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September 03, 1964 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER :3,1364

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 2. 1984

+v+a v+r wa ,a vua ia-+ara +s. av y .ayyz

,

Seventy-Fifth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVEmrSIY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
Where Opinions Are Free 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH. NEws PHONE: 764-0552
-Truth Wil Prevail
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

CHARTS PRE-SCHOOL PROGRAMS:
Board Plans To Close Jones School, Bus Students

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, ,1964

NIGHT EDITOR: H. NEIL BERKSON

By LEONARD PRATT
A full summer's work came to
the first stage of completion last
Wednesday night when the Ann
Arbor Board of Education voted
unanimously to close down the
city's Jones High School next fall
because of its de facto. segrega-
tion.
Concern with Jones School's high
proportion of Negro students -.
the student body is presently 75
per cent :Negro-stretches back
two years to a study conducted
by a citizen's committee on ra-
cial conditions in "inner city"

Some of today's four-page edition of The Daily was produced using the facilities
of the Chelsea Standard after a power failure left the Student Publications Bldg.
without electricity. This unique edition, without the Daily's usual editorial page, was,
printed through the cooperation of Standard editor W. P. Leonard. The Ann Arbor
News also helped by providing The Daily with Associated Press copy.

WAR, MYSTERY, SEX:

Radiation Sparks Public's Fear

Interest

' elementary schools. This report,
which covered schools in Ann Ar-
bor's most heavily populated
areas, recommended closing of1
the school as soon as possible be-
cause of the racial imbalance
there.
The "inner city" report had lit-
tle effect other than to let the
school board know that there were
not only racial problems involved
at Jones School but also educa-
tional problems. The board's con-
cern for these problems led to
the creation of the citizen's com-
mittee that has issued the "Jones
School Report."
Two Points
At the very outset the board
emphasized two things about the
report which this committee would
issue:
1) It was not to be considered
a report on Jones School adone,
but rather a report on racial con-
ditions in all of the city's ele-
mentary schools.
2) The board was not concern-
ed with the racial situation alone,
but with the educational results
of this situation. As lie committee's
report puts it, its job was to re-
port on the racial situation "par-
ticularly as it may result in .
educational disadvantages arising
from or identifiable with such
segregation."
Issued early this summer, the
report disclosed several important
facts about this imbalance and its
results. First, although Negro
students are only six per cent of
the city's total, they accounted for
75 per cent of the students at
Jones School, 41 per cent at Mack
School and 28 per cent at Perry!

On an all-city chart, Negro stu-
dents were shown to read poorer3
as the degree of segregation of
their school increased.
In general academic perform-
ance, the report stated that 67 per
cent of Jones' and Mack students
averaged "C" grades. Yet of Ne-
gro children from the city's un-
segregated schools only 55 per cent
averaged "C" and of the city's
white children, only 31 per cent
averaged "C" grades.

'3
J

By CHRISTINE LINDER tion, this ambivalence is only
natural, Dr. Colin Mawson, a Ca-
Radiation is a subject of both nadian physicist, said recently.
interest and fear to a public Whiple c
which usually hears .only threeW p
things about it. Unfortunately, atomic radiation
-Radiation is caused by nuclear is also a misunderstoon subject,
weapon explosions, and thus is Prof. G. Hoyt Whipple, director of
intimately connected with war; the radiological health program
-Atomic radiation is a myster- in the public health school, be-
ious phenomenon which cannot lieves.
be perceived by any of the senses, An unjustified exaggeration of
and the dangers of fallout by some sci-
-Radiation can cause genetic entists and an, over-zealous en-
change or mutation, posing the forcement of safety regulations
threat of deformed babies. in the handling of radioactive ma-
thof defr, mernd bais terials are two results of this fear
With war, mystery;adsx and misunderstanding,sujcsithr┬░ow Whipple
provocative subjects in their own claims.
right-so closely related to radia- Atomi
Atomic radiation has been cited
as a health hazard because it can
change the structure of molecules
and atoms in the body so that they
cannot take part in normal chemi-
cal reactions which are part of
Sthelife processes. Changes pro-.
M A RKSM ENduced by radiation can be eitheri
somatic or genetic.
Somatic changes include burns,
destruction of tissue, or death if
* Welcome Students
S I G I G 1 and University Personnel
SING ING"" "''''''""'
FORALLU-MBARBERS
(near Kresge's)
OCCASIONS Now under New Management
"Our idea is workmanship and
service-Sanitation is the law!"
-Carmen Trepassio, Mgr.
665-8120 or
764-5635 NEW OWNER:
DOMENIC DASCOLA,
ofe Class of B36
of the Dascola Barbers

large amounts of radiation are re-
ceived over a short period of time.
Smaller amounts of radiation re-
ceived over an extended period
may cause cancer or shorten the
life span.
Genetic changes that may occur
as a result of radiation can alter
the material through which the
characteristics of one generation
are passed on to the next.
Whipple criticizes those scien-
tists who claim that radiation
from fallout is a great danger to
health by pointing out that ap-
proximately 70 per cent of all
radiation we receive comes from
natural sources such as the earth
and outer space, 22 per cent comes
from medical uses of radiation
such as x-rays and only 8 per
cent comes from fallout.
Medical Danger
"If we are really interested in
cutting down the amount of radia-
tion we receive, we should try to
reduce radiation exposure to pa-
tients during medical. diagnosis
and treatment, a thing, incident-
ally, that is being done quite ef-
fectively by the University Medical
Ceniter," Whipple says.
Another c r i t i ci s.m Whipple
makes is of the way in which
safety standards for the use of
radioactive materials are some-

times enforced by inspect
the Atomic. Energy Con
"Too often, the enforce
these standards is left to
not scientists, who have l
derstanding of the prot
radiological health and a
ested in following only t
of the law," Whipple sa
tioning the real effectiv
such an enforcement pr(
Workers Safe
Noting that the danger
diation to people who w
it commercially or med
quite small, Whipple poi
that such people are in m
danger when they get in a
they are at work.
"Moreover, studies of ra
ity in the areas sur
plants where nuclear p
actors are used have fail(
tect any increase in radio
"In spite of the saf
atomic power reactors, p
ing them have frequent
constant harrassment bot
United States and abro
Enrico Fermi Atomic Pov
in Monroe, Michigan, for
which is just starting to
had to spend several yea
gal battles before the
States supreme court g
mission for it to be cons

ors from
rmission.
ement of
lawyers,
little un-
blems of
re inter-
he letter
id, ques-
eness of
ocedure.
from ra-
ork with
ically is
nted out
uch more
car than
dioactiv-

Students Favo
In YD-YR Pol
A majority of polled students
favored the Democratic Party in a
recent political survey taken by
the University Young Democrats
and the Young Republicans. It was
the first time the Democrats came
out on top in a University poll in
recent years.
The poll, opening election-year
programs for both organizations,
was taken during registration
where cards asking for name, ad-
dress, age and party preference
were distributed by club members.
Out of 10,00 cards distributed,
4300 were returned, YD chairman
Michael Grondin, '66, said. The
cards revealed 2550 students fav-
ored a Democrat for President
while 1330 indicated Republican.
Anti-Goldwater Republicans num-
bered 62. The poll also showed 150
independents and 99 who had no
preference in the national election.

These figures, plus figures show- 1) Jones School was not only to
ing that markedly fewer Negro be closed, but its students were
students than white students were to be bused out to other Ann
p a re er Arbor elementary schools to fur-
preparing for college, led the citi- ther integrate both Negro and
zen s committee to recommend to white students.
the school board that Jones School 2) It was recommended that kin-
be closed. dergarten students be left at Jones
Other Points School, because of the problems of
Along with this recommenda- busing such.young children to oth-
tion, the committee sent several er locations. The school board was
other suggestions to the school urged to "consider steps for ar-
board: resting the educational imbalance
at the kindergarten level," how-
ever.
)r Uemn !cratS 3) But not only was imbalance
a concern at the kindergarten lev-
el. The committee recommended
-t ken H I l. that 'the school board organize a
STaken Here pogram "to assure the integra-
tion of these children into their
"Republicans have outpaced Demo- p-ograms in t h e i r receiving
crats by at least 2-1." schools.
"Students are intellectually op- 4) A program director was to
posed to Sen. Goldwater," Grondin be appointed to oversee the entire
said, explaining the results. program and to be responsible di-
Cairexplainin the rss Brectly to the school board.
Chairman of the YR's, Bergian These recommendations were es-
Gregian,'65L, said the decreased sentially what the school board
Republicanshowing was due to adopted last Wednesday. The mo-
misunderstanding on the part of ;tion made by Robert Bolt of the
students who usually prefer the Re-'- school board, provides for the clos-
publican party. He said the poll's ing of Jones School at the end
outcomeresulted from reaction to' of this year, for a pre-school pro-
press interpretation of Goldwater. gramUpraeunrrilgd
G * gramto prepare underprivileged
Gregian predicted that by Octo- students for transfer to other
ber campus preference will shift schools and for the appointment,
back to Republican. This will oc- "without delay," of a program co-
cur "when people listen to what ordinator to implement the board's
Goldwater actually says,' he said. policies.

q
*6

4

4

4

1i~
I NTERNA
M1)

I

rounding School.' Grondin noted the Democratic
ower re- Poor Reading Level preference was surprising because
ed to de- But what was more important,: in all recent campus mock elections
activity." whereas seven per cent of the
eness of Negro students at schools which
lants us- were not segregated were reading
;ly faced three years above their grade 1ev-
th in the el, no Negro students at Jones
)ad. The were reading this well. And where-C
wer plant as 20 per cent of the students at!
example, the less-segregated Mack School
operate, were reading from one and one- prof. Robert W. Parry of the
rs in le- half to three years above their Prof.tRobertmW.tParyofth
United grade level, only 17 per cent f chemistry department was award-
ave per- Jones' students were doing this ed the first $1000 American Chem-
tructed. well. ical Society Award for Distin-
~truced. ell.guished Service in the. Advance-
ment of Inorganic Chemistry in
Chicago recently.
Parry is an authority on the
kchemistry of compounds made up
dof boron and hydrogen. Boron
V U tIin S fuelsareconsderedimportant
a major new rocket propellant.

E
I

kTIONAL
(ER

SEPT. 5th

8:30 P.M.

ii

UNION BALLROOM

REFRESHMENTS

FREE!

DANCING

OPEN IN 1968?
College Awaits T
Now holding fourth and fifth utilizing the summer m
place in the University's tentative gather background data
list of building priorities are the vations in buildings, cu
two buildings the new residential and instructional techniq
college needs to get started. I Come fall, these plann
The two buildings, an academic faculty group headed by
classroom structure and a science Dean Burton Thuma of
building, may be moved to differ- material to set the spec

School,
Time
is
OLYMPIA
TIME

DIAL 662-6264 ent levels of priority before the
- -,-----Regents send the 1965-66 con-
struction funds request to Lans-
ing. But the residential college's
planners hope their buildings-to-
STARTS THURSDAY -be will be high enough on the list
S A Extended Ru-Move Over of that they'll be ready for use by
4D $PERFO ENING E This Great Crowd Pleaser! the fall of 1968-the target date'
DAY PERFORMANCES AT Tfor opening the new literary col-
1:00-3:45-6:30 & 9:15 lege division.
ALL TICKETS $1.00 Small College
This is a The residential college will be
s a hra small, liberal-arts college locat-
U " ca/ibre ed between Central Campus and
comedyl North Campus. In it, its founders
gFhope to combine the intimacy of
a small college with the diversity
available from the large Univer-
- sity campus nearby. And by im-
plementing new ideas in educa-
tion, they hope to raise under-
- graduates' intellectual ambitions.
While aating for their build-
PETERh tn
ing, the college's planners are
. . SELLERS
..DAILY OFFICIAL
EK-BULLETIN
nt oS The approval of the following
student-sponsored events becomes
- en hIlanros "effective 24 hours after the pub-
O"ER SNRlication of this notice. All pub-
aC on-* ked film!licity for these events must be
withheld untilvthe approval has
s become effective.
Approval request forms for stu-
S T dent sponsored events are avail-
able in Room 1011: of the Stu-
dent Activities Bldg.
U. of M. Physical Therapy Club'
Mass meeting, Sept. 3, 7:30 p.m.,
University Hospital.
6 Brand New Songs India Students Association, In-
plus your Beatles favorites! I dian Movie, Sept. 5, 7:30 p.m.,
SOON: Alfred Hitchock's COLOR bDeLUXE " Angell Hall, Aud. A.
"MARN IE" UhIYULA Homecoming '64, Mass meeting,
Sept. 12, 7:30 p.m., Angell Hall,
Aud. A.
WANTED
PEOPLE TO PLAN THE TRA
Uof M WORLD'S FAIR
Contact Int. Affairs Com. - Union Student Offices i41 I

for the 1200-student
tained college.
Precisely what and w
final clump of buildingE
remains uncertain, since
dential college, of this
unique in American ed
Thuma observes. Two
of the faculty planning

onths to,
on inno-
irriculum
ues.
iers -- a
Associate
the lit-I
ifications
self-con-
here the
s will be
"a resi-
type I
lucation,"
members
commit-'

ually flee the current residence TODAY
hall system for apartments or 7:30 p.m.-Eveln Szell, Socialist
Greek life. Those who stay do not Workers Party candidate for the
interact effectively with the United States Senate, will discus,
the 1964 platform of her party in
freshmen, he says.-_ the Multipurpose Rm. of the UG-
-Clustered around the resi- Li. Her talk will be sponsored
dence halls will be the academic by the Ann Arbor chapter of the
buildings. These structures should Young Friends of the Socialist
be conducive to innovation in Workers Party.
learning and teaching, particular-
ly facilitating independent study,
according to Prof. Stanford Erick-
sen, director of the Center for
Research on Learning and Teach-
--Once educational ideas are
sufficiently concrete, the planners
will be prepared to create the LydiaMendelss
"bricks and mortar" plans for
their product. Already John Mc-
Kevitt, assistant to the vice-pres-
ident for business and finance,
has begun "site-planning" with
an architectural firm.

University Tygewri ter Ceter
613 E. William St. 665-3763

4
I
I

0eiw*o

tee for the college, Prof. Theo-
dore Newcombe of the sociology
department and Prof. Alan Gay-
lord of the English department,
will bring back first-hand ac-
counts of similar experiments on!
the west coast.o
R~ecisions4
Beyond that, here's the latest
on what the planners know and
must decide:
-The 1200 students will live in
a complex of dormitories housing
from 450-200 residents apiece.
These residence halls will offer
a choice of living units varying
from suites to apartments for
married couples, Thuma explains.
Herbert Sigman, secretary of
the faculty planners, noted their
concern "with how to make dorm-
itory living appealing for upper- I
classmen." He elaborates that the!l
majority of upperclassmen us- I

JAZZ BAND
OPEN AUDITIONS
TON IGHT
10 p.m. SAB. . .5280

Youth Committee for DeBerry and Show
announces an
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
Hear EVELYN SELL: Socialist Workers Party
candidate for U.S. Senator speak on
"THE DIRTY WAR IN VIETNAM"
Hear Socialist Views
Thursday, Sept. 3rd, 7:30 p.m.
Multipurpose Room, Undergraduate Library

U

I

DO YOU LIKE
DITIONAL
K MUSIC9
serve and propagate FOLK,

1

II

I Shows at -
1, 3, 5,

rttlr MICHIGAN I

DIAL

I

Help pres

AAA-AAen

Ii

I

11

A Lil.Llvrrl r tlty W 11' 1 x SSA 1 1 LL' Vr -Inrj bs Azb

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