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September 03, 1964 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-03

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i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Squeaks

by

Faye

. In i .rirr.r ri i nan i r rl rr. .rrrwr+

-For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 764-055
from 1:00 to 2:30 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 9:30 'til 11:30 A.M

Votes

In

Primary

Eseb Faces
Coudron in
Fall Election
By JULIE FITZGERALD
Final totals in Tuesday's state,
primary pit Republican Marvin L.
Esch against Democrat Albert J.
Ccudron for the 53rd District state
House seat.
Esch carried 20 of 25 city pre-
cincts and both Ann Arbor town-;
shsip precincts to defeat John W.
Rae and Carolyn D. Lewis. He re-
ceived 4,575 votes to 3,122 for Rae
and 2,926 for Mrs. Lewis.
For the Democratic nomination,
Coudron cornered more than 50 per
cent of the vote to swamp oppo-
nent Russell J. Vial.
Coudron carried/ margins in 26
of the district's 27 precincts, losing
only the city's third ward, first'
precinct. He received 1,748 votes
to 728 for Vial.
State Senate
In the Democratic race for State
Senate, William; F. Dannemiller
beat Elwyn R. Fatchett by a three-
to-one m a r g i n in Washtenaw
County. Vote totals show 4,827 for
Dannemiller and 1,894 for Fatchett.
Unopposed Republican candidate
Gilbert Bursley shattered ;local
district records for votes in a state
senatorial primary, receiving 17,-
835 votes in the 18th District.
Republican Stanley G. Thayer
set the previous record of 8,805,
votes when he ran unopposed in
the 1962 primary.
Petersen
Incumbent George A. Petersen
rolled over his opponent George L."
Stauch in the contest for Sheriff
in the only primary contest for
county offices.
The total county vote was 12,213
for Petersen and 7,247 for Stauch.
Petersen starts his fourth straight
term., In the 1962 Primary, Stauch
lost the nomination to Petersen by
about 3,000 votes.
Total votes in Ann Arborsnum-
bered 14,064 which is over 50 per
cent of all the registered voters.
This is a record high since the 1952
primary when 54 per cent of the
registered voters cast their ballots.
Johnson To Give
Labor Day Speech
WASHINGTON (R') -President
Lyndon B. Johnson will formally
launch his presidential campaign
with a speech in Detroit's Cadillac
Square on Labor Day, next Mon-
day, the White House announced
yesterday.
This was regarded as a fore-
gone conclusion, but the White
House withheld the announce-
ment.
Mrs. Johnson will accompany
her husband to Detroit.

P rimar Elecion Results
Appear Inconclusive
By JACK BELL
Associated Press News Analyst
WASHINGTON-The extent of the white backlash and its pos-
sible effect on the presidential election results remained a mystery
yesterday on the basis of conflicting results of the Michigan primary.
Senate Republican Leader Everett M. Dirksen of Illinois and
Sen. Clinton P. Anderson (D-NM) said in separate interviews they

GOV. GEORGE ROMNEY

LBJ Snigns
Housing Bill,
WASHINGTON W)- President
Lyndon B. Johnson signed a bil-
lion-dollar-plus h o m e program
yesterday that 'will reach slum
apartments, farm and suburban
homes, loans to the elderly and
neighborhood remodeling.
It will, the President said, help
people rehabilitate their homes
and neighborhoods rather than
move "from the path of bull-
dozers."
The bill is a compromise -
nearly $700 million less than
Johnson wanted. But he said the
$1.1 billion measure would bene-
fit all of America.
Missing
Missing from the bill were the
administration's proposals for aid
in building satellite communities
in metropolitan areas, trimmed
from the original $1.8 billion re-
quest.
The new housing bill provides
these items:
--$725 million for urban re-
newal and authorization for 37,500
new public housing units.
-Boosts from $25,000 to $30,000
the Federal Housing Administra-
tion's mortgage payment insur-
ance limit on one-family homes.
Rehabilitation
--Provides $50 million to induce
property owners to rehabilitate
slum properties, to avoid more
expensive federal slum renewal
projects.
It will authorize loans to own-
ers and tenants of property in
urban renewal areas that can ex-
tend to 20 years at only three per
cent interest. The loans are lim-
ited to $10,000 for a home and
$50,000 for nonresidential property.
-Provides $150 million for di-
rect farm housing loans,,$75 mil-
lion for direct home loans to the
elderly, $50 million to rehabilitate
slums, $25 million to help in pur-
chasing park land and open space
recreational areas.
Loans
-Savings and loan associations
are authorized to lend money
within a 100-mile radius of their,
main office, rather than the old
50-mile limit.
-National banks may now
make real estate loans for up to
80 per cent of a property's value
for 25 years, rather than the 75
per cent, 20-year limit previously
set.
Among the liberalizations in the
new act are adjustments in the
home improvement program as it
applies to properties outside of
urban renewal areas. The object
is to make it more attractive to
lenders.
The new act also gives the FHA
the power to correct defects in
homes whose purchasers rely on
FHA construction standards and
inspections..

can draw no firm conclusions
from Tuesday's voting.
Both observed that the adoption
of a "homeowners' rights" ordi-
nance and the defeat of a con-
gressman who voted against the
civil rights bill indicated ambiva-
lence making the results confus-
ing.
Shattered
But Democratic National Chair-
man John Bailey said the Mich-
igan voting "has again presented
the nation with a clear picture of
what the so-called white blacklash
rally is: a myth that now lies in
shattered shambles."
Anderson said he regarded the
vote cast for Rep. Neil Staebler
(D-Mich), uopposed for the
Democratic nomination for gov-
ernor, as indicating the Demo-
crats will make a strong bid in
November to unseat GOP Gov.
George W. Romney.
Romney, a belated supporter of
GOP presidential nominee Sen.
Barry Goldwater (R-Ariz), roled
up a nearly 8-to-1 margin over
George Higgins, his primary op-
ponent.
On the Upswing
Dirksen noted with satisfaction
that the Republican total was sub-
stantially ahead of Staebler's vote.
He said that this might mean a
Republican trend in Michigan in
November.
The "homeowners' rights" ordi-
nance was interpreted as indicat-
ing a form of backlash against the
open housing advocated by civil
rights supporters but not included
in the new civil rights law. The
ordinance prohibits interference
with a person's right to sell or
rent his property in accord with
his own reasons.
Contrary to this trend, Rep.
John Dingell defeated Rep. John
Lesinski, only Northern Democrat
who voted against the civil rights
bill, in a reapportioned congres-
sional district made up largely
of Lesinski's old district.
But It Didn't
The new district is heavily pop-
ulated by voters of Polisn extrac-
tion and lies in a mostly suburban
area where if any backlash exist-
ed it presumably would have bene-
fitted Lesinski.
Bailey's statement linked Din-
gell's victory with earlier successes
by Rep. Ross Bass in gaining the
Senate Democratic nomination in
Tennessee and Rep. Richard Bol-
ling in winning Democratic re-
nomination in Missouri. These,
the party chairman said, "have
forcefully proven that when the
American people have the oppor-
tunity to choose between fear and
hope, they will always choose
hope."
Teach Reactionaries
Dingell's victory 'is a lesson to
the reactionary forces at work in
the nation that the people of'
Michigan'sd16th Congressional
District, and all the American
people, bitterly resent attempts
to turn neighbor against neigh-
bor," Bailey said.
.President Lyndon B. Johnson
has been saying that 10-15vper
cent of normal Democratic votes
may be lost to the presidential
ticket in November because of the
white backlash.
But he has contended that what
he calls the "frontlash" against
Goldwater's conservative policies
and statements may cost the Re-
publican nominee 30 per cent of
his party's votes in the general
election.
Summit
Romney, who won renomination
handily, withheld support for
Goldwater until after the Aug. 12
Republican "summit conference"
in Hershey, Pa. But he ordered
that state organization to get be-
hind the ticket of Goldwater and
Rep. William E. Miller of New
York, the GOP vice-presidential
nominee.
If there was any "frontlash"
against Romney for this action, it
did not seem to have affected his

vote total appreciably.

Will Battle
Incumbent
In Fall Vote
Meader Victory Seen
As Conservative Win
Incumbent Republican R e p.
George Meader (R-Mich) will face
Weston Vivian for the second dis-
trict congressional seat in the No-
vember election.
Meader, a 14-year veteran in
Congress, defeated Sen. Stanley
Thayer (R-Ann Arbor) in Tues-
day's Republican primary while
Vivian edged his Democratic rival,
Gerald Faye, by only 62 votes.
Final unofficial vote totals show-
ed Meader with 21,816 votes as
opposed to Thayer's 16,339 while
Vivian's 8,668 topped Faye's 8,-
606.
The Meader-Thayer fight had
been called a struggle between the
conservative and moderate wings
of the GOP. Meader, given a rat-
ing of 92 out of a possible 100 for
conservatism by a national con-
servative organization, had gained
publicity in recent months by vot-
ing against the civil rights bill.
Moderate
Thayer had served as state Sen-
ate majority leader and had been
closely identified with the "mod-
erate" faction of the party led by
Gov. George Romney.
While Thayer carried Washte-
naw County, Meader rolled up im-
I pressive margins in outlying Liv-
ingston, Lenawee and Monroe
counties to overcome his rival's
lead. "We had expected to do bet
ter in Ann Arbor," Meader com-
mented, "but a lot of Democrats
probably crossed over to vote for
my opponent."
Both Vivian and Faye were re-
luctant to claim victory or con-,
cede defeatbuntil final official re-
turns have been tabulated.
Awaits Canvass
Faye said he waswaiting for a
canvass of votes from Monroe
County before making any final
statement. He noted he had won
the other counties in the district
and was "concerned" about some_
of the returns from Monroe.
Vivian declined to comment on
the situation until the final count3
was in. However, it was hinted
tha the may contest some of the
results in other counties.
The primary battle was describ-
ed by one observer as an organi-
iational struggle, with Faye rep-
resenting the "wing" of the party
ed by former Gov. John B. Swain-
son and Vivian the more ideologi-
cal wing led by gubernatorial can-
-idate Rep. Neil Staebler.
State's Races
Produce Few
ig Surprises
Primary races for statewide
offices drew large amounts of
voter attention but failed to pro-
duce any major surprises.
Gov. George Romney, as ex-
pected, swamped Ferndale auto
dealer George Higgins, rolling up
over 550,000 to 92,000 for his con-
servative rival.
In the battle for the GOP sena-
torial nomination, Mrs. Elly Pet-
erson of outstate Charlotte de-
feated fellow Republicans James
O'Neil and Edward Meany. Mrs.
Peterson, with the unofficial sup-
port of the state GOP organiza-
tion, polled 220.000 votes, 40,000
more than O'Neil and 70,000 more
than Meany.

In Wayne County's 16th Dis-
trict, the "white backlash" theory
got an early test as incumbent
Democratic Rep. John Dingell
faced fellow incumbent John Le-
sinski, the only northern Demo-
crat to vote against the civil rights
bill.
Lesinski carried Dearborn by
2000 votes but Dingell garnered
enough votes in predominantly
Negro areas of Detroit to offset
the margin and win by 5000 votes.
However, in Detroit, a "home-
owners' rights" ordinance opposed
by leaders of both parties and
numerous church groups and
branded by one judge as "advanc-
ing the cause of racial bigotry"
nevertheless won approval from
the voters.
However, a court fight lies
ahead for the measure, as some-
including a circuit court - have
called the ordinance unconstitu-
tional.

MISCELLANEOUS
UNPAINTED
FURNITURE
Be your own decorator! Chests, book-
cases, desks, bars, and many other
items ready for your brush. Bargain
prices!! Michigan Woodcraft Co. 113,
S. Fourth. NO 2-2773. MI
New semester
New apartment
'New Food
For you at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
open every night til 12.
M-2
TRANSPORTATION
ECON-O-CAR
RENT A COMPACT CAR
$99
per 12 hr. period plus
pennies per mile
ECON-O-CAR
of ANN ARBOR

3-SPEED HI-FI, modern walnut floor GARAGES with doors that may
model. 665-5363. B6 locked. 723 Packard, near State.

438
400

W. Huron
Maynard

663-2033
663-2019

Evening phone 662-7417
after 6 p.m.
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
MOTOR SCOOTER for sale. 663-6304. Z3
CUSHMAN Eagle 1960-Stored last 2112
years. Good cond. 665-6542. Z4
BSA 250cc, blue - tan, 2900 mi., excel.
cond., 65 MPG. $535. Call NO 5-8679.
Z-1
1964 YAMAHA, 800 actual miles. 5
speed. 665-4336 after 5:30. Z5
YOU MEET THE NICEST PEOPLE on
a HONDA! Join the fun at HONDA
of Ann Arbor. 1906 Packard Rd. 665-
9281. Z-2
'57 VESPA, 125 cc. Call Charles at 764-
2889.
SEE IT NOW - the '64; Yamaha with
the revolutionary new oil injection
system. No more fuss or muss.
NICHOLSON MOTOR SALES
224 S. First
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
AUTO MAINTENANCE and accessories?
Advertise through the Daily Classi-
fieds. S

MOVE ONE WAY IN THE U.S.A.
Move Truck Rental System
202 W. washington St.
Call 665-6875
ROOM AND BOARD

s1a

19" WESTINGHOUSE TV, complete
with swivel stand. $50. Call 665-3368.
B-2
EVERYTHING for Baby-Clothes, fur-
niture. Excel. cond. 665-3106. B7
DOOR DESK FOR SALE-Highest bid-
der. Call 668-7176. B-10
PORTABLE Smith-Corona, $40; stereo
earphones, $15; Dial 764-0130 after 7
p.m. B-9
FOR SALE - Top Carrier, 4'x8' Pol
Table, Wizor Motor--% h.p., 22" wide
Rototiller and 63 Chevrolet Convert.
Call NO 3-0338.
QUARTERS of beef, one side-45e/b.,
front quarter-41c/lb., hind quarter-
57/lb. Lockers available. Dexter
Food Lockers, 8063 Main Dexter,
Michigan. B-11
BUSINESS SERVICES
WE SERVICE BUSINESSES WITH
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING. J
BABYSITTER wanted full-time to care
for well-behaved school children.
Must have car. NO 3-4747. J-3
PROFESSIONAL ART DESIGN, illus-
tration or drafting. Call 665-4075. J-2
PIANO INSTRUCTION
Daniela Weinberg
Formerly Instrutor at City College,
N.Y. Now accepting a limited num-
ber of beginning and advanced stu-
dents. 662-2821. J-1
WANTED TO RENT
WHAT DO YOU WANT to rent? Adver-
tise in the Daily Classifieds L
2 MALE undergrads need third to share
modern apartment. Call 665-0104. L-2
3 GIRLS need roomate. Attractive apt.
only $39. 924 Oakland. 665-6947. L-3
MAN TO SHARE large apt. Shouldn't
be too clean. Inquire at 410 Ben-
jamin. L-4
FEMALE ROOMATE TO SHARE APT.
with 2 girls. Own room. $45/Mo. plus
elec. 1 blk. from campus. 662-7988.
L-5
USED CARS
RENAULT - 1958, 30,000 miles. $150.
668-6310. N7
USED CARS: Can be sold easily and
quickly through the Daily Classifieds.
Try. N
VW - 1960. One owner. Exceptionally
good cond. Best offer. Call 764-6486
before 5. N
VW KARMANN GRIA coupe 1960 -
Good cond. Good taste - Good econ-
omy. Call 663-2635 after 5:30. N-I
1959 RENAULT DAUPHINE only 38,000
miles. Good cond. Reasonably priced.
Call 662-1725. N13
'56 THUNDERBIRD, good cond. Call
NO 2-9061 days or NO- 3-9811 after
4:30. N-4
'59 MG. TONEAU radio, wire wheels,
low mileage. Call NO 2-0854. N-5
VW 1963 sedan. Clean, in good cond.
R /H, W/W. $1400 or first good offer.
27777 Joy Rd. Garden City -,ust 15
mi. east of AA. Call 4272082 after
Sunday. N-6
1961 FIAT, Spyder red disc brakes,
wooden steering wheel, original own-
er. Call 663-6284 after 6 p.m. N-11
1959 RENAULT DAUPHINE. Good Cond.
Must be sold before Thurs. Cheap.
663-5435. N-10
1959 STUDEBAKER LARK, 6-cyl., 2-dr.,
overdrive, radio, heater. Almost new
tires, excel. mechanical cond. 764-
2372, or 665-8321 eves. N-9
PHOTO SUPPLIES
OUR PICTURE cannot appear in the
Daily Classifieds - but your ad can.
D

C9

NEW CARS
IS YOUR OLD CAR finally falling
apart? Find a new one through the
Michigan, Daily Classifieds. V
FOR SALE
READY TO PAINT - Desks, chests,
bookcases, chairs. Lowest prices.
MICHIGAN WOODCRAFT, 113 S.
Fourth Ave. B3
FOR SALE: Nothing unless you ad-
vertise in the Daily Classifieds. Re-
sults guaranteed. B
HI-FI Equipment for sale, Call 662-
7220. B4
1950 PONTIAC. Body poor, rest good,
good tires, battery. Stick shift. $65.
Call 665-6361, after 5. B-1
FOR SALE-Gas range, $22. Also VW
luggage rack, and used trumpet. Call
662-6250. B5

World News
SR oundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- The space
agency yesterday dropped a 1966
space probe to Mars and two
.survey flights to the moon to live
within its trimmed budget.
The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration stretched out
time periods between space launch-
es and also ruled out any further
procurement orders this fiscal
year for observatory space craft.
The space' agency clung firmly,
however, to its determination to
land men on the moon in this dec-
ade.
TOKYO-The Japanese govern-
ment announced yesterday it would
deny permission to United States
nuclear powered submarines to vis-
it Japan if they are equipped with
a submarine killing rocket with a,
nuclear warhead.
* * *
UNITED NATIONS-Secretary-
General U Thant said yesterday
he plans to withdraw the UN ob-
servation mission from Yemen to-
morrow.
Thant said the mission had made
only limited progress in its ef-
forts to carry out a disengage-
ment agreement under which for-
eign intervention in the Yemen
+ civil war would have been ended.

FOR RENT
3RD ROOMMATE WANTED - Luxury
apt. near campus. $65/mo., utilities
incl. 731 Packard, Apt. 206A. C7
FOR RENT: space in the Daily Classi-
fied section - Fall sublet - 9 month
lease - cheap! C'
MODERN 2-BDRM. APT. with separate
study. 2 blocks from campus. Im-
mediate occupancy. Call eves. 453-
3287." C6
TRANSPORTATION to and from the.
Daily is cheap - so is a classified ad.
C
PERSON WANTED to share a house at
954 Greenwood with 3 male grad stu-
dents. Total cost: $60-$65/mpo. Call
665-2746 at 5:30-7:30, p.m. or 764-4430
and ask for Bob Thalmann or John
Scott. C8
4 PERSON APT. Furn. 1315 S. State.
668492 afternoons. 0-2

be'
C-3

LOTS OF ROOM in the Daily Classi-
fieds for your ad. E
BABY-SITTER - Room & Board in ex-
change for babysitting afternoons
and some evenings. If live out, will
pay salary. Call 665-8277. E-2
HUNGRY? Board at AXE! Five eve-
ning meals, one Sun. Option of 5
lunches. $7.80 & $10.80/wk. 1319
Cambridge. NO 278312. E-3
RM. & BD. at fraternity house. Call
Joe Nelson at 663-1841. E-5
BARGAIN CORNER
SAM'S STORE
Has Genuine LEVI's Galore!
"WHITE LEVI'S"
SLIM-FITS
$4.49
For "Guys and Gals"
"White," cactus, light blue,
black, brown, loden
S-T-R-E-T-C-H LEVI's
For Gals and Guys
"White" and Colors
$6.98
LEVI'SJACKETS
Blue Denim-$5.49
"White"-$5.98
LEVI's Dungarees-$4.49
LEVI's Superslim's-$4.98
Open Mon. &£Fri. Nites
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington

MODERN, 3 bedrm apt. Immediate oc-
cu fancy. Huge mohogany panelled
living room with balcony, master
size bedrms. Double bath with vanity.
Designed for "5 or 6 persons.- Open
Saturday. 1000 Oakland. C-5
PARKING space for VW or compact.
Packard at Division. 665-8368 after 8,
p.m. S-1
PARKING SPACES
$20/semester. 1 blk from Law Quad.
NO 3-7268. C-1I
APT. for 3 male students. Modern
kitchen, study rm, and large bedrm.
Plenty of closet space. Call 662-3036.
C-1'
1 MAN NEEDS 1 MAN. Large, furn.
apt. near campus. $60/mo. NO 3-7478.
C-12
2 MALE UNDERGRADS need 3rd to
share modern apt. Call 665-0104. C13
HELP WANTED
OUR READERS can help us (wonder of
wonders) advertise' in the Daily
Classifieds. H
WANTED-House Director for Nelson
Int. ~House for grad women. Single
woman or couple may apply to' Bald-
win at SAB. 764-7442. H6
BABY SITTER 9 to 12 a.m. Mon. thru
Fri. 2 yr. old boy. Call NO 2-9301. H-1
BROADCAST ENGINEERS part time
First phone license required. Call
663-6565. H-2
PART-TIME RADIO repairman needed.
665-5788. H7
LIVE-IN GIRL STUDENT to work 20
hours for room and board. 3 children.
Extra pay for additional baby sitting.
Very close to campus. Call 665-4537.
H8
NEED A MEAL JOB for lunch and
dinner? Call NO 2-6674. H-9
A NEW DIVISION of Reader's Digest
Sales & Services is seeking several
students to work eves. & Sat. Highest
earnings possible. Contact Mr.
Naughton at 668-6808. H-10
PORTERING SERVICE needed at Tri-
angle Fraternity. Call House Man-
ager, 662-9431. H-11
ALTERATIONS.
HELP!
CHANGES easily made when advertised
thru the Daily Classifleds. 's P
PERSONAL f
FREE DINNER-Only cute coed cooks
need apply. Call 665-5884. F14
LOST-Small gold lighter. High senti-
mental value. Reward. Call 761-0457.
F19
MICHIGAN'S N ot-So-Little "Little
Magazine" needs" you and your ener-
gies. Join Generation and learn to 1)
fight rubber cement 2) fight frus-
trated artists 3) fight deadlines. We
need ordinary run-of-the-mill gen-
iuses. F-27
SS, (LL), MM, Sept. 2nd. F-24
DON'T MISS, THE FOUR FRESHMEN
in concert at Hill Auditorium on Sat-
urday, Sept.,12. Block sedts available
this Thursday and Friday, 10-4 at Hill
Aud. Box Office. General 'admission
seats on sale Tues.-Fri., 10-4 and all
day Saturday. Prices: 2.00, 1.50, 1.00.
F-4
WHAT A STEAL! '57 Cushman Eagle
scooter for sale. A-1 mechanically.
Call Fred right away at 663-7929. 917
Sylvan. F12

APTS. LIMITED

Apts. still available for
3 and 4 students.
$140-$210
Contact Apt. Ltd., 663-0511,
Eves. -665-9271.

THE VILLAGE APOTH
1112 So, Universi
Open 9 to 0

OLD & NEW Staff meeting
Generation offers the entire M
igan campus an opportunity to b
into the c4Iebrated "publishing n
et." I
8 P.M. - THURSDAY - 420 MAYN)
No previous experience required.
provide on-the-job training.
LLL, 00, 730
PUT MUSIC in your life, bells on
toes, records in your home, etc.,
through Michigan Daily Clasi
ads.
MISCELLANEOUS means anyt
Miscellaneous ads are needed to
the Classifieds a universal quali
MEAL JOB openings, fraternity.
761-2330 after 5 p.m.
League BaLLrOOm, 7:30 p.m.
JOIN THE MICHIGAN DAILY. Do i
day!! editorial staff trainee me'
at 4:15 today,r420Maynard Si
(Anil bring a friend.)
YOUTH COMMITTEE
for Deberry and Shaw announcesf
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
Hear EVELYN SELL: Socialist
Workers Party candidate for
Senator speak on. . .
"THE DIRTY WAR IN VIET NAM
Thursday. Sept. 3rd, 7:30 p.m.
Multipurpose Room,
Undergraduate Lib.
SOCCER PLAYERS-C'mon youg
Practice 2'00. Sunday at Wines F
You too, Warren.
EVER HEAR of Karsh of Ottawa?I
ton of the Pacific Coast? Zim
man of SI?_ Become a last nam
join the Daily photo staff.
Keson at 764-0553 afternoons.
long distance the Area 'Code is 3
REAL ESTATE
PROPERTY bought and sold thr
the Daily Classifieds!l
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS, AND BONGO
lental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
139 W. Washington -
BE SURE TO WATCH
Football; the World Series, and
Election Campaign on a NEJAC
set. RENT a 19 in. GE Portable
only $10.00 a month. Call NEJAC
Rentals. 662-5671.

AUSTIN DIAMOND -"Where r
prices buy quality diamondi
S. University. 663-7151.
SO WHO NEEDS THE PRETZE
ANYHOW? Generation dust
new staff members-people w
to learn the ins and outs,
downs of a little magazine.
Thursday, 8.p.m. in the Stude
lications Building, 420 Mayna
RIDES NEEDED for any week-en
September 15 on- to Phila
Pittsburg, br New Jersey ar
764-1805 after 5 - most urger
COMING Saturday, Sept. 19, 8
BOB DYLAN
Ann Arbor High. Tickets: mal
$3.75 and $2.75; balcony, $2:
$1.75. All seats reserved. Mai
only. Make check or money or
able to and mail to Ann Arb
and Jazz Society, 1103 S. Unt
Ann Arbor.
SOPH SHOW (FioreLLo) Mass N
Sept. 2nd.
Found: The Michigan Daily.
Classified Advertisers. Con
Your ads ;to the Daily Classifi
tion.
ZOOM!
That was a bike or scooter be
through the Miehigan Daily
fled ads.
YOU MUST establish credit so
later! Why not start with a
account at:
THE VILLAGE APOTHECA)
1112 So. University
Open 9 to 9
HI, SAILOR! I'm absolutely po
convinced thatyou're an ar
disguise. , . but disguised
angel !
DURING your stay in Apn Arb
your PRESCRIPTIONS on file

t to-
eting
treet.
P-15
an
F-28
guys.
Field.
F-25
Wes-
mer-
ner-
Call
For
313.
F-17
ough
R
the
TV
e for
C TV
x-1

- ,q - - .e- * i.VNI1
For your dining pleasures...
Our menu features:
ELEGANT SEAFOOD NEWBERGS
lobster, crabmeat, shrimp in our own
zesty sherry newberg sauce
ae
VEAL SCALLOPINE, MARSALA
sauteed veal in a rich marsala wine sauce
FRESH BROOK TROUT
from the Snake River, sauteed with a delicate dressing
J FILET OF RED SNAPPER
broiled to a turn and topped with a delicate
pinat Chardonnay wine sauce
BROILED LIVE MAINE LOBSTER
" U.S. PRIME STEAKS
4 PRIME RIBS OF BEEF
I
(44It40

DON"' SA Y
yocat find it

Rent a TV this Fall
f l NEW 19" G.E. PORTABLES
only $10.00 per month

Read
Daily
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