure more confusing, Grotrian
said.
SINCE 1981 the federal government
has raised interest rates and adjusted
eligibility standards in the GSL

Program three times, including a man-
datory needs test for students from
families with income above $30,000.
The computers are part of a long-
term project to be completed by 1985.
By that time, the system will be able to
print follow-up letters to students after
the office receives their applications.

Daily Photo by WENDY GOULD
Hollywood hang-ups
Engineering sophomores Steve Zaidel and Tom Gawlick thumb through the selection of movie posters on sale yesterday
at the Union. The sale will end today.

Fla. town may lose charter

HACIENDA VILLAGE, Fla. (AP) -
The state senator who represents this;
hamlet is campaigning hard to wipe it
Off the map because it has "gone ber-
serk" issuing thousands of lucrative
traffic tickets.
But residents say they've got the best
Oolice department around. Last year,
pickets for moving violations alone
totaled more than $78,000, and the of-
ficers raked in a full third of city
revenue.

"A CANCER" and "a disgrace,"
says state Sen. Tom McPherson, a
Democrat from Cooper City.
Today he will ask Broward County's
15 other lawmakers to endorse Hacien-
da Village's disincorporation. The
decision is up to the state legislature.
Hacienda Village, a 34-year-old town
four miles west of Fort Lauderdale on
the fringes of the Everglades, has 27
police oficers. That's one policeman for
every five dwellers in the 130-resident

mobile-home
population li
minute numbe
than 400 com
Hacienda Vill
crime rate.
The rational
serves as de
was clear, a
Dassdorf, who
recently said:
write enoughc

over traffic tickets
park where the entire our salary."
ves. Paradoxically, the Mayor Sherman Crise retorts to the
r of residents and more criticism with an obscenity.
mercial. properties give "You talk about writing 5,000 tickets
age the state's highest a year, and that's nothing," Crise said,
a gold police badge flashing from his
le inside the trailer that hip.
partment headquarters "In fact, when I found out how many
former officer, Pamela cars were going through here, I told the
now works in Georgia, police chief to write double the number
"We were expected to of tickets they've been writing, or I'd
citations a day to cover fire each and every one of them."

International Student Pugwash
CONFERENCE ON
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY
& GLOBAL RESPONSIBILITY
WORKING GROUPS
The Impact of Computers (Including Robotics) on the Workplace
Priorities for Biotechnology
International Resource Development
Managing Technology
International Security and Nuclear Weapons
ABOUT THE CONFERENCE
The conference will offer 75 students from around the world the
opportunity to meet with distinguished senior participants in an
intensive seminar format. Student participants will be chosen
through a competitive selection process.
THE APPLICATION DEADLINE IS MARCH 15, 1983.
SENIOR PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE: RUTH ADAMS, Editor
of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists; ROSEMARY CHALK,
American Assn. for the Advancement of Science; ,HARLAN
CLEVLAND, former U.S. Ambassador to NATO; ALEXANDER
GLASS, President of KMS Fusion, Inc.; JOHN ROLLWAGON,
JR., President of the Arms Control Association; LEONARD
WOODCOCK, former President of the United Auto Workers;
BURKE ZIMMERMAN, CETUS Corporation; 20 OTHERS FROM
UNIVERSITIES, INDUSTRY, GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC INT-
EREST ORGANIZATIONS.
STAFF POSITIONS ARE A VAILABLE IN.
* Media/Public Relations
* Research
* Management/Planning
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD CONTA CT
Michael B. Berger, c/o I.P.P.S. 763-4212
Sponsored by International Student Pugwash, The University of
Michigan Collegiate Institute for Values and Science, and Institute of
Public Policy Studies.
Faculty Coordinator: Nicholas H. Steneck, Collegiate Institute for Values and Science.

HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
The 21st Ann Arbor Film Festival opens today at the Michigan Theatre.
The festival received more than 250 entries from independent filmmakers
this year, 100 of which have been selected for presentation throughout the
week. Winners will be named Sunday. Screenings are at 7, 9, and 11 p.m.,
and cost $2.50 for one show or $6 for an entire evening.
Films
Japanese Studies - The Twilight Years, 9:30 a.m., Lorch.
Performances
University Players -'"The Father,"8 p.m., Trueblood Theatre.
Mosher-Jordan - University Honors Quartet performs Brahms string
quartet, opus 51, no. 1, 10 p.m., Jordan Lounge.
School of Music - Piano recital, Rachelle McCabe, 8 p.m., Recital Hall;
Vocal Recital, Rebecca Schumacher, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Speakers
Center for Human Growth and Development - Barbara Anderson,
"Diabetes and the Family: Parent and Child Responsibilities in Treat-
ment," noon, Rm. 1000, 300 N. Ingalls Bldg.
Communications - Henry Geller, "The First Amendment and the News
Technology," 3:10 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Chinese Studies - Judy Wyman, "Watch Out for the Foreign Guests,"
noon, Commons Rm., Lane Hall.
Geology - Robert Wintsch, "Chemomechanical Feedback Mechanisms in
Ductile Deformations," 4 p.m., Rm. 4001, C. C. Little.
Western European Studies - Hugo Brandt-Corstius, "The Miracles of
*Dutch," 8 p.m., International Center.
Industrial and Operations Engineering - Johan Strumpfer, "Searching
for an Object which Reacts for Women-Margot Duley-Morrow, "Women's
Herstory," 7:30 p.m., Unitarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw.
Chemistry - Michael Doyle, "Those Ubiquitous Nitrogen Oxides and their
Effects on Hemoproteins," 4 p.m., Rm. 1300, Chemistry.
Ann Arbor Public Library - Lawrence and Karen Kersten, "Your Per-
*sonality and the Ability to Love," 12:10 p.m.. Public Library.
English Language and Literature - Harold Bloom, "Criticism,
Prophesy, Canon-formation: The Sorrows of Facticity," 7:30 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheatre.
The Rudolf Steiner Institute - E. Katz-"The Image-Language of the
Zodiac VI: The Leo Aquarius Polarity," 8 p.m., 1923 Geddes.
Communications - Fred Fejes, "Current Issues in International Com-
munications Research," noon, Rm. 2050, Frieze.
Computing Center - Forrest Hartman, "Computing for Poets," 3:30 p.m.,
176 BSAD.
Meetings
American Studies - mtg. for students interested in American Studies,
3:30 p.m., 364 Lorch.
Women's International League for Peace and Freedom - International
Women's Day panel discussion on militarism and demonism, 7:30 p.m., 1420
Hill.
Lesbian NEtwork - 6:30 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Public Relations Club - meeting with film "Opinion of the Public," 4 p.m.,
1412 Mason.
Spartacus Youth League - forum on "Women's Liberation through
Socialist Revolution," 7:30 p.m., Conf. Rms. 4 & 5, Michigan Union.
PIRGIM - Forum on "Michigan's Fiscal Crisis: Facts, Fallacies and
How It Affects U-M," 8 p.m., Henderson Rm., Michigan League.
Miscellaneous
School of Art - seminar on "Marketing Arts in the 80s," 11:30 a.m., Art
and Arch. Aud.; 7 p.m., Pendleton Rm., Union.
Red Cross - Blood Drive, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., Huron High School.
Michigan Judo Club - 6:30 p.m., IM Sports Bldg.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
L At the Michigan League we behold

East Quad resident
shoots self in dorm room

(Continued from Page 1)
said East Quad Building Director Lan-
ce Morrow.
Housing officials said they did not
know where Katz got the gun, a .22
caliber rifle, the University has strict
policies against, firearms in the dor-
mitories. Even the rumor of a gun is
enough to send campus security into ac-
tion, said Dave Foulke, director of
housing residence operations. But, he
added, "It wouldn't be that hard for
someone to smuggle a firearm in."
Katz' roommate told housing officials
he had never seen the gun.
Foulke said a closed room with a few
stereos on the hall playing could easily
have hidden the noise. Added Ann Ar-
bor Police Sgt. Harold Tinsey, "A .22
(caliber rifle) doesn't make a very big
pop.,'I
After the death was discovered,
University peeracounselors held hall
meetings at the dorm, some of which
lasted until 7:30a.m.
Some East Quad residents said that
evey though the staff was being suppor-
tive, they felt information was being
withheld. "They had a hall meeting
with counselors, but when we asked
questions they were really vague," said
one East Quad resident.
This was the second known successful
suicide committed in a University dorm
in the last several months. In October,

LSA sophomore Alisa Jean Principe
took her own life in her Stockwell dor-
mitory room.

1

764-0558
764-0558

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Choose your own ending from a "cast of
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