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April 21, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

j

ALLENGE':
Carroll Seeks Technical Aid

By BUEL TRAPNELLI
Robert Carroll of the sociology
partment, in an effort to pro-
ke thought about the cold war
rnong Challenge participants,
sterday suggested in a seminar
at the United States try to win
lies by forcing technological
ranges on the undeveloped na-
ons, rather than by promoting a
3mocratic ideology.
He argued that the United
tates does not have a true democ-
cy, and thus cannot force such
i ideology on another country.
Policies and ideologies have
en subsequent to technical
ange throughout history. "You
ust start with an economic pro-
am, then consensus comes."
Four-Point Plan
Carroll suggested that the Unit-
3 States follow a four-point eco-
imic program to help the un-
veloped countries:
1) These nations must be given
te chance to compete on the
orld market. They do not want
import unless they can also ex-
>rt, especially to the United
ates, which has a tariff rate that
esently prevents such trade. 2)'
Lie nations must lower their birth
,tes. 3) The people must be forc-,
i into mobility, so that they can
cept an industrial economy. 4)
he United States must continue
instill industrial technology in
ose countries.
He maintained that these things
ould occur simultaneously, and
erefore seemed to be impossi-
..
Colloquium Weekend
As another part of the Chal-
nge Colloquium Weekend, Clar-
ce K. Streit, president of the
ternational Committee for At-
ntic Union, will speak at 8 p.m.
day in Aud. A on "Our European
mnmitments and the Emerging
ations."
Challenge will also sponsor two
minars on United States foreign
licy in new countries, both at 4
m. today. Prof. Russell Fifield
the political science depart-
ent will lead a discussion on
utheast Asia in Rm. 3Y of the
chigan Union, and Prof. Rich-
d Park of the political science
partment will head the south
ia seminar in Rm. 3Z.
Lddress Set
)n Language
Professor James J. Jenkins, of
e psychology department, Uni-
rsity of Minnesota, will discuss
[ediation Models of Verbal
arning" at 4:15 today in Aud. B.

-Daily-Henry Yee
DESIRES POLICY - Theodore Ntoampe, Challenge speaker,
strongly recommended that the United States formulate a
definite African policy..
Ntoampe Asks U.S. Change
In Policy toward Africans
j'

By GERALD STORCH
Speaking to a Challenge semi-
nar yesterday, Theodore Ntoampe,
Spec, of Basutoland, said that the
United States must adopt a uni-
form policy toward Africa if itl
wishes to create good will.
"At this stage Africa is not
structured on a continent-wide,
ideology, except for the slight in-
fluence from the colonial powers
who once ruled it," he said.
Thus, there is no reason fbr the
United States to fear that it mrust
pour money into Africa simply to
beat out the Russians, because the
Communist influence is at present
negligible.
Aid Immediately
However, it is imperative that
Africans, who are incredibly poor,
must be aided immediately.
The United Nations could give
aid in raising the basic education-
al and physical living standards
in Africa. The proposed Peace
Corps would be operated by this
body as much as would be finan-
cially possible.
African Industrialization
However Ntoampe stressed that
it is important that no "strings
be attached." Although it is cer-
tainly justifiable to make sure

Calls Is lam
Big Factor
In Pakistan
By DENISE WACKER
Speaking at a Challenge semi-
nar on the emergence, growth and
current political philosophy of
Pakistan, Prof. Zafar Islam, visit-
ing lecturer from Pakistan, stated
that the Islamic religion is one of
the major influences in deter-
mining the direction of Pakistami
development.
Because of the atheistic prin-
ciples of Communism, Pakistan,
the largest Islamic nation, in the
world, "was one of the first coun-
tries to prohibit the existence of
a national Communist party,"
Prof. Islam said.
Before 1953 Russia and Com-
munist China offered no real
threat to Pakistan, but since then
there has been a gradual spread
of Communism towards the Pakis-
tani boarders, he noted.
Seeking Allies
Seeking allies which shared its
political feelings, Pakistan sought
the friendship of the United
States. Because it received eco.-
nomic as well as military and
technical aid, Pakistan is more
free to use its own finances and
men in land renovation and im-
proving the standard of living.
"India affects the United States
policy toward Pakistan," Prof. Is-
lam said. "Before 1947 India was
divided between Moslems and non-
Moslems. There had been an Is-
lamic movement for some 200
years in India before the forma-
tion of Pakistan.
Pakistani Ideology
"While Pakistani ideology is in
agreement with the United States,
the United States sees its relations
to Pakistan not only on the Pakis-
tani level, but in world perspective,
and cannot always agree with it.
Thus tensions rise.
When asked about the Peace
Corps, Islam stated that Pakistan
is in favor of both United States
and international peace corps.
He also said that he was in
favor of youth in the corps since
Pakistanis have already met "the
older people, and desire an op-
portunity to meet the younger
generation of Americans."
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Weinberg Cites Importance
Of German Social Change

By ELLEN SILVERMAN
The change of social laws in re-
gard to the Jewish miority was the
most important single change in
Germany, Prof. Gerhand L. Wein-
berg of the history department
said Tuesday.
Weinberg spoke at the B'nai
Brith Hillel Foundation on "The
Impact on the Persecuted."
Because the customs of the so-
ciety changed, a percentage of the
population was open to persecu-
tion. This brought about a "period
of uncertainty" and fear, he said.
Majority Realize
"The German majority of the
Jewish population was unable to
realize what the implications of
these policies were, and, if they
did, they were not able to get out
of the country, due to immigration
and emmigration regulations."
Weinberg traced the German
programs of isolating the Jews in
ghettos, eliminating them by phy-
sical contact means, and the even-
tual mass extermination policies
begun in the summer of 1942.
He pointed out that the Jews
were not the only people who were
persecuted. The Germans launched
an extermination program on
their own prisoners in mental in-
stitutions and prisons and the
Russian prisoners of war.
Regime Degraded
"The regime degraded the hu-
man being to an instumentality,"
he said, "and they used the basis
of utility of the human to decide
his fate."
In the summer of 1942, the poli-
Ha'yes To Speak
On American Art
Bartlett H. Hayes, Jr. director
of the Addison Gallery of Ameri-
can, Andover, Mass., will speak
on "Do We Have an American
Art?" at 4:15 p.m. today in the
Arch. Aud.

cies shifted from "random mur-
der to the systematic effort of
sending people to extermination
centers."
By the summer of 1944, the pro-
gram had reached its peak. With
the advant of German losses in
the war, the program of exter-
mination faced practical problems
of communication, transportation
and others, and it essentially
broke down.
SGC Plans
Mail Swap
Student Government Council
Wednesday accepted a motion pro-
posed by SGC President Richard
Nohl, '63BAd., to begin a corres-
pondence with the Student Union
of the University of Belgrade.
Nohl read a letter he had re-
ceived from Yugoslavia requesting
regular mailings of the Council's
minutes and The Daily. The Stu-
dent Union also asked Nohl to
send them any important informa-
tion concerning student govern-
ment at the University.
The motion was passed by the
Council members with the stipu-
lation that Nohl request informa-
tion from the Student Union about
their activities on the Belgrade
campus.
SGC also accepted a report by
Per Hanson, '61, for the new mem-
bers of its Finance Committee.
SGC Treasurer William Gleason,
'63, Mary Wheeler, '61, Sally Jo
Sawyer, '62, Arthur Rosenbaum,
'62BAd., and SGC Administrative
John Martin, '62, were appointed.
A motion was passed to officially
congratulate the Americans Com-
mitted to World Responsibility for
their authorship of the working
papers for the National Confer-
ence on Youth Service Abroad,
held recently in Washington.

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8 P.M Aud. A, Angell Hall

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that the money is spent efficient-
ly, the recipients should not be
forced to make political or eco-
nomical commitments.
The aid would be made in the
form of long-term loans so that
the Africans would be free from
"pressures" which result from out-
right gifts.
After colonialism is eliminated,
then the United States would have
the groundwork to formulate a
uniform policy to put the aid into
effect.
Cheerleaders
To Meet Todayv
Pep clubs and cheerleaders from
eight midwestern universities will
meet here today for the Big Ten
Intercollegiate Pep Club Confer-
ence sponsored by the Wolverine
Club to discuss mutual problems.
Clubs and cheerleaders from
Michigan State, Ohio State, Bowl-
ing Green State, Indiana, DePauw,
Notre Dame and Western Michi-
gan Universities and the Univer-
sity of Illinois will attend a two-
day session of workshops and
meetings.

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POETRY PROBLEM:
Jacobson Stresses Value of Grammar

I

By CAROL ISACKSON
Is is important to know gram-
mar not only on a high school lev-
el, but scientifically as well, Prof.
Roman Jacobson, of Stanford Uni-
versity, emphasized Wednesday in
his lecture, "Poetry of Grammar
and Grammar of Poetry."
Jacobson said that the problem
of grammatical structure in poetry
Organization
Notices
Any student organization wishing to
calendar an event(s) for the school
year 1961-62 may send or bring their
requests (indicate the nature of the
event and your choices for dates for
the event) to the Calendaring Commit-
tee of Student Government Council in
the Student Activities Building. The
deadline for requests f or calendaring
is April 24, 1961.
Baha'i Student Group, Weekly Meet-
ing : "The Spiritual Basis of a New
World Politics," April 21, 8 p.m., 2029
Ferdon. Call NO 3-2904 for transporta-
tion.
Congregational-Disciples E & R Stud.
Guild, Luncheon discussion: Conversa-
tion with participation "Peace Walk,"
12 Noon; Fireside with Challenge Col-
loquium speakers C. Streit & R. Kirk,
refreshments, 10 p.m.; April 21, 524
Thompson.
ADULT DANCE
GRAND OPENING
(Frank Sacks)
20-Up-Club
ORCHESTRA & GUESTS
EVERY SUNDAY EVENING
Starting April 23, 8:30-12:00
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U.A.W. Local 182 Hall
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free parking & .door prizes

has never been systematically
analyzed. As a result of this,
many translations are distorted or
even verge upon the ridiculous.
Poor translations may stem sim-
ply from the fact that systems of
languages differ, but .more impor-
tant is that many translators
don't pay special attention to,
grammar. This facet of his work,
said Jacobson "simply remains un-
known to the translator."
Awkward Translations
"If I permit myself to'translate
a Russian eight-line poem liter-
ally, it comes out like a Smithso-
nian Institute translation of In-
dian documents-awkward."
The cause of this problem is the
difference grammatically in pure
Russian and in English which
manifests itself in the translation
-something which the lecturer
demonstrated by rendering what
he termed the "Smithsonian ver-
sion."
Matter of Feeling
Prof. Jacobson commented that
often a person can just "feel" that
a poem has been translated imper-
fectly. When listening to a trans-
lation of Pushkin's Bronze Peter,
he said, "first I didn't know what
was the matter-only I felt some-
thing was wrong." Ultimately, itj
was found that the original was
written in the imperfective while
the poem was rendered in the
perfective.

To further illustrate that lan-
guage is a great barrier and that
some things simply can't be trans-
lated effectively, Prof. Jacobson
related an anecdote of a scholar
who sobbed after reading a poem.
When he tried to explain his
emotions to someone, he gave up
in despair, crying, "When I say it
in another language, it is nothing;
but when I say it in Greek, I must
cry."
After mentioning some of the
more technical problems with
which the translator is confronted,
Prof. Jacobson said that after
studying poetry written during the
last 600 years in 12 languages, he
has concluded that poetry distorts
or even omits many important
grammatical constructions.
'Peace Walkers'
To Discuss Center
Faculty members connected with
the Conflict Resolution Center
will discuss the work of the cen-
ter with the "Walkers for Peace"
and interested students at 4 p.m.
today at 820 E. Washington St.

I

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IV

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