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November 18, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-18

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18, loot

THE MICHIEAN DAIL

Ailiance for Progress Ready

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World News Roundup

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WASHINGTON () - President
John F. Kennedy's Alliance for
Progress program for Latin Amer-
ica, a vast new plan to speed so-
cial and economic development
of that area, is reported ready to
roll after a bumpy start.
High United States officials
said this Monday, adding they
considered it remarkable that a
program of such scope could be
put into operation on a broad
scale 'In less than 10 months.
They emphasize that the AFP
plan, now adopted formally by
hemisphere republics, has involv-
ed a tremendous amount of work
in Washington-where it became

at times a battle cry among feud-
ing agencies of the government.
This was in addition to much con-
sultation with Uncle Sam's neigh-
bors to the south.
Many projects already are in
operation, and have been for
some months.
In campaign speeches, Kennedy
has said on various occasions that
if elected, one of his first under-
takings would be to shake up
every department in Washington,
if necessary, to get into operation
what he considered a really ef-
fective program for Latin Amer-
ica.

Despite the campaign pro-
nouncements, however, there were
signs of surprise, consternation,
confusion and some back-biting
when the task was begun by White
House aides, joined by Treasury
and Commerce Department ex-
perts, with a sprinkling of offi-
cials from other government agen-
cies.
For years the State Department
had done most of the planning
for Latin America, or looked over
the shoulder of other agencies en-
gaged in such activities.
Thus it was that some State
Department officials were aghast

at the fact the White House peo-
plp and those from other agen-
cies were now, in effect, looking
over the State Department's shoul-
der.
President Kennedy frequently
would call a State Department of-
ficial to inquire about some spe-
cific project. Soon it became clear
to a lot of people that the Presi-
dent himself was interested in a
lot of projects.-
A task force headed by Adolf
A. Berle Jr., one of former Presi-
dent Franklin D. Roosevelt's orig-
inal New Dealers, began coming
up with specific programs.

United States officials were
gravely worried about a financial
and economic crisis in Brazil. Bo-
livia, a country with chronic eco-
nomic, social and political trou-
bles, was having trouble keeping
its people fed. Venezuela, a na-
tion which emerged from a long
period of dictatorship, with its
treasury bare, likewise' appeared
in need of credit to tide it over a
crisis.
Projects were worked out for
these countries, and for others.
United States officials are not
unaware that the AFP program

depends largely on Latin Ameri-
can countries making certain re-
forms in tax, land, investment and
other laws, as did Puerto Rico, to
encourage development. T h e y
know, too, that the AFP plan, is
aimed at bettering the status of
the little fellow, and that some
rich people in the hemisphere are
content to leave things as they
are.
But United States officials and
Latin Americans who favor the
plan say the pressures for the
program are so great that it will
move ahead, with or without co-
operation of the wealthy.

Indian Aide
Takes Issue
Over Troons

Ong
for

o Commander
Reinforcements

Request Received
At Private Session
UNITED NATIONS (A) - The
United Nations commander in
The Congo yesterday asked for
more troops to deal with mount-
ing violence, but Indian Defense
Minister V. K. Krishna Menon
promptly questioned the need for
reinforcements.
Maj. Gen. Sean McKeown, Irish
commander of the 15,400-man
force, made his bid at a private
session ;of the 18-nation Congo
Advisory Committee summoned by
Acting Secretary - General U
Thant.
Krishna Menon first took issue
with McKeown in the private
meeting. Later he told the Secur-
ity Council: "If 15,000 troops are
not enough to police The Congo,
then there is something wrong
with the troops."
One-Third Indian
The remarks of the Indian lead-
er were given considerable atten-
tion because India's 5,700 troops
there make up more than one-
third of the entire UN force in The
Congo.
Krishna Menon told the Coun-
cil "India might, or might not be
able to supply more troops."
It was the first time the acting
secretary-general had met with
his advisory committee, made up
of nations which have troops in
the UN Congo force, or have con-
tributed to it. .
The advisory committee meeting
was called to hear the views of
McKeown and C o n o r Cruise
O'Brien, chief UN representative
in Katanga Province, who were
called to New York for urgent
consultations.:
Reliable Sources
The meeting was behind closed
doors, but reliable sources gave
this account:
McKeown said he needed more
troops in The Congo. He stressed
that he should be able to dispatch
a battalion, or approximately 1,-
000 troops, instead of 250 when
trouble flares in, a Congo spot.
Menon disputed the need for
more troops. He said that soldiers
in large numbers were apt to
stumble over one another, and
that the emphasis now is on small-
er contingents.
Thant, who presided, remarked
that for obvious reasons the ad-
visory committee was not the best
place to discuss military matters.
Thant called McKeown and
O'Brien home from the Congo for
consultations. It will be up to U
Thant to request more troops if he
believes they are needed.
FOLK MUSIC
THE NEW LOST
CITY RAMBLERS
"A fabulous Trio"
-San Francisco Chronicle
"fresh and strong"
-Chicago Tribune
"More than an entertaining
program of folk music
-Christian Science Monitor
Y*
"The absolute best group
now recording" -LSR

U THANT
.. .hears request

OCTOBER:
Business
Gain Seen
WASHINGTON (AP)-The busi-
ness recovery got its second wind
in October, government reports
showed yesterday, and there were
predictions that November will
bring some solid gains in October
in new housing starts, manufac-
turers' sales of autos and other
durable goods, and in the volume
of new orders arriving at factor-
ies.
The Labor Department report-
ed new highs in payroll employ-
ment-it went up 170,000 to 55.3
million-and in the earnings of
factory workers. The factory
work-week lengthened also.
These reports, coming on the
heels of previous announcements
that industrial production in Oc-
tober regained its peak rate and
retail sales rose 21/2 per cent after
a summer lull, raised official hopes
that joblessness finally will start
dropping.

Congo Sets
Punishment
Measures
LEOPOLDVILLE (P-The Con-
go government agreed yesterday to
joint measures with the United
Nations to punish the mutinous,
army murderers of 13 Italian air-
men and to investigate whether
leftist Antoine Gizenga played a
role in the butchery.
Plane loads of UN troops were
flown in to reinforce the 200-man
garrison already at Kindu in Ki-
vu Province where about 80 mu-
tinous Congolese got beyond con-
trol Saturday and killed theun-
armed airmen. The Italians were
on a UN transport mission.
Seal Off
UN orders were to seal off the
Kindu area and disarm the 1,000
or so Congolese troops who once
formed part of Gizenga's army
when he set up a Soviet-supported
rebel rule at Stanleyville in Ori-
ental Province.
The encirclement and disarma-
ment was to permit a "fair in-
vestigation and' stern punish-
ment" of the guilty, the UN said.
Troop Rebellion
Diplomatic sources have report-
ed-and The Congo government
fears-that Gizenga, the political
heir of the late Premier Patrice
Lumumba, stirred up the troop
rebellion in new and open defi-
ance of the central government
and the UN.
Government sources said he was
in Kindu last Tuesday-before it
was known the Italians had been
killed. Gen. Victor Lundula, Gi-
zenga's former army chief, and
Interior M i n i s t e r Christopher
Gbenye, met him in his Kindu
hideout briefly that day-and al-
most immediately were run out of
town by unruly troops.
They had gone to Kindu from
Leopoldville to attempt to settle
the mutiny and seek the release
of the Italians.

THREAT TO PEACE:
Rusk Condemns North
Viet Nam Communists
WASHINGTON R)-Secretary of State Dean Rusk said yester-
day Communist North Viet Nam's effort to destroy the Republic of
South Viet Nam is a threat to the peace of the world.
The issue, Rusk told a news conference, may be brought before
the United Nations at some stage.
In his first news conference this month, Rusk said also that
President John F. Kennedy's offer of last May to commit five Polaris
atomic-missile submarines to NATO still stands.
Concerning the Berlin wall, Rusk remarked it "certainly ought
not to be a permanent feature of the European landscape."
"I see no reason," Rusk continued, "why the Soviet Union should
think that it is to their advantage in any way to leave there that
monument to Communist failure .. . that prison wall, to demonstrate
for all to see that they are having to keep people in behind walls and
barbed wire."
Rusk called the situation in Viet Nam "a major and serious con-
cern" not only to the divided Southeast Asian country and its neigh-
bors but to the whole world.

rC OME

7 o

ROBERT McNAMARA
. . . safety inspection

CRr H ir
~AB BATHr

By The Associated Press
ACAPULCO-Thousands gath-
ered in Nuxco yesterday pleading
for food while the villages count-
ed perhaps 300 dead from flood-
waters that surged after Cyclone
Tara ravaged the Mexicali Pacific
countryside last weekend.
* * *
WASHINGTON-Secretary of
Labor Arthur J. Goldberg told'
warring labor unions yesterday to
make peace and get busy with the
organizing job that he said they
have been neglecting to the detri-
ment of the nation.
* * *
BELGRADE -- President Mar-
shal Tito left last night far Cairo
for a weekend meeting with Pres-
ident Gamal Nasser of the United
Arab Republic and Prime Minis-
ter Jawaharlal Nehru of India.
WASHINGTON-A Civil Aero-
nautics Board examiner ruled yes-
terday that the airlines "Uni-
versal Air Travel Plan"and vari-
ous other airline and non-airline
credit card plans are illegal.
* * *
BERN-Rioting Swiss farmers
besieged the parliament building
yesterday in the first violent dem-
onstration in this sedate capital in
more than four decades. About 3,-
000 farmers took part in the riot
after hearing speeches against,
government restrictions on in-
creases in the price of milk, wheat
and other products. The demon-
strators had begun as an orderly
march on Bern by more than 30,-
000 farmers.
* * *
NEW YORK - United States
Ambassador to the United Nations
Adlai E. Stevenson said yesterday,
the UN will be broke and credit-

Planes Must
Pass Tests
WASHINGTON (,") - Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara
yesterday directed nonscheduled
airlines to submit to strict mili-
tary safety inspection if they want
to carry troops in the United
States.
McNamara's directive came nine
days after 74 army recruits per-
ished in a plane crash near Rich-
mond.
This means nonskeds moving
troops within the United States
must comply with the same stiff
rules that cover transportation of
military passengers on overseas
flights.
PHOTOS
by
BUD-MOR
1103 S. Univ. NO 2-6362

less by the end of March unless
the "financial crisis" caused by
the Congo crisis is settled. The
stark fact is that if the members
will not pay for the United Na-
tions. they will not have it.
WASHINGTON - Secretary of
State Dean Rusk said yesterday
that the United States offer to
provide the North Atlantic Trea-
ty Organization with its own nu-
clear force is still open. The issue
will probably be discussed by
President John F. Kennedy and
German Chancellor Konrad Ade-
nauer. He also called for Western
Hemisphere support for proposals
by Colombia, a call for a foreign
ministers conference to consider
threats to peace, and Peru, call-
ing for an investigation for Cuba's
Fidel Castro regime.
NEW YORK-The stock market
erased early losses and closed a
bit higher on balance Friday as a
strong buying urge improved prices
in final dealings. Standard and
Poor's 500 Index was unchanged
while 425 industrials advanced
dropped off .04, 25 rails advanced
.20, and 50 utilities were up .20.
American Telephone and Tele-
graph closed at an all time higl
of 1308.
Rockefeller, Wife
Plan To Separate
NEW YORK () - Republicar
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, re-
garded as a potential 1964 candi-
date for president, yesterday an-
nounced that he and his wife of
31 years have agreed to a legal
separation.

ON

7 h

1i

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast ot the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(Holy Communion cn first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer. The Rev. Kenneth
Goss.
TUESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAY-
12:10 p.m. Holy Communion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 p.m. Daily evening prayer.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE:
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M., 12:00
Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses: 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help,
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
f (Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, 802 Monroe.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
9:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, 802 Monroe.
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.

THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH'
OF ANN ARBOR

SERVICES:
9:00 Henry Kuizenga
10:30 Henry Kuizenga
11:50 David Van Winkle

Services Sunday:,
;9:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m'. Louis Briner, Pro-
fessor at McCormick Theological Seminary.
11:50 a.m. David Van Winkle.
CAMPUS CENTER
Sunday
11:30 a.m. Coffee Hour.
Presbyterian Campus Center
9:30 a.m.hSeminar "Scrutinizing the Chris-
tian Faith."
Guild House
802 Monroe
Tuesday
12:00-1 :00 Luncheon at the Guild House.
"Topics of Ultimate Concern."
9:00-11:00 p.m. TEA and TEAology
217 S. Observatory
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11 :15: Services, with ser-
mon by the pastor, "Thanksgiving Opportu-
nities."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Classes.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper-Program. Taking of group
picture for Ensian with Business meeting
afterword.
Thursday at 9:45: Thanksgiving Day Service.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, ,Postor
Miss Anna Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622
Sunday-
9:00 A.M. Worship Service.
10:00 a.m: Bible Study.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service and.Holy Com-
munion.
7:00 P.M. "Federal Aid to Education," Pro-
fessor of Law, Paul Kauper, speaker.
Thursday-10:00 a.m. Thanksgiving Day Serv-
ice.
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3 -29¢9
William S. Baker, Minister

NOVEMBER 19, 1961
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship,
nobody home in our world?", Sermon by
Rupert. The Servicie is broadcast at 11
A.M. on station WOIA.

"Is
Dr.
:15

10:15 A.M. Seminar on World Understanding:
Africa. Leader, Ted Ntoampe from Basuto-
land.
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
7:00 P.M. Worship and Program, "Why I
am a Methodist." Dr. Hoover Rupert.
TUESDAY
8:00 P}M. Study Group on Contemporary the-
ologians: Tillich. Jean Robe's apartment.
9-11:00 p.m. Open House at Jean Robe's
apartment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast in Pine Room. Out in time for
8 A.M. classes.
WEST SIDE METHODIST
900 S. Seventh St.
Since 1846
Worship Services and Church School 9:00 and
11:00: "Difference in Commitment." Dr.
Whited, preaching.
Church School & Nursery Care., Large Parking
Area, Mothers' Rooms.

Morning Worship 10:45 a.m,
Church School and Child Care.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron - NO 3-9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr: George Pickering, Intern Minister
SUNDAY:
9:45 a.m. Campus Discussion Class-I Corin-
thians 11-16.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship. Sermon: "Shall
We Say Grace?" Mr. Middleton, preaching.
6:45 p.m. Student Fellowship. Play reading
and discussion of WAITING FOR GODOT.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. "Puritanism-
A Spiriitual Oasis," Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
Bible Lecture at 10:20, "Thanksgiving," by
Mrs. Luchs.
Church School: ages crib through Senior High:
9:30-10:30 and 11:00-12:00.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.

WEDNESDAY-

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