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April 21, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-21

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THEMICHIGANDAILY

esident

Requests

road

Tax

Revision

Changes Aid
Unemployed,
Businesses
Calls Program First
- In 'Thorough' Reform
WASHINGTON (') - President
John F. Kennedy asked Congress
yesterday for broad tax changes as
weapons against aging factories,
unemployment, tax cheaters, ex-
pense account living and the flow
of gold overseas.
He called his requests "a first
though urgent step" toward more
thorough tax reform next year..
That reform, the President said,
could mean a general income tax
cut for everyone.
Meanwhile, his 6,300-word spe-
cial mesage to Congress asked
these major changes:'
1) A special tax incentive for
business to expand and modernize.
2) Withholding of taxes on divi-
dends and interest.
3) Repeal of the special benefits
given stockholders.
4) Sharp limitation of expense
account deductions.
5) Ending special treatment for
- corporations that invest in com-
peting industrial nations.
Kennedy said his proposed
changes, when taken together,
would not cut government revenue.
He said that while his incentive to
modernize business would mean a
$1.7 billion loss, the other changes
would bring in at least $50 million
more than that.
The mesage immediately ran
into Republican criticism in Con-
gress. Rep. Bruce Alger of Texas,
called it "a declaration of war on:
American free enterprise."
Democrats like Rep. Thaddeus
M. Machrowicz of Michigan prais-
ed the message but said some of
the proposals would have diffi-
culty passing Congress.
The House Ways and Means
Committee will open hearings May
3 on the President's proposal.

Welch Cites
Communist
Penetration
By The Associated Press
SHREVEPORT-Robert Welch,
outspoken founder of the contro-
versial John Birch Society, Wed-
nesday charged the Communists
"have heavily influenced all ma-
jor decisions in our government
since 1941."
In a copyrighted speech, Welch's
one hour and 45 minute talk dealt
with what he called "the princi-
ple of reversals" being used by the
Communists.
This principle, he said, is at
work in the Protestant ministry
"because that is almost the last
place the ordinary American would
expect to find them."
This principle, he said, is at,
work in our Protestant'clergy,
"the largest single body of Com-
munists in America, because that
is the last place you'd expect to
find them."
The founder of the Birch society
accused the press of misquoting
him and petting "completely false
statements in my mouth."
He said he was recently mis-
quoted in Santa Barbara concern-
ing the society's stand on racial
segregation.
Meanwhile in Congress, Rep.
Edgar W. Hiestand (R-Calif), a
member of the society, introduced
a resolution in the House to cre-
ate a special subcommittee to in-
vestigate the society and "the
smear campaign against it."
He cited as evidence of the al-
leged smear the Army's action in
relieving Maj. Gen. Edwin A.
Walker, accused of distributing
society material.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- The House
yesterday passed President John
F. Kennedy's program for liberal-
izing social security provisions
399-14, and the Senate approved

the President's minimum wage bill
65-28.
Also the House-Senate dead-'
lock on the administration's $394.
million bill to revive depressed
areas was broken, and the Senate

ADMINISTRATION BILLS:
CongressActs, on Welfare

Im- Tl.a laew .t .sa r tiM

World News Roundup,

quickly passed the comprc
version.
The House rejected by
vote a proposed Republican
stitute social security measure
would have omitted one of
most controversial Kennedy
posals-optional early retire
for men, at lower pensions.
Extra Benefits

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- President
John F. Eennedy invited former
Vice-President Richard M. Nixon
to the White House yesterday to
bring him up to date on Cuba and
other problems. The session fol-
lowed a.-news conference at which
Nixon said Kennedy is widely
popular as a person but there is
"virtually no support for his pro-
gram" across the country.
, , ,*
HAMILTON, Bermuda--A Cu-
bana airliner enroute to Havana
from Czechoslovakia landed at a
United States Air Force base here
yesterday-despite a warning not
to -- and was . put under armed
guard.
* * *
GEARGETOWN, British Guiana
-A .dozen pro-Castro pickets ap-
peared outside the United States
consulate yesterday and promptly
were counter-picketed by demon-
strators bearing signs reading:
"God bless America."
* * *
ALEXANDRIA, Egypt-Eighty
thousand Alexandria University
students and teachers demonstrat-
ed yesterday against "imperialist
intervention" in Cuba and de-

manded that the island's inde-
pendence be respected.
UNITED NATIONS-The Unit-
ed States;said yesterday it wants
adjournment of the United Na-
tions General Assembly today-the
target date set for the resumed
session that began on March 7. A-
delegate expressed hope the As-
sembly could take up both the
Hungarian and Tibetan questions,
but made clear the United States
would not seek an Assembly exten-
sion to consider the matter.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The Senate
yesterday passed by voice vote
and sent to the White House a
bill designating Vice-President
Lyndon B. Johnson to replace the
President as chairman of the Na-
tional Aeronautics and Space
Council.
* * *
ELISABETHVILLE - The Ka-'
tanga government decided yester-
day to lift partly the economic
boycott imposed on the United
Nations more than two weeks ago.
Officials said the boycott would
continue to some extent in Ka-
mina, near the big UN base where
about 3,000 Indian troops are sta-
tioned. -
UN troops here were cut off
from essential food supplies 'by
the boycott.

The extra social security
fits provided by the bill, est
ed at $750 million for the
year of its operation, wou
financed by an increase of
one per cent of the social i
ity tax paid by employers and
playes. The bill goes to the
ate.
The minimum wage bill v
extend provisions of the a
hour law to 4 million more v
ers and increase the min
wage from the present $1 an
to $1.25,
The measure now goes to
ference with the House, whi
jected the Kennedy bill last r
and passed a narrower gauge
sion instead.
Different Story e
In the House, the story o
pressed areas may be diff
since the conference bill r
bles the original Senate bill
closer than it resembles the
inal House bill.
In conference, the House
in on the key point in disc
the methods of financing a
million loan program in the
The Senate provision, nov
cluded in the compromise
would finance' the loan
through advances from the 'j
ury.
The House had wanted
loans financed by regular

--AP Wirephoto
FREEDOM FIGHTERS-Miami has become the enlistment office for anti-Castro bubans wanting to
fight In the rebel invasion of the island nation. Here prospective fighters wait to enlist

MIAMI (")--Guerrilla invaders\
of Cuba appeared last night to
be digging in for a long hit-and-:
run war against the Captro gov-
ernment.
While the Cuban regime claim-
ed to have crushed the counter-
revolution, rebels in exile kefused
to admit defeat and insisted their
main objective was achieved.

c
FI

They said Monday's landing in
the Bahia de Cochinos was not
a full scalei invasion but only a
supply operation. They said it
succeeded in .bringing supplies and
support to guerrilla units already
entrenched in the Escambray
Mountains.
The rebel claims were backed by

U.S. Objects to Proposal in UN
To Bar Aid toAnti-Castro Rebels

a radio station calling itself "Ra-
dio Escambray Libre" (free Es-
cambray) which was heard here.
The station said it was broadcast-
ing from the Escambray Moun-
tains and reported that the guer-
rillas had been joined by the
sea-borne newcomers after bloody
fighting.
Castro's radio conceded that
some elements of the invading
force remained on Cuban soil, de-
spite heavy casualties and the loss
of equipment. As the struggle
wound up its fourth day, the
bearded Cuban premier remained,
or continued to be kept, in the
background.
The Cuban government radio
called for a big rally at Havana
University at 9 p.m. last night
but there was no word as to
whether Castro would attend.
There was still no hint in broad-
casts heard here of the Cuban
premier's whereabouts. The voice
of the bearded leader has not been
heard on the official radio except
in transcriptions of earlier speech-
es since the day the invasion
started.

ISRAELI INTERROGATION:
Eichmann Claims Obedience
To Instructions from Nazis

propriations, givingC
trol over individual

Congress
projects.

I-

as

UNITED NATIONS (AP) - The
United States sought yesterday to
bar any United Nations action
which might hinder future aid to
forces seeking the overthrow of
Cuban 'Prime Minister Fidel Cas-
tro.
Reliable sources made the Unit-
ed States position known as the
Assembly's political committee
neared a vote on resolutions deal-
ing with the fighting in Cuba.
Meanwhile, Guatemala's Carlos
Alejos charged, that the Castro re-
gime was using Czech and Soviet
weapons to massacre Cubans. He

said "Communists" were piloting
MIG planes and operating Soviet
tanks, and asked for a UN inves-
tigation as to whether Cuba "is
being occupied by foreign troops."
In the face of reports that the
anti-Castro forces had lost their
initial battle, the United States
took a stand. against a Mexican
non-intervention resolution. The
proposal called on all nations to
refuse aid to anti-Castro fighters.
It found substantial support
among 'Asian and African coun-
tries, and some diplomats said it
had a chance for approval.

JERUSALEM (OP)-In his own
memoirs of the role he played in
Nazi Germany's mass murder ma-
chine,, Adolf Eichmann emerged
yesterday as a dedicated bureau-
crat with a passion for train
schedules and obedience to orders.
He depicts himself as an ad-
ministrator, not a killer.
The picture is etched sharply in
a six-volume, 3,400-page record of
Eichmann's interrogation by Is-
raeli authorities after his capture
last year in' Argentina. In this
massive record, made public by
Israel yesterday, Eichmann denies
accusations that he ordered use
of poison gas to kill Jews in ex-
termination camps and asserts:
"I am neither a Jew-hater nor
an anti-Semite. Some of the rela-
tives of my stepmother married
Jews. Even in Hungary, there
SBORGANA

were my Jewish relatives, which
was never denied."
Again and again, Eichmann de-
nied in rambling answers thathe
took any active part in the estab-
lishment of extermination camps
but stressed he would have obeyed
any orders given him "no matter
what they were."
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TODAY-
Friday, April 21 4:15-Architecture Auditorium
BARTLETT H. HAYES, JR.
Director, The Addison Gallery of American Art
"HAVE WE AN AMERICAN ART?"
Lecture sponsored by the Museum of Art and the Department of Art in
connection with the exhibition of paintings "The Face of the Fifties," now
on view at the Museum.

~COATS
CLEANED and
RE-FINISHED

The Adventures of Munion-
"Goin' to make the scene at the Little
Club tonight?"
"Now, the Big Club has other plans."

C
yT1s es,,
"The Big Club like what's that,
"Lookie "

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