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November 18, 1961 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-18

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Tmo

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TWO THE 1~HCHIGAN DAILY

ocI0LOGY COLLOQUIM:
Lipset Compares Societies

By CYNTHIA NEU
"A Comparative Analysis of the
English-Speaking Democracies"-
the United States, Great Britain,
Australia and Canada-was pre-
sented by Prof. Seymour Lipset
of the University of California-
Berkeley at a sociology colloquium
Thursday.
The four countries were rank-
ed relativeto each other along
four polarities: elitism-equaitar-
ianism, achievement-description,
particularism - universalism,' and
diffuseness-specificity. The ranks
were derived from reports and
objective evidence of the. opera-
tion of institutions in the various
countries.
Great Britain ranked highest
4n elitism, achievement, particul-
arism and diffuseness, while the
United States ranked highest to-
ward the other pole, except in
equalitarianism, in which Aus-
tralia was highest.
Base of Differences
The manifestations of the dif-
ferences between Great Britain
and the United States are based
on the degree to which nations
break away from the past. For ex-
ample, the United States broke
through revolution, while Britain
maintained the theory of elite
rights.
Manifestations of these differ-
ences can be seen in the educa-
tion systems and legal systems,
Prof. Lipset explained.
The British system of education
is based on an elitish principle
which assumes that society func-
tions :best if only the number of
people are trained that are need-
ed to fill the elite roles.
Right To Compete
The United States assumes that
everyone has the right to com-
pete for elite positions and thus
should have the opportunity for
education. A committee on educa-
tion under the Truman adminis-
tration recommended a goal of
two-thirds of the population hav-
ing higher education, a theory
that would not be acceptable in
Britain.
Although both the American
and British legal systems are
based on common law, because of
the elitism and descriptive ele-

ment in Britain, there is less need
for formal law and legal institu-
tions.
For example, the United States
Securities and Exchange Commis-
sion oversees stock and bond
transactions, while in Britain the
stock issuing houses are family
owned by a small elite group which
reinforce each other. A house
would be ostracized for any un-
derhanded dealings.
The three other English-speak-
ing democracies are former col-
onies of Britain, but Australia and
Canada are more like the United
States than like Britain.
Counter-Revolutions
"Canada is a country of coun-
ter-revolutions," Prof. Lipset ex-
plained. While there were pro-
revolution elements in Canada
during the American Revolution,
they failed and at the end of the
war sympathizersi moved to the
United States and Tories migrat-
ed to Canada.
Thus, the political image of
Canada is of an "overseas Brit-
ain" with conservatives dominat-
ing and a reaffirmation of elitism
demonstrated throughout history,
In Australia, equality is strong-
er than in the United States and
Canada, but achievement and
universalism are weaker, and
there is little elitism, or respect
for positionas such.
The historical 'basis for this,
according to Prof. Lipset is that
Australia was founded as a penal
colony and working class settled
there. Leftist groups have played
a major role, as the Labor Party
dominating during the period of
growth, and demonstrate the
equalitarian element..
See Evidence
The manifestations of the polar-
ities have shown on the political
scene in many ways, Prof. Lipset
explained.
In the United States, populism
is the rule, with the orientation
that the people have the collec-
tive wisdom, rather than the elite,
and the majority rights and rule
prevail.
Prof. Lipset cited the anti-Com-
munist crusades as an example

of populous attack on the elite
which appeals to anti-elitist ele-
ments.
Anti-Communism
In addition to the McCarthy
era and the more recent John
Birch Society, in the United
States, Australia also has an ele-
ment of anti-communism. This is
demonstrated especially in the
area of academic freedom under
the notion that the people have
a right to tell professors what to
do; Prof. Lipset said.
The United States and Aus-
tralia are also similar in their at-
titudes toward law and order and
are willing to tolerate breaks of
law under a weakened pressure to
conform due to the lack of an
elite heritage. These two coun-
tries have the highest strike rates,
for example.

Councilmen
Candidacies
Announced
Republican Wendell E. Hulcher,
incumbent councilman in the
Fourth Ward and Ford Motor
Company executive, announced
yesterday his candidacy for re-
election to the City Council in
April, making him the fourth
councilman in as many days to
announce his candidacy for re-
election.
Hulcher is also a member of the
Ann Arbor Human Relations Com-
mission.
On Wednesday, Republican
John Dowson, Second Ward coun-
cilman and a member of the
City Planning Commission, an-
nounced his candidacy. Council-
man Robert E. Meader of the
Third Ward announced Thurs-
day.

College Roundup

Olson Delivers Warning
Against Generalizations

GRAD
After-the-Game PARTY
American Legion
SAT., NOV. 18
Immediately after the IOWA game

By JOHN McREYNOLDS
One must be wary of unproven,
"common sense" generalizations
about education, according to
Dean Willard Olson of the edu-
cation school.
Dean Olson gave his speech, en-
titled "Current Myths that are
Questioned by Research," last
night at the Phi Delta Kappa ini-
tiation banquet.
"The biggest problem," Olson
said, "is that too many people
are completely sure they are right
about problems in education.
However, they must make certain
assumptions which are on the sur-
face logical and reasonable, but
are simply not born out by the
f acts.
Students Surprising
"It is surprising that students
of education should believe all the
things they hear unquestioningly.
Too often research indicates that
some generalizations are on the
level of chance, and that results
supporting the generalization are
attributable to faulty research de-
sign or misinterpretation.
Such generalizations are so
much a part of educational folk-
lore that they deserve the desig-
nation of myths.
Dean Olson rejected a number
of selected educational myths,
stating that there were many
others and that the list was only
a group of the more important
fallacies.
Olson Refutes
Dean Olson refuted the value of
organization in learning prob-
lems, of ability groupings (honors
classes, in particular), of early
formal education (the study of
rigorous subjects), of the prep-
aration of the teacher or the time
spent in class or on homework.
"Simple, or 'partialist,' answers
do not exist for complex prob-
lems," he counseled.
Dean Olson cited a number of

SPONSORED BY
Stag or Drag

MICHIGAN UNION PRESENTS

BIG

CLUB

I

"IT IS A POWERFUL MOVIE"
--Richard Ostling, Michigan Daily
"Hard-Hitting! Realistic! Memorable!"
-A. T. Weiler, N.Y. Times

* Graduate Student Council
$.25 per person

KIRK
DOUGLAS
IN
TOWN
WITHOUT,
PITY

i

By JUDITH BLEIER
BERKELEY-Student govern-
ment should not take stands on
off campus issues several members
of the University of California
student goyernment council said
recently.
Representative -at -large Pete
Steiner said. the purpose of stu-
dent government is to let the stu-
dents express themselves and run
their own affairs at the university.
He defined students affairs as
what concerns students on cam-
pus.
John Grissim said student gov-
ernment gives students a channel
for participating in extra-curric-
ular activities and to solve their
own problems.
* * *
ATLANTA-Emory University's
board of trustees has announced
that applications from students
would be considered without re-
gard to race if George tax laws
were changed.
Henry L. Bowden, of the board,
has said that under the State
Constitution private educational
institutions had tax-exempt stat-
us only when operating on a seg-
regated, basis.
A spokesman from the univer-
sity has said that the board did
not intend to make a legal test of
the provision. However,' its an-
nouncement carried an implied
invitation to interested Negroes to
do so.
JACKSON-Tougaloo Southern
Christian College is the only inte-
grated college in Mississippi.
Until recently, the only white
students attending the school have
been children of faculty and staff,
members, but this year two white
women have enrolled.
The two are Joan Trumpower,
of Washington, D.C. and Charlotte
Phillips, a former student at
Swarthmore College. Miss Trum-
power is a former Freedom Rider,
but Miss Phillips says she is not a
member of any anti-segregationist
group and that she is not in Mis-
sissippi to serve the purposes of
any group.
"I didn't come down here to
Pianist Eisenstadt
To Give Recital
Beula Eisenstadt, Grad, pianist,
will present a recital at 8:30 p.m.
Saturday in Lane Hall Aud.
The program will include "Sona-
ta in B-flat, K. 570," by Mozart;
"Sonatine," by Ravel, 4nd "Car-
naval, Op. 9" by Schumann.
111U II 19ftDIAL 2-6264
IDllIsG TDA
ENDING TODAY

make news," she said. "Somebody
has to make democracy work."
*, * *
STOCKTON - The establish-
ment of 15 "cluster colleges," sim- -
ilar to the Oxford pattern, is
contemplated by the University of
the Pacific at Stockton.
One of these, marking a depar-
ture from the United States' pres-
ent educational system, will offer
a curriculum to be taught entire-
ly in Spanish, with English as a
"foreign language."
Dr. Robert E. Burns, university
president, announced that the
cluster colleges will be built in
the next 15 years. "The great
scourge of the American higher
education system is that universi-
ties are getting so big that stu-
dents are losing identity."

The Men of

r--

BRIGITTE BARDOT I

SIGMIA ALPHA 'MU

11

in

En Effeuillant La Margerite

WILLARD C. OLSON
... wary of generalizations
cases which seemed to prove his
case, and challenged anyone to
bring any definite evidence as to
the value of the conceptions whose
value he refuted.
"Look at the data," he said,
"and draw your own, conclusions.
Be on the alert for myths ques-
tioned by research."
PARTY
FAVORS
BUD-MOR
1103 S. Univ. NO 2-6362

Tuesday, $:40 P..
Multi-purpose room, UGLI
CERCLE FRANCAIS

music by
JOHN BELL'S BAND

cordially invite
All Students

I

$1.50

TODAY
9:30-12:30 (Late Per)
featuring the
ARBORS

to

Delta Gamma Sorority
invites everyone to an
OPEN HOUSE

THE HAWKEYE DANCE

I

'1

DIAL 5-6290

TONIGHT 8-12

after the

Iowa game

Continuous
Today fZ1 !k'IIb
From 1 P.M.
Guinness Festival * 2 Encore Hits!

DIAL
NO 8-6416

800 Lincoln

Free Refreshments
1800 WASHTENAW

Dancing

ALEC GUINNESS BEST ACTORIOF THE YEAR SCORES A NEW TRIUMPHI"
ALEC -Cuts Magazine
GUIIIHSS1KID HEARTS
G NIV E VALERIE JOAN " N H A
RIC IIOSO REENWO B
AND
'Solid satre...a choice piece of movie foolery"-Newsweek
as 5 ' MAN
IN THE!
4Iso starring Joan Greenwood and Cecil Parker
A J. Arthur Rank Organization Presentation

Entertainment and Refreshments

®-

I,

Iv

SQUARE DANCE,
Sponsored by the
International Student Association
Saturday, Nov. 18 8:30 P.M.
Women's Athletic Building
Members Free Non-Members 50c

50c

ACWR'S Department of Studies on the U.N.

presents

I

AN INTRODUCTORY PANEL DISCUSSION

pwod w

r

Il

No

SHOWS AT }L
1:00-3.30-6:10
and 8:55
FEATURE 30
minutes
later.
SARTING SUNDAY

I

ON

I

_" - -

FOLK MUSIC

I

*

*

*

New Lost City Ramblers

Cinemna ajwI
TONIGHT and Sunday at 7 and 9
MY
UNIVERSITIES

UNIVERSITY

A UNITED NATIONS

'4

*

*

*

Mike

Seeger
Tom Paley
John Cohen

Participants:

- PROF. KENNETH BOULDING
- PROF. JOHN S. BRUBACHER
- nn meiTA L u E LI _kA i EI.

41.

-lir

-Ar

R

I

i N W'Inumu

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