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February 18, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-18

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THURSDAY,, 18 FEBRUARY 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, 18 FEBRUARY 1985 THE MICHIGAN DAILY ?AW~ THREE

VIET NAM CRISIS:
Sino-Soviet Split May Widen

By The Associated Press
Soviet-Chinese relations seem
Just as cold as before the United
States retaliatory blows against
North Viet Nam. Perhaps the at-
mosphere is even colder. Indica-
tions are that the Chinese con-
sider they have won an important
round in their duel with the So-
viets.
A deep crisis threatening gen-
eral war could conceivably still
push the Soviet party closer to
Peking, at least temporarily. But
available evidence indicates the
Russians fell into a Chinese trap:
Peking was trying to interrupt a
trend toward better Soviet-Amer-
ican relations.

The Russians had responded
positively toward President Lyn-
don B. Johnson's suggestion of
an exchange of top-level visits.
This project now seems to be on
ice as a result of what happened
while Premier Alexei N. Kosygin
was in North Viet Nam.
The Soviet premier probably has
returned to Moscow empty-handed
and worried after his 11 days in
the Far East. His mission-with
stops in China and North Korea
-appeared to be related to a
prospective Moscow meeting March
1 of international Communist
leaders, called by the Russians
in attempt to muffle the Soviet-
Chinese dispute.

There is a reason to believe
the Chinese suspected Kosygil
was trying to get a Soviet foot
back in the Asian door. Peking
also seemed to suspect Kosygin
of trying to de-fuse the Viet Nam
situation.
Significantly, however, while
Kosygin was away, European sat-
ellite parties chorused proposals
for an international conference to
ease the dangers in Southeast
Asia.
Kosygin's arrival in Hanoi co-
incided with a sharp stepup in
Viet Cong terror attacks against
Americans in South Viet Nam.
These could have been calculat-
ed to bring U.S. reprisals. Since
Viet Cong orders are transmitted
through a front organization with
headquarters in Hanoi, and since
Chinese influence is strong in that
organization, it would not be sur-
prising if the Chinese hand was
behind the attacks. At any rate,
tension remained high all through
Kosygin's stay.

Ask-Concern
For Safety
Of Negroes
JACKSON (P)-Gov. Paul John-
son was asked yesterday to "take
particular interest" in the future
safety of Negroes who testify be-
fore the United States Civil Rights

Ranger 8 To Relay 4000
Moon Pictures to Scientists
CAPE KENNEDY -Spacecraft Ranger 8 streaked toward the
moon yesterday to snap more than 4000 pictures of a dusty, crater-
pitted plain which American astronauts may explore within five years.
The craft, launched from Cape Kennedy, skillfully executed
early maneuvers on a planned 65-hour, 234,300-mile lunar voyage
which could produce better photos than the set transmitted back last
July by Ranger 7. Ranger 8 cruised toward a midcourse point, where a
ground signal is to fire a small steering rocket aboard the craft to

I

'Designed
for student privacy
UflIVERSITY TOWERS
. Now renting for Aug. '65
S. UNIVERSITY AVE. & FOREST AVE. PHONE: 761-2680

Commission.
The request was made by the
com m ission president, John H an- Un h.rsd nIfM c i a't t
nah, president of Michigan State
University, who made a quick trip Uses Two ' U
to Johnson's office.

World Peace Conference
Opens with Humphrey Talk
NEW YORK YP)--Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey told a
world consultation on peace last night the United States will leave
"no mile untraveled" in pursuit of that goal.
He spoke as philosophers, scientists and statesmen from around
the world convened for a four-day summit "meeting of great minds"
on ways to maintain peace in the nuclear age.
Humphrey's unusual audience, from every continent of the
world, has as its.objective to seek workable solutions to "questions

Students Fast
For Settlement
In Viet War
Collegiate Press Service
Seven George Washington Uni-
versity students last Friday be-
gan a fast for peace in Viet Nam.
Calling on students throughout
the country to take up the fast,
the seven vowed not to eat un-
til the fasting had spread to oth-
er campuses.
The students, members of the
Washington, D.C., school's Stu-
dents for Peaceful Alternatives,
appealed for "a cessation of hos-
tilities by all combatant parties
in Viet Nam. We appeal for ar-
bitration of the conflict by the
United Nations or some other ap-
propriate international agency,"
they said.
The students are continuing to
attend classes while they are fast-
ing. Other schools already partici-
pating in the fast include the Uni-
versity of Maryland, American
University, University of Califor-
nia at Berkeley and Stephens Col-
lege.
At the University of Maryand,
the 11 fasting students expected
to be replaced yesterday by stu-
dents at Johns Hopkins Univer-
sity and Goucher College.
In conjunction with the fast,
Maryland students organized a
picket of the White House over
the weekend. About 50 student
participated in the demonstra-
tion demanding an end to hostili-
ties in Viet Nam.
Support for the fast is plannec
to include "massive picketing at
the White House" this weekend
according to the organizers. Also
planned is a 24 hour vigil al
Lafayette Park, opposite the White
House.
Gambia Gains
Independence
BATHURST, Gambia (P)-Tin3
Gambia goes it alone as an in-
dependent nation today, and its
success depends on how well :i
gets along with a neighbor
French-speaking Senegal.
Gambia is 10 times as long a
it is wide and its 4000 squar
miles is about the size of Lo
Angeles. The population numbers
300,000.
It is surrounded by Senegalese
territory and almost splits its
much larger neighbor in half.
Communications between Dakar
the Senegalese capital, and Ziguin
cho , capital of Senegal's southern
province of Casamance, muus
cross Gambia by both land and
air.

they know must be answered if
the world is to have a chance of
survival, according to Chairman1
Robert M. Hutchins. -
Called the "International Con-
vocation on Pacem in Terris
(peace on earth)," the gathering
was sparked by the 1963 encycli-
cal of that title by the late Pope
John XXIII.
In the present turbulence in
Southeast Asia, Humphrey said,
this country's only aim "is peace;
and freedom for the people of
Viet Nam."
"We will resist aggression," he
said. "We will be faithful to a
friend. We seek no wider war. We
seek no domination."
Humphrey called for strength-
ening of the peacekeeping mili-
tary forces of the United Nations
and improvement of the world or-
ganization as a step toward world
stability.
This had been among the late
Pope's pleas. On another point
stressed by the encyclical--curb-
ing nuclear arms - Humphrey
said: "It is the intention of the
U.S. government to pursue every
reasonable avenue toward igree-
ment with the Soviet Union in
limiting the nuclear arms race."
A mixed host of intellectuals,
theologians, istorians, economists,
lawmakers, physicists and other
leaders of learning, from Asia,
Africa, Europe and the Americas,
were among those attending the
conference.

World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Senate
Post Office Committee unanimous-
ly approved yesterday the nomina-
tion of John A. Gronouski for a
new term as Postmaster General.
* * *
WASHINGTON-Because of lag-
ging enlistments, the Defense De-
partment yesterday nearly dou-
bled its monthly draft quota for
April. It asked the Selective Serv-
ice system to induct 13,700 men.
* * *
SANTIAGO, Chile - Chile re-
sumed diplomatic relations with
Hungary yesterday. It had broken
with Communist Bloc nations in
1947 after a dispute following Rus-
sian expulsion of a Chilean and
subsequent Chilean allegations of
Communist interference in domes-
tic affairs . * *
MIAMI OP)-Havana radio re-
ported yesterday that Cuba and
the Soviet Union have signed a
$640 million trade agreement for
1965. This compares with $616
million last year.
NEW YORK-Racial terrorist
cells in various American and Ca-
nadian cities reportedly were un-
der surveillance yesterday for pos-
sible links to the thwarted dyna-
mite plot against the Statue of
Liberty and two other national
shrines.
The FBI had no comment.

Hannah made the move after
hearing testimony from three Tal-
lahatchie, County Negroes about
beatings and alleged intimidation.
"I have asked the Governor to
take particular interest that when
these witnesses return to thuir
homes they will be fully protect-
ed," Hannah said. "I am oar*,icu-
larly concerned about the Wit-
nesses from Tallahatchie county."
Hannah said that he was heart-
ened by Johnson's statement to
the commission Tuesday that law
and order will be maintained and
that no racial violence will be
tolerated.
Aaron Henry, state president for
the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
said he doubted the sincerity of
the governor's statement and sim-
ilar statements by others.
"When you have a man's back
against the wall he'll 'say y-
thing," Henry said. 'Wait until
the Civil Rights Commission goes
back to Washington."
Henry told the commission the
government should insure Negro
voting rights in the South with
new federal laws backed by fed-
eral arms.
Henry said that federal voting
registrars should be ;istaded in
any area where Negroes are
blocked from casting ballots.
He also recommended outlawing
literacy tests as a prerequisite for
voting, claiming they were often
abused.

SInnovations

Two University experiments are
tied to the Saturn rocket launch-
ed Tuesday by the National
Aeronautics and Space Agency.
Both experiments are being car-
ried out by the space physics
laboratory. One is designed to
help NASA engineers study the
giant rocket's behavior, while the
other is a new method devised by
university electrical engineers to
measure high altitude winds, ac-
cording to George Carignan, of
the engineering school.
The Saturn carries an ioniza-
tion gauge to measure the "ram
pressure" of the atmosphere on
its nose as the rocket moves up
through the atmosphere.
The gauge collects air particles
and makes them electrically active
by means of a weak radioactive
source in the gauge. The particles
are then counted with an electri-
cally polarized detector.
The second experiment may
open a new and simpler way to
measure high altitude winds, these
winds are now measured by 'neans
of sodium vapor of grenade ex-
periments, Carignan explained.
Engineers arrayed nine micro-
phones in a mile-long, mile-wide
cross near the launch site. The
michophones detect the angle of
arrival of the thunderous noise
from Saturn's engines as it climbs.

jockey it onto a collision course
with the moon.
The midcourse maneuver, sched-
uled for about 4 a.m. today, is
capable of correcting for a moon-
miss error of up to 6200 miles on
either side of the target.
If there are no hitches, Ranger
8 will approach the moon Satur-
day morning. In a 13-minute, 40-
second period, six television cam-
eras will take pictures before the
payload crashes onto the moon at
5800 miles an hour.
The cameras are designed to.
take pictures from an altitude of
1,180 miles down to within 1000
feet of the surface and to trans-
mit them instantly to the earth.
Scientists hope to maneuver
Ranger 8 so it will photograph a
region near the moon's termina-
tor, or shadow line. The prime
target is' the sprawling Sea of
Tranquility-the east central por-
tion of the moon as viewed from
earth.

International Week
presents
DEAN ALVIN ROSEMAN
Associate Dean/Graduate School of Public
& International Affairs of Pittsburgh
and
Assistant Director General of UNESCO
Union Ballroom at 7:30
Sunday, February 21

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pp.
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SATURDAY NIGHT
SZO AND THE ISRAELI STUDENTS
INVITE YOU TO
A. PARTY ISRAELI
FEATURING: THE NAGILA DANCERS
SKITS 0 ISRAELI FOOD
DANCING FOR EVERYONE
COME AT 8:30 to HILLEL, 1429 Hill St.

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The(Paul /hqfth/8a//
Saturday, February 20, 1965
League Ballroom

VALUES IN AN EITHER/OR SOCIETY-
Rev. Daniel Burkg-Prof. Peter Fontana
Quest for Human Values
5:30.. . SPAGHETTI DINNER . ...45c
CANTERBURY HOUSE.. . 218 N. Division
February 18, 1965
Students of all faiths-or lack thereof-welcome

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