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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 11, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WE

Claude Cites.
.dVantages
By FREDERICK ULEMAN
'hile introductory employment
z the federal government ne-
arily involves many routine
es, it provides a ladder of
ortunity to the higher levels
ivil service, Prof. Inis L. Claude
he political science department
yesterday.,
of. Claude was the moderator
he panel discussion on "Ca-
s in the United St tes Gov-
nent." Other members of the
el were Robert Rolfson of the
d and Drug Administration and
ert Kehoe of the Social Secur-
Administration.
Biggest'Insurance Program'x
[he biggest insurance pro-
m in the world" was the way
oe typified the Social Security
ilnistration.
hIe importance of this depart-
t is evidenced by the fact that
ill have 17 million beneficiaries
the middle ofh1963. For thisa
on, he said, the program pre-
s a "tremendous challenge"
the potential for immense
tonal satisfaction.
reign service employment may
ivided between the State De-
nent and United States In-
nation Agency' (USIA) .- The
n difference is that the State
artment employe tells the
bed States government what is
pening abroad and the USIA
the people ' abroad what is
pening in this country, Prof.
ide said.
Inspectors, Chemists
portunities in -the Food and
g Administration are of two
s. It employs inspectors to in-
igate conditions and collect
ples and chemists to analyze
lucts. These random samples
checked to insure that they are
, safe and correctly labeled,
to insure against unfair com-
tion, Rolfson said.
11 of the agencies require suc-
ful completion of a Ctvil Ser-
test before employment. The
ign services have their own
ninations, but the Federal
vice Entrance Examination is
tmon to the other =two.
SGive Flu Shots
t Health Service
ealth Service spokesmen have
ounced that influenza immu-
tions will be given from 8-
10 a.m. and from 1-4:30 p.m.
orrow at Health Service.
hus far, over 5,600 shots have
n given to students and fac-
, and at present there is only
ugh vaccine for tomorrow's
,ulations.

Resistance Entrenched
In Civil Rights Struggle
G (Continued from Page 1)
cumstances ,surrounding the killing of Lee. Thus, the federal gov-
ernment has shown a willingness to assist the students whenever it
feels its own jurisdiction is unquestioned. Such an interest may also
reflect a preference in Washington for voter registration campaigns as
opposed to the politically more embarrassing direct action programs.
SNCC has been forced to reappraise its practice of mixing voter
registration and direct action projects as a result of the Burgland
High flare-up. Demonstrations in Mississippi produce mass arrests,
and the longer-range voter registration and education drives are
crippled When the Negro leadership is in jail. There is, in addition, the
moral question of encouraging teenagers to demonstrate and go to
jail when the money for bailing them out is not clearly available.
The outlook for the student movement in McComb is gloomy. Al-
though there was one glimmer of hope-the suggestion by Police'
Chief Guy that a bi-racial committee explore the racial problems of
the community-all else indicates a prolonged and bitter struggle.
Robert Moses and other leaders are in genuine danger of being lynch-
ed. The State of Mississippi is mustering its "best legal minds" to
wage the fight in the courts. A tax-supported institution, the Missis-
sippi Sovereignty Commission, explores ways of maintaining white
supremacy. And in McComb itself threats of economic reprisals and
worse may cause local Negroes to desert the cause.
Mississippi has become a symbol, to SNCC and to the students
of the South. If Pike County can be-cracked, they feel, it will be the
,beginning of the end of the Southern struggle. And if courage can
crack Pike County, they will.
COLLEGE ROUNDUP:- -
.Harvard Turns Down
Feder al Stud ent Loans

Watkins Notes Problems
Of Revising 'U' Bylaws

MANY PROBLEMS:
Disputes Value of Seaway to Michigan

i

By MICHAEL HARRAHI
CAMBRIDGE-Harvard Univer-
sity President Nathan M. Pusey.
has notified the pepartment- of
Health, Education and Welfare
that' his institution will remain
out of the Federal student loan
program for a fourth year.
Pusey based this action on a
continued :objection to the Na-
tional Defense Education Act's
requirement of a disclaimer af-
fidavit, calling it a "blemish on
an otherwise constructive act."
BERKELEY - Robert Meisen-
bach and two 'other University
of California students have filed
a half a million dollar damage
suit against Thomas Hoag, Jr.,,of
Anaheim, Calif. and nine others,
charging them with invasion of
privacy and circulation of police
"smug shots" involved in the 1960
demonstrations against the House
Committee on Un-American Ac-
tivities in San Francisco.
The plaintiffs charged that the
circulation of the photos was a
violation of a state law prohibit-
ing the use of police information
by private persons.
The phptos have been circulated
in a leaflet, with excerpts and
comment by Federal Bureau of
Investigation Director J. Edgar
Hoover.

By SANDRA JOHNSON
For the past two years Herbert
G. Watkins, former Secretary to
the University, has been working
on a revision of University bylaws,
and he says that it is impossible
to predict when this study will be
completed.
Law School Dean E. Blythe
Stason worked eight years on the
previous edition that was finished
in 1948, Watkins pointed out.
The question of whether the
bylaws should be compacted into
a few pages and then supplement-
ed with a manual governing day-
to-day procedural' operation, or
whether they should be left in the
rather lengthy form they now
take, with only the obsolete sec-
tions revised, is still unanswered.
Only New York University, of
all the schools studied, uses the
lengthy form of bylaws as we
do, he said.
The advantage of the shorter
form, including only a short state-
ment of the duties of the Regents
and University administrators, is
that the bylaws would not need to
be revised every time a procedure
of operation is changed. They
would, therefore, tend to become
a more permanent body of legis-
lation, Watkins said.
In adition to a possible change
in form, the new revision must
modernize obsolete sections and
include regulations left out to
date, he added.
Stud Relates -
Zen Principles
To Psychology
A study of a Zen training tech-
nique which may prove useful in
psycho-therepy -is the subject of
a doctorial thesis project presently
being conducted by Edward Mau-
pin of the psychology department.
"Zen and western forms of
psycho - therepy have common
goals," Maupin explained, "al-
though the means of reaching
these goals differ drastically."
Western psychology uses free as-
sociation while Zen uses concen-
tration exercises.
Subjects participating in the
project will take part in one of
these exercises in which they will
sit for a period of time, concen-
trating on their breathing.
Maupin explained that one out.
of five subjects suffer discomfort
during the first sessions. Subjects,
therefore, must have sufficient in-
terest in Zen to be able to under-
go the experiment.
He tested 20 subjects last spring
and plans to test 20 to 30 more
this semester, observing them with
an eye to possible use of concen-
tration techniques in psych-
therapy.

WARSAW-Poland's 71 colleges
and universities have topped their
1960-1961 enrollment by approxi-
mentely 20,000 students, reaching
a record total of 160,000.
The student body includes over
800' foreign students, many of
them from the non-aligned na-
tions of Asia and Africa.
. *
MADISON-The Board of Re-
gents of the University of Wis-
consin has asked Medical School
Dean John Z. Bowers to resign,
following difficulties in, selecting
a new chairman for the surgery
department.
Wisconsin President Conrad A.
Elvehjem refused .to elaborate on
the matter, except to say that
Bowers has asked for a public
hearing.
CHAMPAIGN - Larry Hensen,
president of the Student Senate
at the University of Illinois, has
blasted the "aimless stumbling in
the dark" of the senate and of-
fered a six-point "new image."
Among his target .areas were
of compulsory ROTC, the "curi-
ous" moral justification by the
university for prosecuting stu-
dents after a civil trial and "dis-
criminatory policies" in off-cam-
pus housing and affiliated groups.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

Although James A. Lewis was1
appointed Vice-President for Stu-
dent Affairs in April, 1954, no
provision has been made in the
bylaws for such an office. Like-
wise, there is no mention of a
Vice-President in Charge of the
Dearborn Center, the office cur-
rently held by William E. Stirton.
However the relatively new of-
fice of Vice-President in Charge
of Research, which was established
in Sept., 1959, held currently by.
Ralph A. Sawyer, is included be-
cause "someone took the trouble
to write a bylaw," Prof. Watkins
explained.
These omissions would be reme-
died in the revision. Such addi-
tions must be expected periodically
in a growing University, he said.
Sles Cited
By Noebren
By MARTHA MacNEAL
"European organ music shows
variations between northern and
southern styles and between Cath-
olic and Protestant taste," Prof.
Robert Noehren of the music
school, University organist, said
yesterday.
Prof. Noehren returned last
week from a -two-month recital
tour of Denmark, Germany, Hol-
land, and Switzerland.
"As I traveled from Denmark to
Switzerland, I noticed a subtle
contrast between the more rugged
boldness or northern music and
the warmer softness of southern
music," he said.
Religious Difference
In addition, "there is a differ-
ence in musical taste and in gen-
eral atmosphere between Catholic
and Protestant churches. The sim-
ple Gregorian plainsong tunes of
the medieval church offer a strong
inspiration to Catholic composers
such as Caesar Franck and the
controversial Olivier Messiaen in
contrast to the Lutheran tradi-
tion epitomized by the music of
Bach," Prof. Noehren explained.
Considering the effect of a tour
on artistic performance, Noehren
noted that his concert work was
"actually easier away from home,
because of the absence of pres-
sures other than those of music."
Practice Required
He encountered differences in
European organs since the instru-
ment often reflects nationality in
the color of tone produced by
certain stops. For example, Prench
organs emphasize a brassy quality
which is minimized in other coun-
tries, he said.
But it is necessary to arrive
early and practice twelve to fif-
teen hours on any strange organ
to understand its nature thor-
oughly, Prof. Noehren noted.

By JOHN McREYNOLDS
The St. Lawrence Seaway, a
bitterly-disputed issue between
taxpayers and businessmen, will
be of little use to Michigan ports
and industry, Carlos E. Toro and
Lawrence P. Dowd of the Michi-
gan Business Executives Research
Conference report.
The difficulties come in every
field-transport rates, geography,
training, weather, physical limi-
tations, and labor and material
necessities.
There is a definite limitation in
that the season for which the
ocean-going ships can operate.
The winter months are by necessi-
ty excluded due to ice on the lakes.
For high value exports such as
automobiles this would be a great
deficit, though it would not af-
feet imperishables such as iron
ore or timber.
High Transport Rates
Transport rates would also be,
high, since tolls and travel dis-
tance, including the detour to en-
ter the St. Lawrence River, would
have to raise rates, with higher
costs due to smaller ships being
used.
The rates would also have to be
raised for shipments leaving for
ports which are rarely used, espe-
cially those in the Orient.
The Seaway also is hurt by the
fact that transport costs for ship-
ments to foreign countries are
lower if the land -distance travel-
ed from .manufacturer to port is
over 250 miles. This does not in-
eude the state of Michigan.
Geography Hinders
Geography is a definite hin-
drance to Michigan industry, be-,
cause Detroit, Port Huron, Mus-
kegon and St. Joseph-Benton Har-
bor are unfavorably located in
comparison with Cleveland, To-
ledo, Milwaukee and Chicago.
The latter cities also have larg-
er -loading facilities than their
Michigan counterparts. In addi-
tion, the Michigan cities have a
comparatively limited land from
which to draw exports,.aside from
the Detroit industrial complex.'
The effects of labor shortages,
in the form of specialists in ex-
port packing, freight forwarders,
marine insurance brokers, cus-
toms services, and financial in-
spectors from foreign banks, is
yet to be seen.
Thus far, there has been little
Dumond To Speak
About Civil War
Prof. Dwight L. Dumond of the
history department, author of the
recently published book, "Anti-
Slavery," will describe "De Boys
who Fought in the Civil War" in
the speech assembly at 4 p.m. to-
day in Rackham Lecture Hall.
I ______________

trouble. However, as exports rise
to the probable maximum of 50
million short tons (forecasted for
1970) from the present 18 million
tons, difficulties may arise.
The capacity of the canal will
have an effect as this maximum
is approached, since ships carry-
ing perishable cargoes may be hurt
by the slowdowns, especially at the
Welland Canal. This will also in-
fluence the infrequency of sail-,
ings to far-off ports.
The trucking and railroad in-.
dustries are expected to react to
the Seaway with a slight reduc-
tion in prices ,on bulk rawma-
terials. This is accounted for the
fact that the ships, having a capa-
city of a maximum of 20,000 tons,
will stop only for shipments of
500 tons or more, the Conference
suggests,
Shipbuilders To Benefit
One industry which may bene-
fit is shipbuilding, a heretofore
landlocked operation. The Great;
Lakes shipyards. may now be able
to participate in military projects,
although this aspect of the Sea-
way has not yet been introduced,
possibly due to the higher cost of
labor in the Great Lakes states.
No matter how heavy Michigan
DUPLICATE
BRIDGE'
Every Tuesday Nite,
7:30 P.M.
VFW HOME-
314 E. Liberty
NO 2-3972
-80autI , vivid, strIkIng.N.Y. Times
"TremendOus
Impuctr'
"Y. Herald Tdbune
INDRANI
with Her Dancers
and Musicians. ,.
TEMPLE RHYTHMS OF INDIA
PIRST TRANSCONrtiNNTAL UR
Transportation fromI

producers are able to capitalize on
the Seaway, the complexion of
industry in the state will undergo
no substantial change.
It will produce only a slight in-
crease in its exports, which
amounted to approximately 2.5
per cent of the state's commercial
income in the 1960-61 fiscal year.
The Michigan Business Execu-
tives Research Congerence is spon-
sored by the Committee for Eco-
nomic Development and by the
business administration school.
Museum Sets
New Exhibit
A new exhibition of contempor-
ary painting, "Latin America-
New Departures" will be on dis-
.play at the University of Michigan
Museum of Art in Alumni Hall
from Oct. 13-Nov. ,12.
The exhibition was prepared by
the Institute of Contemporary Art,
Poston, with the assistance of
Time, Inc. and the Pan American
Union. Leading artists of Mexico,
Peru, Brazil, Nicaragua, Argen-
tina, Columbia, and Venezuela are
represented.
We are now
Delivering
fIZZA and SUBS

I
I

:I

DOM NI(K'S
NO 2-5414

i

presented by
INDIA STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Wednesday, Oct. 11
Ann Arbor H.S. AuditoriuM
- Tickets: $1.50 or $2.50
at International Center
Daily 8-8 P.M.
Union at 8 P.M., 25c

at the, door

PEOPLE OF CHELM will be here on Nov. 11, at

8:30 in Hill

Auditorium. They. will be enter-

taned by HILLELZAPOPPIN' SKITS presented
by independents, sororities and fraternities. Let's
all be on hand to welcome them. Remember
Hillelapoppin' Nov. 11 - See you there !

--4
4
4
-4
-4
-4
A
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- -,..__. w _.

lesday Nite-.
PROFESSOR KAUPER

"CONSTITUTIONAL LAW:
TODAY'S VITAL ISSUES"
8:00 FREE.
NEWMAN CLUB . . 331 .Thompson

Free Delivery

Free Delivery

Free Delivery

The Cottage Inn Pizzeria

USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizationsplanning to be active for
the Fall semester should register by
OCTOBER 10, 1961. Forms available,
3011 Student Activities Building. Ex-
ception to this procedure is subject, to
Student Government Council approval.
Chess Club, Meeting, Instruction for
- beginners, Lectures and matches for
strong players, Oct. 11, 7:30 p.m., Un-
ion, 3rd Floor. Everyone welcome.
s* * *
Circle, Meeting, Ensian pictures will
be taken-please wear -dark skirt and
sweater and white blazer, Oct. 11, 7:30
p.m., League, Henderson Rm.
German Club, Coffee Hour, German
Conversation & Music, -Oct. 12, 2-4
p.m., 4072 FB.
%Rifle Club, Meeting, ;Oct. 11, 7:30
p.m., ROTC Rifle Range. Snialibore
shooting.
Wesley Foundation, Class' on the
Christian Faith, Oct. 11, 7 p.m., Meth-
adist Church, Lounge.

FOLKLORE SOCIETY
Membership Meeting
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12
Room 3R-S 8:00 P.M. Michigan Union

E

LT"

r P-

I

and
The Brown Jug Restaurant
PIZZA Free Delvery PIZZA
Pizza delivered free in hot portable ovens.
Real Italian food is our specialty.
Cottage inn 3-5902 Brown Jug 8-98 19
2 E. Williams 1204 S. University
Free Delivery Free Delivery Free Delivery

nDIAL2-6264
ENDING FRIDAY *
~'Inspiring
Screen
SATURDAY
Walt Disney's
"GREYFRIAR'S BOBBY"

DIAL 8-64 16
ENDINGTHURSDAY
"it has dignity...humor..,
and genuine feeling...
niversa- in its unadorned appeal 1"
starting TOSHIRO MIFUNE
«-Unforsetiable Star of "Rasbomou'
Also lovely Hideko Takamine
Directed by Hiroshi Inagaki
Produced by Toho Co., Ltd.
In Toboscope add the most
Mfagnificent Color Photo graphy
ever to reach the screens!
FRIDAY
"OTHELLO"
IN COLOR

If you want to have
A SENIOR PORTRAIT
YOU MUST MAKE
AN APPOINTMENT

I

HOMECOMING
DANCE -
N
10/21 . .. 9:00 P.M.
$3.75 Per Couple

11

r

T

y

1A

I

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ENDING DIAL
THURSDAY NO 5-6290
Peter USTNOV
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER-sIURISu1INSA AM F0R"TAWC
SodraDEE John GAVIN

AT THE
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG.

TICKETS ON SALE

#,

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