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October 25, 1975 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-25

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 25, 1 e ?5

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, October 25, 1~?~

NOT EXPECTED TO PASS inorities protest
II urslpv nrnnos Raf d hill h l if

Hold-up a let-down

I

A-A ww- U.I'. -vw aJ ar v t 'I-oeV K . .-,w ow w u

(Continued fromPage 1)
in the first draft were the teach-
ing of contraception and ve-
nereal disease."
According to Smith, there was
some "vagueness" as to who
would teach these topics under
the terms of the first bill, but
the new measure specifically re-
quires instruction by persons
qualified in health education.
THE 'COMPROMISE d r a f t
would also grant local school

boards the option of determin-
ing their own courses, within
guidelines set by the state su-
perintendent of public instruc-
tion.
In addition, the bill deletes all
references to sexual deviance
and sexual relations contained
in the defeated bill. Opponents
claimed it would have allowed
instruction on homosexualityand
so-called sexual perversions.
Despite these changes, says
Smith, "neither bill has the

number of votes needed to pass.
We need 20 and, on the new bill,
we've only got 17 or 18.
"WE'VE GOT support from
several groups, including the
Department of Public Health
and the governor's office," he
said. "The only group that really
opposes it is the Happiness of
Womanhood, Inc. (HOW)."
"We're hoping for more sup-
port in upcoming weeks," con-
tinues Smith. "We're getting
help from Eastern Michigan
University, where sex ed classes
are taught."
Asked how constituent support
is running for the bill, Smith
replied, "It's pretty much ac-
cepted in Ann Arbor."
HE CITED a number of state

and national polls which show
the majority of the American
public, as well as Michigan res-
idents, in favor of teaching sex
information in high schools.
Smith expressed surprise over
the failure of some state sen-
ators to support Bursley's bill
while the public supports it.
He states, "We're one of the
few states that actually has per-
mitted sex education but pro-
hibited birth control informa-
tion. What we would now like
to do is strike that prohibition."
UNDER BOTH of Bursley's
proposals, classes on sexual in-
formation would be elective pro-
grams without penalties for stu-
dents who choose not to partici-

a L W JJU c1U oo rau
(Continued from Page 1) "But in my judgement we'd beI
guidelines were established, raising the most serious ques- i
but the law school has not com- tions . . . if we made appoint- 1
plied with them, according to ments merely to get persons of
Zena Zumeta, former Director one sex or race," said St. An- I
of the Affirmative Action Com toine. 1
mittee. ST. ANTOINE also added:
Zumeta claims the law school that there are very few open-E
has been able to disregard the ings for appointments in the
guidelines because the federal law school -- two or three max-
government has not enforced imum each year.
them. He added that minority appli-
"HEW IS not doing a damn cants have been interviewed,
thing," charged Zumeta. and two minority professorsa
"What the protesters don't offered visiting professorships
understand is that HEW doesn't for next term and the summer.
impose quotas, they merely Lamont Walton, a recent law
asked us to establish goals, and school graduate said, "There is
there's a difference," said law a need for more black and wo-
school Dean Theodore St. An- men professors in order to com-
toine. "We're sorry that we ply with the affirmative action
haven't been able to achieve guidelines. Promises have been
all our goals. made and broken by the law

(Continued from Page 1)
bered what he looked like.
By this time, others had fig-
ured out what had happened,
and the bank doors were being
locked. We were all told to re-
lax, and that the FBI would ar-
rive shortly to question us.
This was the first chance I
had to really think about the
robbery, and I was disappoint-
ed.

I

tioned by a tough, cold, calcul-
ating agent, dressed in a trench
coat. He would quickly flip open
his FBI identification and just
as quickly close it.
The questions would be asked
with a firm, steady voice. Ones
that I would be compelled to
answer. Maybe he'd even have
a portable spotlight. I couldn't
wait.
"HI THERE, I'm from the

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 45
Saturday, October 25, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i Iy Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann

Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann Ar-
bor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

Bank robbers were supposed FBIl,"he started. He handed
to brandish weapons, wear ny- me his identification, adding,
ion stockings over their heads, "It's not very exciting, not like
and order us to lie flat on the in the movies." He was dressed
floor and be very still. Frank- in a blue, striped suit and was
ly, this one was a bore. No one very jovial, nothing like I ex-
even knew about it until it was pected. Well, I'd impress him
over. with my description of the rob-
"OH WELL," I thought. May- ber, I thought.
be the FBI questioning would "He was about 5 feet, 8 inch-
be better.? es tall, with a reddish-brown
I was expecting to be ques- moustache and a pony-tail," I
gushed. "His hair was darker
than his beard, and he had on
Unaware a yellow hard-hat, and-"
"Take it easy," he said. "I
can't write that fast, and be-
sides, we have. pictures of him,
IT so just relax."
0n THAT DID IT. My spirit was
broken. I quietly continued the
" description then answered a
kfew more questions. The FBI
Mitenei man shook my hand, thanked
me and said they'd be in touch
(Continued from Page 1} if they needed me.
The Huston plan was rescind- As I left the bank I hollered
ed by Nixon in July, 1970, five back, "It was never like that
days after he first appnroved it. in the movies!"

-ADVERTISEMENT-

DiningOut in Ann Arbo
wyd A b eating
A weekly guide to great eating

school. A set of demands was
presented to the law school last
year, and these have not been
complied with."
THE PROTESTERS' major
complaint was that the law
school has only one black pro-
fessor, Harry Edwards.
Edwards,' however, is on offi-
cial leave for one year to teach
at HarvardtUniversity. "It is
doubtful that hie will come
back," Zumeta said.
WOMEN lecturers and speak-
ers have taught at law school
in the past, but there are cur-
rently no women professors at
the school, Zumeta said.
Of the seven professors hired
since 1973, six were white
males andthe seventha white
female, according to Aubray
Verdun, chairman of the BLSA.

Highlights from our
fine Greek menu:

FEATURING THIS WEEK:

PARTHENON GYROS
Jiesiluant

GYROS ........
SHISH-KA-BOB ..
MAUSAKA .....
PASTITSIO .....
DOLMADES .....
SPINACH PIE ....
GYROS PLATE ...
COMBINATION
PLATE .........

$1.45
1.40
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
2.25
3.65

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Sun. 12-12 midnight
football weekends (Fri.-Sat.)
11 -3A.M.
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HOURS: M-F 11-2 a.m.; .
Sat. & Sun. 5-2 a.m.
t<:7:5 t=-> <==<=>

I

Offering the city's only exclusively Greek menu,
the Parthenon Gyros Restaurant enters a second year
at its downtown location on Main St. and Liberty.
The cafeteria format allows patrons to pick up
their food and leave quickly, if they wish. But most
people, especially first-time customers, talk with the
friendly folks behind the counter and learn about the
authentic Greek foods on the menu.
The Gyros (pronounced Hyros) is the house spe-
cialty, and there is nothing like it this side of Chicago,
according to co-owner George Gavas. Modeled after
the traditional Middle-Eastern dish Shawarma, the
Gyros is a lean blend of specially selected beef and
lamb, lightly seasoned, and seared to seal the juices
and flavor inside.
One can walk past the 226 S. Main storefront any
day and see the Gyros slowly turning in the Auto-
doner, which gives it a special char-broiled flavor.
Every morning co-owners Louis and John chop
and prepare the Gyros blend with their own special
process and seasonings.
Very few of the first-time patrons have tried a
Gyros before. But after sampling the meat and learn-
ing about the dish, George says most try and enjoy it.
About 250 pounds of Gyros are consumed daily in the
restaurant.
Food, people and atmosphere make a restaurant
s unique kind of place, and George likes to tell stories

of out-of-towners who try Gyros and then go to all
lengths to have another one.
There is an airline pilot based in Washington,
D.C., who makes a special trip to the Parthenon
whenever his schedule affords him the time in Ann
Arbor. ie has a Gyros in the restaurant and then
buys a dozen to freeze and enjoy at home with his
wife.
A few months later he made a special trip with
his wife so she could try the Gyros fresh from the
Autodoner. They ordered a dozen Gyros to go, and,
with a few bottles of wine had a first-class party with
friends at a local hotel.
On innumerable occasions businessmen, conven-
tioneers and visiting professors have tried a Gyros
for lunch, driven home and then returned the same
night with family or friends so they could sample the
delicacy. This often entails driving over 100 miles in
one day so someone can enjoy the outstanding flavor
of the Gyros.
Every item on the menu is prepared in the res-
taurant kitchen-from the baklava and rice pudding
to the Mousaka and Dolmades (stuffed grape leaves).
Prices are very reasonable with the Gyros at
$1.45, Mousaka at $1.75, and Greek Salad for 90c.
Five stained glass murals depicting scenes from
Greece adorn two walls of the 172-seat dining area.
These were commissioned by the Gavas brothers from
artist Thia Kakis, a native of Greece who has since
returned to his homeland.

4

qp0

1W&_ t


9,

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BAR &

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Mon.-Sat.: 1 1:00 a.m.-2:00 a.m.; Sun.: 12 noon-2:00 a.m.
Kitchen Open until 1 a.m. Cocktails until 2 a.m.
208 W. HURON NEAR MAIN
ANN ARBOR 995-0505
DANCING FRIDAY isSATURDAY With
STRUTTERS' BALL
SMORGASBORD WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY
100 FOODS $4.95
DINNERS FROM $3.95 UP LUNCH $1.50 UP
SUNDAY BUFFET $2.95
0 COCKTAILS 0 WINES * BANQUETS
(~ d,0t Continental Dining
102 S. FIRST 663-2401

THE SPAGHETTI MACHINE
301 W. HURON 663-2403
SALAD BAR 13 TYPES OF SPAGHETTI
GREEN & WHOLE WHEAT NOODLES OYSTERS, CLAMS,
SHRIMP, SCALLOPS, LOBSTER, RAINBOW TROUT
VEAL, BEEF TOURNADOES OSOBUCO
COCKTAILS-WINE
AN UNUSUAL CONCEPT OF P U B L I C DINING
WHERE EVERYTHING HAPPENS IN FRONT OF
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AT EXTREMELY MODERATE PRICES
Heidelberg
215 N. MAIN ! 663-7758
DINING: Complete German a n d American
menu 11 a.m.-1 :30 a.m. Salads
DANCING: German Bands on Saturday nights
BANQUET FACILITIES
RATHSKELLER:.Folk music sing-along Fri. &
Sat. nights
(NO COVER)

Cottage INN
(The oldest pizzeria in Ann Arbor)

The Real
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