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May 12, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-05-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MIHIA GDAILY

Wednesday, May 12, 1971

Page Eight THE MiCHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, May 12, 1971

HIGH PO
Tokyo fc
TOKYO - American consumer
advocate Ralph Nader, during a
recent visit to Tokyo cited the city
as "a notorious symbol of world-
wide pollution." In one smoggy
week last summer over 8,000 peo-
ple were treated in Tokyo hospit-
als for severe eye and skin irri-
tation and other pollution-induced
Ask bills to cut
campaign costs
(Continued from Page 7)
board advertising, the Hays-Ab-
bitt bill sets an over-all limit
within which the candidates can
spend as they choose.
T h e proposal would limit
spending on House races to $30,-
000, only half of what the Sen-
ate bill would allow. Both bills
set a flexible limit to Senate
races based on the size of the
state, and again, the Hays-Ab-
bitt limits would be lower.
The Hays-Abbitt bill would
require full disclosure of all
campaign expenditures and re-
ceipts, but not until 45 days af-
ter the election.
According to Hays, the pres-
ent requirement for advance no-
tice of contributions and expen-
ditures, which other bills would
continue, is too easily distorted

LLUTION
rces crisis
ailments. At least 41 other people
have died because of air pollution
in the heavily-industrialized city
of Yokkaichi, Japan. Tokyo traffic
policemen will not stand at busy
crossroads longer than 30 minutes,
and 40 junctions have oxygen ma-
chines available. Most of Japan's
gasoline is derived from Middle
Eastern oil, which contains par-
ticularly large quantities of pollu-
tants.
Japan's oil industry adds ben-
zene and toluene to the cheaper
grades of petroleum, which the
sun's rays convert into highly toxic
gases. Compounding the ecologi-
cal tragedy still further, the num-
ber of private cars in Tokyo has
doubled within the past three
years, and the :Japanese car man-
ufacturers, who equip automobiles
exported to the U.S. with exhaust-
control devises, install no such
equipment on their domestic cars.
Concern, outrage and protests
are mounting among the Japanese
almost as rapidly as the thicken-
ing air. According to a poll con-
ducted by the Japanese govern-
ment last year, 52 per cent of the
residents in the Tokyo and Osaka
metropolitan areas were convinced
they suffer from the effects of pol-
lution. And a third of those polled
blamed the pollution on the weak
measures taken by the central and
local governments.
See POLLUTION, Page 10

4-

The Look
WANTING
The Slacks:
M RACER FLARES
No-iron solids, stripes and patterns.
$10 to $12 a pair.

HERE'S
WHERE
!I1 ~:~IT'S
CORNER OF STATE & LIBERTY STS.
* DIAL 662-6264
GPEN5NOTESEECIALENDS
TIMES! TODAY
DU~liN 2SHOWS
DUMN so
HOIFIF1A1
3:45
6:15
PanavisiaooTechnicolor
Iv
i Geat
STARTS
a TOMORROW!

The Action
At MARTY'S
"Wall-Of-Slax"
You'll Find the
New Double Knits
By A-i
$18
exclusive boot slit and heel-to-toe slant.
SAFFELL & BUSCH
310 S. STATE ST.
Master Charge, BankAmericard, American Express
OPEN FRIDAY NITE TILL 8:30

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