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May 12, 1971 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-05-12

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Wednesday, Mny 12, 1971

THE MICHIGAN _DAILY {

Page Seven

Wednesday, May 12, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

n ews briefs
By The Associated Press
HOUSE LEADERS attempting to resurrect the supersonic
transport (SST) program predicted yesterday they will h a v e
enough votes to win.
Republican leader Gerald Ford of Michigan said a vote on the
issue was postponed until today after what Ford called "ten sure
votes" supporting the SST had to leave to attend Democratic party
functions last night.
The House halted all federal SST money effective last March
by only 11 votes, and the project was discontinued after the Senate
concurred by a 51-46 vote.
NORTH VIETNAM has begun preparing the Ho Chi Minh
trail for the rainy season, and the U.S. assigned much of its air
power yesterday to blast that supply network in Eastern Laos.
The monsoon, now starting to move in, will mean six months
of rain in the Laos panhandle and will hamper both the North
Vietnamese supply movement and U.S. air strikes.
In Phnom Penh, authoritative sources disclosed that Angkor
Wat, Cambodia's national treasure and the most famous temple
in Angkor in northwestern Cambodia, has been severely damaged
by a Cambodian army artillery barrage.
Meanwhile, in Washington, Sen. Thomas Eagleton (D-Mo.)
charged that American military commanders in Vietnam are oper-
ating under the assumption that the U.S. will maintain a residual
force and keep up bombing operations in Indochina "for an in-
definite period."
PRESIDENT NIXON asked Congress yesterday to "put our
money where our hopes are" and finance a massive new assault on
cancer.
While Nixon expressed confidence that Congress will swiftly
appropriate $100 million for his proposal to enlist American manage-
ment in a war on cancer, he is encountering some criticism and
opposition on methods of dispensing the funds.
Already, Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) has offered an alter-
native bill that would give the money to an independent agency rather
than to the National Institute of Health as Nixon suggested.
Dr. James Watson, Harvard professor and Nobel Prize-winning
molecular biologist, claims, "There are smart people at the Cancer
Institute but they aren't an extra $100 million smart."
Kennedy seeks also to make $200 million available for the re-
search.
4
BANK OF AMERICA branches in suburban Los Angeles were
fire bombed yesterday, police said.
Damage was minor at the two banks. They were the ninth and
tenth of such unexplained incidents in the Los Angeles area in
three weeks.
Since Feb. 1970 there have been 38 bombings and arson at-
tempts at branches of the Bank of America, the world's largest
commercial bank,

Dollar stable on foreign market;
international agreements sought

I

By The Associated Press
The U.S. dollar strength-
ened on European currency
exchanges yesterday, but big
money speculators held on
tightly to the West German
marks they bought by the
billion last week, hoping for
profits.
An acute shortage of dollars
developed in much of Western
Europe as speculators bought
up whatever was available to
make good the dollars they had
sold short to buy marks.
Dealers said there was a
strong indication speculators
were standing pat on their hold-
ings of marks, waiting for a
bigger increase in the value of
the West German currency than
the three per cent it showed
yesterday.
A thin trickle of marks was
sold by small traders in Europe,
exchange specialists said. This
seemed to be enough to hold the
rate with the dollar fairly
steady. Movements were in the
range of about one tenth of one
American cent valuing the mark
between 28 and 28.2 cents.
In Washington, five f o r m e r
high government officials
called yesterday for decisive ac-
tion to bring the U.S. balance
of payments deficit into line to
avert more internationalsmone-
tary crises. The officials, in a
statement prepared on behalf
of the prestigious Atlantic Coun-
cil, said bringing the payments
deficit into balance "is a na-
tional and international respon-
sibility of critical priority."
The council did not spell out
any solutions, nor did it say
what specifically should be done
to reduce the deficit.
In 1970, the balance of pay-
ments deficit reached $3.9 bil-
lion on a basis which includes all
foreign transactions and climb-
ed to a record $9.8 billion on a
basis which includes transactions
with foreign governments.

I mg!
°q

Cancer plea
President Nixon announces proposed legislation aimed at fighting
cancer. The President predicted that Congress will move the pro-
posal along swiftly. See News Briefs.
NEW RESTRICTIONS:
Bills seek to reduce
campcugn exes ses

WASHINGTON (A') - Chanc-
es that Congress this year will
put a limit on campaign spend-
ing were improved yesterday
with the introduction of a tough
election reform bill by two in-
fluential House members.
The bill would bar a winning
candidate from taking a seat in
the House or Senate if he ex-
ceeded t h e spending limit. It
was introduced by Rep. Wayne
Hays (D-Ohio) and Watkins
Abbitt (D-Va). -
The Hays-Abbitt bill sets low-
er spending ceilings for House,
Senate an d presidential elec-
tions than a bill already ap-

proved by the Senate Commerce
Committee.
The bill would also limit
presidential candidates to re-
ceiving and spending no more
than six cents for each person
in the United States - a total
of about $12 million with the
present population. The Senate
formula would allow just under
$14 million, which is about what
the Nixon-Agnew campaign cost
in 1968.
Unlike the Senate bill, which
fixes separate limits for spend-
ing on broadcast advertising,
newspaper advertising and bill-
See ASK, Page 8

THE WORD IS OUT ON
DONNY HATHAWAY

VOICES INSIDE (EVERYTHING IS EVERYTHING)
JE VOUS AINE (I LOVE YOU) I BELIEVE TO MY SOUL
MISTY + SUGAR LEE " TRYIN' TIMES
THANK YOU MASTER (FOR MY SOUL) * THE GHETTO
TO BE YOUNG, GIFTED AND BLACK

The word is out on Donny Hathaway.
A few weeks ago, the superb com-
poser-singer Carole King picked up eight
copies of Donny's first LP ("Everything
is Everything," produced by himself)
and distributed them to her heaviest
pals and gurus- such as Lou Adler and
James Taylor-with the exhortation to dig.
The next portent came at Aretha
Franklin's recent epochal appearance
at the Fillmore West, where she and Ray
Charles were rapping backstage about
Donny, who, in their modest opinions is
just about the "baddest" new entry on
the scene.
And a few days later, at the Criteria
Studios in Miami, superstar Steve Stills,
working on his new album, sounded me:
"Hey, what's the chance of Donny
Hathaway coming down to pick on my
album?"
The word is definitely out.
The liner notes to Donny's first LP
inform us that he(1) Was born in Chicago
in 1945(2) Attended Howard University-
(3) Played his first music jobs in the
Washington, D.C. area(4) Then achieved
heavy acclaim in the trade for his singing,
playing, arranging, composing, and
producing for such as Roberta Flack,
Curtis Mayfield, Jerry Butler, and others.
Here at Atlantic, where we have had
the privilege of working with Ray Charles,
Aretha Franklin and Otis Redding, we
are daring to hope that Donny eventually
may join them in the special pantheon of
those specially gifted few who:
Sing the best.
Play the best.
Compose the best.
Arrange the best.
As for his string, horn. and choral
arrangements, please listen to the soul-
shivering instrumental interlude in Giving
Up where first King Curtis' tenor sax

break lifts the record to a new elevation-
followed by a string ensemble that takes
it yet higher again-climax upon un-
believable climax. When I played his
Little Girl side for its writer, the wonderful
Billy Preston (great artist that he is in his
own right), Billy was transfixed by the
record-Donny's singing, keyboard
playing, and fantastic arrangement for
voices and strings.
And I would like to be there when
Bobby Scott hears what Donny does with
He Ain't Heavy, the definitive soul rendi-
lion that alot of people I know have been
waiting for.
I have been playing the album for some
weeks now for friends, family and col-
leagues, and the reaction is always the
same: joy and stunned disbelief. We are
in great hopes that this portends a wide
acceptance by an appreciative audir -
for Donny Hathaway and this alburn.
produced with abiding love, meticu-
care, and, we dearly pray, impe ccabe
taste.
My special thanks to our own King
Curtis, who found Donny Hathawayat
a trade convention and who brought hiI
posthaste to my office. Ano the same to
our own Arif Mardin who split with donny
the arranging chores, coming through
with his usual brilliance and unfailing
musicality. Listen to the flutes and celos
on Arif's treatment of Leon Russell's
ineffable A Song For You, and I think you
will see why Ari/'s is probably the lastest
growing reputation among the new breed
of arrangers and musicians. And thanks,
deeply, to our great rhythm section:
Cornell Dupree on guitar, Chuck Rainey
on bass, and the legendary Al Jackson,
who came up to New York from Memphis
to handle the percussion.
JERRY WEXLER

GIVING UP + A SONG FOR YOU " LITTLE GIRL
HE AIN'T HEAVY, HE'S MY BROTHER
MAGNIFICENT SANCTUARY BAND " SHE IS MY LADY
I BELIEVE IN MUSIC " TAKE A LOVE SONG
PUT YOUR HAND IN THE HAND

.r ns

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