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April 16, 1964 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-16

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is

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T]

THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA(3 T

1 [atAL iii

Khrushchev Lambasts

Castello Branco Takes
Oath of Office in Brazil
BRASILIA (P)-Humberto Castello Branco was sworn in as Bra-

RAILROAD CRISIS:
Mediators Fail To End Threat

Mao,

Widens Red Rift;

0.

WASHINGTON (P) - President

zil's new president yesterday and promptly hinted at a diplomatic Lyndon B. Johnson reported "no
break with Fidel Castro's Cuba. settlement yet" yesterday in the

China Forti~fies Border

Laying aside a long military career to tackle his country's press-
ing problems, the 63-year-old Castello Branco also promised that
"remedies for leftwing extremism will not give birth to a reactionary
right." Applause and cheers from a jammed chamber of deputies
greeted the 17-minute inaugural
address of the man behind the
April 1 uprising that sent Presi-R
dent Joao Goulart into exile.

i 1
Soviet Head
Gets Support
xOf Poland
Gomulka Ridicules
China's View of West
By The Associated Press
MOSCOW-Waving his arms in
anger, Premier Nikita Khrush-
chev said yesterday Red China now
preaches world revolution because
Mao Tze-tung and other leaders
bungled in trying to solve prob-
lems at home.
It was the first time, diplomats
said, that Khrushchev had made
an open attack on Mao personally.
Peking's policies "have created
serious difficulties for the world
Communist movement and placed
it on the verge of a split," he told
a'Polish-Soviet friendship meeting
in the Kremlin.
Cautious Support
The meeting was an encourag-
ing one for the premier. Wadyslaw
Gomulka, the visiting Polish party
leader, announced cautious support
for the Soviet call for a world
Communist showdown meeting on.
Red China. While backing Moscow,
Poland has been reported cool to-
ward a showdown meeting, fearing
an irreparable division of world
Communism.
Gomulka ridiculed the Chinese
for calling the West "a paper
tiger." He declared no "mperial-
ist" country is ripe for revolution,
as Peking contends, "least of all
the United States."
Scoffs at Aspirations
In his address, Khrushchev
scoffed at Red Chinese aspira-
tions for leadership of world Com-
munism. He said the Chinese
would like to "become the leaders
and mentors of the revolutionary
movement in Asia, Africa and Lat-
in America," but could offer only
revolution instead of economic
progress.
"They say we are the revision-
ists," Khrushchev said. "But I
ask, what do their people want-
war or rice? I think they want
rice."
The Soviet premier, who will
be 70 Friday, obviously was feeling
good as Communist leaders from
t all over the world began gather-
ing for the celebration-and for a
display of solidarity against the
Red Chinese.
The birthday will be celebrated
Friday, but so far there have been
no statements as to what form the
celebration will take.
The only announcements have
involved travel plans orarrivals.
Already in Moscow are these
party chiefs: Poland's Gomulka,
Czechoslovakia's Antonin Novot-
ony, Bulgaria's Todor Zhivkov,
Mongolia's Yumzhagin Tsedenbal,
and Hungary's Janos Kadar.
East German sources said their
party chief, Walter Ulbricht, is
arriving today.
No announcement has been
made whether anyone is coming
from Romania, which has been
showing some independence of
Moscow. However, a report from
Vienna said a Romanian party
delegation is expected to travel to
Moscow.
There has also been no word
from Peking.

Clear Zone

WLADYSLAW GOMULKA

World'News
LRoundup
By The Associated Press
MANILA-Seven of the South-
east Asia Treaty Organization's
eight members agreed yesterday
the alliance must be ready to act
in South Viet Nam if necessary to
keep that nation from falling to
the Communists. France, the
eighth member, abstained.
* * * ,
STOCKHOLM - A form of q
doctors' strike threatened Sweden
yesterday. Negotiations between
doctors and the Central County
Councils Federation bogged down
and the doctors, barred by law
from striking, threaten to resign
from 109 county hospitals, already
short of personnel.
* * *
NEW DELHI--The Indian gov-
ernment said yesterday it has
reasons to believe the Communist
Chinese were behind the assassina-
tion of Bhutan's Prime Minister
Jigme Dorji. But it said it is un-
able to go into details.

In Disputed
Territory
HONG KONG (P)-Red China
has sent substantial troop rein-
forcements to Sinkiang and has
cleared and fortified a belt 20
miles deep along hundreds of miles
of the disputed border with the
Soviet Union, White Russian refu-
gees said yesterday.
Accusations
They gave this picture: Rus-
sian broadcasts boast that some
Sinkiang border areas eventually
will be incorporated into the So-
viet Union. The Chinese denounce
Premier Nikita Khrushchev, call-
ing him "a good friend of the
Americans" who deceived China
by reneging on promises of So-
viet aid.
In their feud over the best road
to world Communism domination,
'Peking andhMoscow frequently
have lifted the curtain on .their
private cold war in Sinkiang.
The refugees came from Kuldja,
50 miles from the Soviet frontier,
where Moslem minorities revolted
and were bloodily suppressed on.
May 29, 1962. They gave this ac-
count, kept secret for the last
four years, of events leading up to
the bloodshed in Kuldja:
Soviet Indoctrination
Soviet consular and military
representatives in Kuldja had
worked for years on the Moslems,
indoctrinating them and urging
they go to the Soviet Union. Then'
in 1960, the Soviet consulate be-
gan distributing passports to all
Moslems.
A flood of Moslems began to
cross into the Soviet Union. There
were rumors in Kuldja that 500,-
000-600,000 crossed. Soviet sources
have put the figure somewhat
lower while Red China says 50,-
000.
The alarmed Chinese then de-'
cided to clamp down, and that ledj
to the rioting in Kuldja.j

Brazilian Support
Castello Branco said "all dem-
ocratic and free nations will be
our allies just as all those peo-
ple who desire to be free and
want representative democracy can
count on Brazil's support."
This was viewed as shifting Bra-
ziian policy toward a Western
li e.
The country followed an inde-
pendent line with the advent four
years ago of the Janio Quadros
regime-predecessor of Goulart's.
Since then Brazil established re-
lations with the Soviet Union and
was one of five Latin American
countries that continued to rec-
ognize Cuba.
Interim Government
Castello Branco, former army
chief of staff, will head an interim
government for 21 months. The
military leaders of the coup that
ousted Goulart have promised
elections for a new president in
October, 1965.
In Brasilia, nearly all the dip-
lomatic missions, including the So-
viet Union's and that of the Unit-
ed States, were on hand.
Most residents of Brasilia seem-
ed to take the proceedings with
only casual interest.
Informed officials were not in-
clined to place any political sig-
nificance of the lack of enthusiasm
in Brasilia, where Goulart had an
enthusiastic following.
'UJ' Scientists
Fire Missiles
University officials announced
the successful firings yesterday of
two rockets by University scien-
tists.
The shots were made in conjunc-
tion with a test firing of a mock
lunar-landing capsule by the Na-
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration.
The University rockets were de-
signed to measure pressure, tem-
peratures and air density over As-
cension Island in the Atlantic
Ocean off the coast of Africa.

LANSING (P) -

W. Romney's congressional dis-
tricting plan is set for its first
open test of House sentiment to-
day.
Romney believes it will succeed.
"From reaction registered to
date," Romney said, "I believe
there is sufficient likelihood of bi-
partisan support in the Legislature
to move on my proposal.
"There is not a certainty of
this support, but the possibility of
it." Romney said.
The remarks were in a letter
the Republican governor sent to
Democratic Lt. Gov. T. John Le-
sinski.
Lesinski Tuesday sent Romney
a districting proposal based on
"proportionate representa-
tion," meaning the total votes for
Democratic and Republican con-
gressmen.
Lesinski said Romney's popula-
tion-based plan was designed to
give Republicans a disproportion-
ate edge in Congress and maintai
the GOP's 11-8 superiority in con-
gressional seats.
Romney invited Lesinski to test
the Democratic plan in the Legis-
lature, but said the "principle of
proportionate representation" was
a new element in the district cris-
is.

Plan Faces
House Test

Gov. George'

railroad labor crisis.
But the President said he still
hopes for agreement before a na-
tionwide strike threat resumes at.
12:01 a.m. on April 25. Johnson
said labor and management nego-
tiators in five days of emergency
White House bargaining talks
"have narrowed the area of dif-
ference on some of the issues."
He said "intensive mediation"
will continue in the talks which
he arranged after obtaining a 15-
day strike postponement last Fri-
day.
A five-man team of mediators
headed by Secretary of Labor W.
Willard Wirtz is meeting contin-
uously- with the negotiators for
five unions and nearly 200 rail-
roads.r
Emergency Legislation?
The White House remained sil-
ent about the possibility of emer-
gency legislation if the talks fail.
but Johnson indicated he would
not elt the entire 15-day postpone-
ment expire before considering
other steps.
"I have' asked for a definitive
report to me by this weekend,"
the President said.
"We should know definitely, not
later than next Monday, whether
the parties to this dispute will
settle it by the process of bargain-
ing and by responsible reason,"
Johnson said.

Johnson noted the difficulty of
trying to gain in 15 days what five
years of talks and government ac-
tion have failed to achieve in the
dispute over wage structure, job
classifications, and working con-
ditions.
"The principal question is
whether these bargainers can, in
15 days, get over four years of the
idea of somebody else settling
their disagreements for them,"
Johnson said.
The bitter dispute, which has
led repeatedly to nationwide strike
threats, has exhausted all provi-
sions of present law.
Johnson received oral reports
from the mediators,'then met with

the union and industry negotiator
before making his comments in f
news briefing.
White House Press Secretar3
George Reedy said Johnson com
plimented both sides on their con
duct in the talks thus far an(
"stressed once again his deep de
sire" for a voluntary settlement
At his news briefing, Johnsor
said "both sides are trying thei
dead-level best to reach an agree
ment. I am convinced of that."
Reedy at a later briefing, de
clined to say whether Johnsor
might ask Congress for legisla
tion to settle the dispute if nec
essary as a last resort.
"The arena of operations of eacl
side would automatically be nar
rowed" by any such statemeni
Reedy said. "So far, there has beer
no threat of legislation."
Congress last year halted a sim
ilar nationwide strike threat an(
tried to provide machinery for
settlement through a combinatior
of compulsory arbitration and con
tinued negotiation between th
parties.
The arbitration ruling, involv
ing the elimination of thousands o:
jobs, is being appealed by the un
ions to the Supreme Court.
The issues which Congress lef
to negotiation resulted in the cur
rent crisis.They include propose(
railroad' changes in payt struc.
ture, which theunions say woulc
amount to heavy wage cuts, an
revised job classifications an
work rules that would eliminat
many more jobs.

W. WILLARD WIRTZ

"The country
swer to be yes."

expects that an-

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