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November 30, 1961 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY,

Democrats Urge Agreement

Khrushchev has made a major
break with Leninist doctrine in
announcing that war is not in-
evitable. The real threat is politi-
cal, economic, and social," he
stressed.
"We must make our desire for
disarmament credible to the Rus-
sians," Mrs. Elise Boulding of the
Center for Conflict Resolution
said. Citing the Women's Inter-
national League for Peace and
Freedom conference with ten So-
viet women, she emphasized that
"they have a genuine identifica-
tion with their government for
releasing them from peasantry and
making them vitally important to
their society. They are positively
poetic in their feeling that society
is moving forward to liberation
from hunger and ignorance."

Literacy Workshop Cites
Each One Teach, One'

I

who served on the Literacy Work-
shop Committee, said. "But the
idea of teaching this to foreign
students not trained in education
is a new one."
It is hoped that these students
will teach the method to illiterate
persons in their country, most of
whom can already speak the lan-
guage. "Once an illiterate is
taught, he is enthusiastic and
teaches others," David said.
In the morning, those attending
the workshop were broken down
to groups of five or 'six persons
each in order to get practice in
applying the technique. They were
told how to secure various prim-
ers, charts, and implements,. al-
ready being made for three hun-
dred languages in which this
method is used.
The students were told about
the psychology of an adult illiter-
ate. Where a teacher is normally
considered to be on a level higher
than that of the student, this re-
lationship changes when one works
with a person over 25 years of
age who lacks confidence in his
ability to learn.
Astrid Benton, '63, chairman of
the committee, conceived of the
workshop after attending the
Konania Foundation in Baltimore
last summer, where the literacy
problem was studied.
The committee plans to pro-
mote the workshop idea at the
campuses of Michigan State Uni-
versity and Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity, and eventually across the
country.
Engineering. L
Grant for Satel
By HELENE SCHIFF
The High Altitude Laboratory'
of the aeronautical and astro-
nautical engineering department
has been given an additional grant
of $450,000, the Office of Research
Administration reported Friday.
The grant, now totalling $990,-
000, was made by the National
Aeronautics and Space Adminis-
tration for the satellite research
project.
The laboratory, directed by Les-
lie M. Jones, research engineer
in the aeronautical and astronau-
tical engineering department, will
work on instrumentation of me-
teorological satellites. Fred L.
Barkman, researchengineer, will
be in charge of the project.
The research is being done in
connection with the Tiros me-
teorological satellite program of
the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration, Jones said.
The present satellites have a
television camera to. take pictures
of clouds covering the earth and
also a radiometer which receives
radiation from the earth and at-
mosphere of the infrared part of
the spectrum, Jones explained.
The researchers plan to place
these radiometers in balloons
which are equipped with high pre-

GraytesPEACE RESEARCH:
Soviet Turn Seminar Views
ToLeity Of Diplomatic
By RONALD WILTON
By FREDERICK ULEMAN very
The members of the Student is w
Law in the Soviet Union since Peace Research Seminar, under tary
the revolution has shown a trend the direction of J. David Singer but t
away from the "coercive element" of the Mental Health Research Th
and toward a "much greater ob- Institute, continued their consi- need
servance of legality," Prof. Whit- deration of models of internation- coun
more Gray of the Law School said al relations systems at their meet- sellr
yesterday. ing yesterday. unde
Prof. Gray, speaking at a so- The first new model, presented turn
ciology colloquium on Soviet law, by Philip B. Gladstone, '63, dealt to g
also noted that the pattern of with the Marxian economic view- for t
"educating the Soviet citizen into point. As a basis for his presen- chea
a new person" will continue until tation Gladstone used four models they
the achievement of the Communist presented by Singer at a previous Th
ideal. session. to t
Within this ideal, he explained, The first of these holds that deve
the Soviets envisage the "creation nation A and nation B, each pro- coun
of new responses and attitudes" moting their own interests, will area
such that the citizen will act in eventually come into conflict with twee
the best interests of society and each other. However these con-
the settling of disputes will pass flicts will always be settled by
from 'a state to a public function. diligent diplomacy.
When the Bolsheviks took power Individuals Deviate
they abolished the pre-revolu- The second model views the de-
tionary courts but, within a month, viant individual and nation as the
found the need of legal regulation force that deviates from a peace-
to settle "just the ordinary dis- ful path and plunges the world
putes that arise in every society," into war. Gladstone declared that
Prof. Gray said. the Marxists reject this view, as c
To meet this need, the Soviets they believe that economics deter-
established a system of simple mine the conditions within a na-
laws interpreted by "lay judges." tion and these determine how an
Within months, these judges ask- individual acts.
Gladstone said that the third SI
model, one supposedly held by
Marxists, was not a true model.
"They believe that the conflict is
either between the working and
capitalist classes or the socialist
and capitalist nations. 'Thisndoes
not hold, because Russia is not. a
socialist state," he explained.
-- - The fourth model maintains
that the fault lies in the system
rather than in the individual.
"Since they believe there will al-
ways be class wars they agree with
this," Gladstone said.
He explained that the main con-
> flict between the United States
a4 and the Soviet Union is the com-
petition for control of markets
and natural resources, and also for
sources on capital' investment.
Under the capitalist system, the
working class produces most of the
wealth but gets back little in re-
WHITMORE GRAY turn. Consequently, they can buy
discusses legality-
ed for the establishment of pre-
cedent, regulation and trained as-
sistance.A
Once these requests had been
granted, the courts asked someA
system of appellate courts to aid ARE STI LL LE
legal uniformity and a compre-
hensive code of civil law. Their
present structure, Prof. Gray not-
ed, is "very much similar" to
Western law.
b GeTHURSDAY EVEN
SATURDAY M
Elite Research *
cision aerial cameras. The pictures BLXDI MEN ELSSOH
will show the terrain of the earth DOX OFFICE OPEN
and with the data from the radio-
meters they will be able- to corre
late radiation patterns of various
types of terrain, Jones added.
In essence the engineers will Dia +
be checking out the radiometers NO 2-6264
before they are used in the satel- \i1B
lites and improving them where
necessary.
TROY
DONAHUE
j b CONNIE
STEVENS
ANO
DIAL NO -6416b DOROTHY

"rA farce about eGUIRE
fearless
Astronauts. O
The incidents NOLAN OSd
are funny!" - PRW TECHN
-Bosley Crowther, .ST mAx swR- TECH
N.Y. Times STARTING SUIs
KENNETH MORE IRVING BERU
in
M.oMn nthe
CROSBY K
-FRIDAY- ROSEMARY '
"THE CHEATERS"a 'CLOONEY*E

i

systems
Relations
little. Much of the wealth
asted on such things as mili-
equipment and advertising,
here is still a surplus.
ese surpluses bring about a
for markets. The capitalist
tries have the tendency to -
manufactured goods to the
rdeveloped countries in re-
for raw materials. They try
et the highest possible price
heir own goods and pay the
pest price for the resources
get in return.
is forces capitalist countries
ry to control these under-
loped areas. When- too many
tries try to control the same
there will be conflict be-
n them, he explained.
PHOTOS
by
B UD-MOR
03 S. Univ. NO 2-6362
OUTH
DUADDIES
ONLY 9
"SHOPPING" DAYS
Left Until
NOEL
MODE RN E
December 9th
GET YOUR DATES
AND TICKETS
NOW!
D SEATS
FT FOR
TATION OF
HO!
ING AND
ATINEE
IN THEATRE
112 NOON
ENDING
SATURDAY

NICOLOR* FROM WARNER BROS.
NDAY
VERA-
LLN

I

I.

4:10 Arena Theater
TODAY

Admission Free

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
C Ihe yn a quid
presents
Thursday -and Friday
THE HAPPIEST DAYS
OF YOUR LIFE
7:00 and 9:00
Saturday and Sunday
THE BIRTH OF A NATION
7:00 and 9:30

I

Department of Speech Laboratory Playbill
THE MARRIAGE PROPOSAL
ANTON CHEKHOV

Forty-six years after tis pre-
miere, The Birth of a Nation is
still a controversial film. Basing
his story on the racist novels of
Thomas Dixon, the ambitious
young Griffith produced and di-
rected a mammoth epic of the
Civil War and Reconstruction
that was a mile-stone in cine-
ma history, for the film sudden-
ly maintained a claim to be
considered as a major art form.
Woodrow Wilson, who had it
shown at the White House, de-
clared that it was like writing
history with lightning. The
great audience, accustomed to
sentimental two-reelers, horse
opera,and farce comedy, parted
cheerfully with $2 admissions to
view a remarkable historical
panorama united to a story of
great basic human appeal. The
finale, in which the Ku Klux
Klan rescues the embattled rep-
resentatives. of the Southern
code, was surely the most thrill-
ing climax yet achieved on film
and maintains its effectiveness
today.*
In the chorus of hosannas, a
few critical voices were heard,
challenging not the art of The
Birth of a Nation but its social
message - President Eliot of
Harvard, Jane Addams, Oswald
Garrison Villard. For if the
movie is not, as an eminent film
historian states, "a passionate
and persuasive avowal of the
inferiority of Negro," its most
ardent advocate could not deny
that it does not challenge a sin-
gle' assumption of the system
that then and now condemns
the vast majority of Negroes to
lives of poverty and ignorance.
He could truly say that the film
buttresses all the strereotyped
,ideas essential to the mainte-
nance of discrimination. Indeed,
it is no accident that at the time
of the troubles in Little Rock,
the picture was shown locally
"with advertisin~g that claimed
this was what happened under
integration.
"The Birth of a Nation pul-
sates; it is life itself." This is
the verdict, not of an ivory tow-
er esthete, but of a critic who
was painfully aware of the po-
litical and social tendentious-
ness of the film. The film can
still pose a dilemma for those
who believe in freedom for the
arts and yet wonder if the art
work is not being taken at the
lowest possible denominator
and effective most of all as a
propaganda message. But this is
an obvious burden of democrat-
ic freedoms and surely prefer-
able to any alternative of cen-
sorship and control.
Griffith, who accepted com-
pletely the Southern myth he
had learned from his Confeder-
ate father, was greatly upset by
the charges of racial prejudice
against The Birth of a Nation.
Did he not excise the most viru-
lent passages from the Dixon
novels? Did he hate Negroes? A
pamphleteering war ensued.
The large profits he made from
The Birth of a Nation were lost
in his ensuing film, Intolerance,
in which he inveighed against
lack of human understanding.
In his World War I film, Hearts
of the World, he included a
scene in which a white soldier
kisses a dying Negro comrade,
which for numerous reasons-a
lack of fundamental morality
could be advanced as one -
would not gain the screen in
this enlightened year of 1961.
In Broken Blossoms, one of his
later masterpieces, he deals
boldly with the social problems

rection of the distortions
found in most history books
can be found in W.E.B. Du
^Bois's Black Reconstruction.
See also W. J. Cash's The
Mind of the South.
World War II Is over, but the
problems it created are not. The
Ministry of Education is con-
fronted with a shortage of
schools. What is to be done?
"Consolidate," suggests a dry
voice somewhere behind the col-
umns of forms and memos at
the far end of the table. "But
of course!" is the ecstatic reply
of the others around the long
table-each restricting his ec-
stacy to a whisper so as not to
blow the dust and papers off the
table. "But of course! Jolly good
idea, Surchmite!" (As an ex-
pression of their gratitude and
because he had performed be-
yond the call of duty, Lord
Surchmite is bronzed and placed
on a pedestal at the far end of
the committee room). And
"consolidate" they do: "Let the
boys at St. Swithens move
across country and share facili-
ties with the boys at Nutbourne!
Jolly good show, Surchmite!"
We would be the last to criti-
cize the noble work of such de-
voted and inspired administra-
tors as those in the Ministry of
Education. ' Nevertheless, the
Ministry has made a mistake.
Picture, if you will, the children,
the teachers, and the head of
St. Swithen's marching briskly
up to the portals of Nutbourne
Hall and you too must question
the Ministry's decision. Yes, St.
Swithen's is a girl's school. Im-
agine the horror that takes hold
somewhere in that mammoth
bosom of St. Swithen's head-
mistress, Miss Whitchurch (for
she is under the illusion that
Nutbolurne. is a girl's school)
when she reads the Nutbourne
school motto - "Defend Thine
Honor" and finds boxing gloves
in the wall lockers.
But what of Wetherby Pond
(Alastair Sim), headmaster of
Nutbourne? He apparently has
not seen the new arrivals for he
is smugly rubbing his hands and
optimistically anticipating his
future. A remarkable adminis-
trator (one need but look about
the campus or talk to the sub-
dued boys that walk here and
there for evidence of his abili-
ties), Wetherby is looking for-
ward to the visit' from the
school's governors, certain thit
they will reward his talents
with a more lucrative educa-
tional position. '
Is it any wonder that on
learning what has happened,
Wetherby stops his smug hand-
rubbing, turns to Miss Whit-
church and groans: "Someone
is guilty of an appalling sexual
aberration"?
But Mr. Pond and Miss Whit-
church (Margaret Rutherford)
are no ordinary schoolmasters.
They can adjust to the unusual.
Reminding herself of her own
school's slogan "Effort, St.
Swithen's, Effort," Miss Whit-
church (who can best be de-
scribed as a relic of the Nibel-
ungen, a Brunhilde in walking
shoes) inflates her full propor-
tions and makes a decision:
"Cut out biology!'
Yet chaos and riot are
ahead. Because they are anxious
to keep the state of affairs at
Nutbourne secret, the simulta-
neous visit of the girl's parents
and Nutbourne's governors pre-
sents a new challenge.
Split-second changes (boys

i
_f r
.i
}

A HANGOUT
without
A HANGOVE R
Drown your sorrows in coffee
at the LEAGUE SNACK BAR

I

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