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April 16, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

grTTTT'p 4.r.1"L A tr A bts rr ec 1'

... _ . .. a... c.. . v. I a YIla 1wT fL A J y.

Pn..rrrbAY .rAPIL.16, 1964

4',

RACIAL SITUATION:
HateherSpeaks at Tuskegee

People thought that discrimina-
tion was something that could
easily be combatted and win. Ef-
forts were made in universities to
do this.
"All references to race or color
were removed from applications.
They were removed from student
records. The doors were open to
all. Every facility was offered
without reservation," University
President Harlan Hatcher claimed
in his keynote speech at Tuskagee
Institute's Founder's Day Observ-
ance March 22.
Business, industry, colleges and
university faculties, were ready
and willing to welcome and employ
Negro, but found them generally
unqualified or too few in number,
he oontinued.
Negro ,college entrants were few
because of the lack of qualified
and motivated high school gradu-
ates.
Energetic Approach
"The University has turned with
vigor to.the task of increasing the
flow of Negro men and women into
the high schools, colleges and uni-
versities and from these institu-
tions in the professions and po-
sitions of leadership," he said.
Two factors create problems for
every institution of higher educa-
tion today. These are the popula-
tion growth and the growing public
recognition of the right of the
Negro people to equal opportuni-

Specific items of the plan al-
ready underway are two research
projects in the social sciences with
participation by both institutions.
Top Priority
"We are also giving high priority
(in our plan) to the development
of remedial programs for stu-
dents newly entering Tuskegee In-
stitute. Unfortunately, many able
young people who wish to come to
this distinguished institution have
not received adequate preparation
for college study in their elemen-
tary schools. The need is to pro-
vide short-term, intensive remedial
programs which will enable them
to study at the college level and
on an equal basis with students
whose preparation was more nearly
adequate, President Hatcher said.
"No miracle will relieve the
problems the Negro faces. It will
not suddenly be transformed. But
all barriers to opportunity must
be removed, here and now, to be-
gin the long butadventurous
journey inland from present
beachheads," he claimed.

Organize.
Language
'Study Unit
A new honorary organization,
aimed at interesting more stu-
dents in the Romance Languages,
will hold its first meeting tonight.
The group is the recently-
formed Sigma Iota chapter of Phi
Sigma Iota, a national Romance
Languages organization founded
in 1922. At the meeting, to be
held at 7:30 p.m. in the Rackham
Bldg., some 65 students will be in-
itiated, Martin Schwarz of the
Romance Languages department
said yesterday.
Prof. Charles Morehead of
Muskingum College will speak at
the ceremony.
"Anyone with a 'B' average who
is enrolled in a third-year course
in any of the Romance Languages
is eligible," he said. Students need
not be concentrates in the depart-
ment to join the group.
Monthly meetings, centering
around reading and discussion,
will be Phi Sigma Iota's major
activity, Schwarz said.

Campus
Hiram Sherman, actor of stage
and television and noted for his
performance in comic roles, will
speak on "The Clowns of Shake-
speare: An Actor's View" at 4:10
p.m. today in Kellogg Aud.
This is part of the University's
program commemorating Shake-
speare's 400th anniversary.
Cook ecture .. a
Prof. Theodore W. Schultz of
the University of Chicago will
speak on -"Welfare and Efficiency
of the Modern Agriculture" at
4:15 p.m. today in Rackham Aud.
Independence...
In observance of Israel Inde-
pendence -Day. Lt. Commander
Herzl Lavon of the Israeli Navy
wil give a brief talk at 8 p.m. to-
day at Hillel. Following his speech
the Nagila Dancers will give a per-
formance.
Spring Concert..
The Uiversity Symphony Or-
chestra under the direction of
Prof. Joseph Blatt of the music
school will present its annual
Spring Concert at 8:30 p.m. today
in Hill Aud.,
The program will feature com-
positions by Schumann, Bartok,
Smetama and, Dukas.
Teaching...
Mrs. Daniel H. Trevitt, three
time winner of the Freedom's
Foundation National Award for
her teaching of the American
Heritage, will describe her pro-
gram at 7:30 p.m. today in the
Conference and Testing Rm. of
Ann Arbor, City. Hall.

PRESIDENT HARLAN HATCHER
ties in all areas of life, especially
education.
The Michigan-Tuskegee mutual
enrichment of teaching program is
an attempt to help Negroes attain
their rights.
Faculty Development
This plan hopes to enrich the
programs at both institutions. It
covers such areas as faculty, stu-
dent and program development.
Plans to increase faculty devel-
Jpment cover an exchange of
teachers between the University
and Tuskegee institutions, addi-
tional graduate training for Tus-
kegee faculty, consultations be-
tween University and Tuskegee
faculty members in the same dis-
cipines, and appointment of people
,,ho are willing to teach at both
institutions.
Another area of emphasis has
been student development. includ-
ed here are programs of cultural
exchange such as the recent con-
cert by the Tuskegee Choir on the
University campus. It is hoped
that in the future exchange pro-
grams in fields of drama, art and
other cultural media.
A third area of general coopera-
tion will be that of research on
problems of mutual interest.
Among these are the emerging
role of the Negro in American life,
the motivation and outlook of
youth with long deprived family
backgrounds, and the discovery
and nurturing of intellectual abil-
ity at an early age,

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
36x4 Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday.
THURSDAY, APRIL 16
Day Calendar
School of Public Health Organized
Home Care Conference--School of Pub-
lic Health, 9 a.m.
Near Eastern Center and Museum of
Anthropology Lecture - Jean Perrot,
member, French Archaeological Mission
in Israel, "From Cave to village Life
in Palestine": Aud. B, Angell Hall, 4:10
p.m.
Dept. of Romance Languages Lecture
-Stephen Gilman, Prof. of Spanish Lit-
erature, Harvard, Univ., "Don Quixote
and the Invention of the Novel": Aud.
C, Angell Hall, 4:10 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Thomas Mann's "Bud-
denbrooks," Part II; plus short, t'Bosch
-Three Paintings": Architecture Aud.,
7 p.m. and 9 p.m.
American Chemical Societl Lecture-
"Chemistry of Fused Salts," Prof. E.
R. van Artsdalen, Univ. of Virginia,
8 p.m., Room 1300 Chemistry Bldg.
Applied Mathematics Seminar - Dr.
Harry Moses, Lincoln Lab., will speak
on "The Transformation of the Angular
Momentum of Relativistic Patricles in
Quantum Mechanics under Transla-
tions of Frames of Reference," at 4 p.m.
in Room 246 W. Engrg.
Botany Seminar-Dr. Leslie Mapson,
Low Temperature Research Station,
Cambridge, England, "Ascorbic Acid and
the Photosynthetic Electron Transport
Chain," at 4:15 p.m., 1139 Natural Sci-
ence Bldg.
Astronomical Colloquium-4 p.m., m.
807, Physics-Astronomy Bldg. Dr. W.
S. Benedict, Applied Physics Laboratory,
The Johns Hopkins Univ., will speak
on "Finding H20 in the Stars."
Doctoral Examination for James Ed-
ward Dammann, Communication Sci-
ences; thesis: "Studies in the Applica-
tion of Adaptive Threshold Devices to
the Recognition of Acoustic-Phonetic
States," 166 FriezeBldg., at 2 p.m.
Chairman, G. E. Peterson.
Doctoral Examination for Jack Mar-
tin Balcer, History; thesis: "From Con-
federate Freedom to Imperial Tyranny:
A Study of the Restrictions Imposed
by Athens on the Political Self-De-
termination of the Member States in
the Delian Confederacy. 478-431 B.C.,"
3609 Haven Hall, atr10:15 a.m. Chair-
man, P. J. Alexander.
General Notices
The Office of Student Affairs an-
nounces there will be a 1:30 late per-
mission for Fri., April 17, 1964.
French and German Screening Exams:
The screening exams in French and Ger-
man for Doctoral candidates will be ad-

ministered on Mon., April 20 from 3-5
p.m. in Aud. B, Angell Hall. Doctoral
candidates must pass the screening
examination before taking the written
test in French or German, unless they
have received B or better in French 111
or German 111. Any candidate who fails
the April exam may not attempt it until
June.
Law School Admission Test: Candi-
dates who are registered to take the
Law School Admission Test on April
18 are asked to report to 130 Business
Admin. Bldg. on Sat. morning at 8:30
a.m.
May Festival Ushers: The following
persons have been selected as ushers
for the 1964 May Festival and may
pick up their usher tickets at the box
office of Hill Aud. from 5 p.m. to 6
p m. on Thurs., April 16 or Fri., April
17.
Mahyar Ankelsaria, Carol Allyn, Steve
Aaron, Bruce Apple,
Robin Bindermann, Marcia Baker,
Carol Blumquist, Edward S. Bros, 3rd,
Sara Barber, Rhonda Bartsch, Mary
Barth, Mary Love Brown, Barbara Lee
Bennett, Aletta Biersack, Emily Brink,
Marsha Bellman, Maria Bahas, Davil
Buresh, Paul Bendsza, Barton Bartle,
Joan Bennett, Henry Bierling,
Barbara Conta, Rosemary Cook, Jenni-
fer Clarke, Bee Cronin, Margaret Cwie-
ka, Carolyn Cole, Phyllis Carp, Lynn Co-
hodas, Jane Clifford, Mary Cockran,
Helen Cywinski, Dominick Cardella, Jef-
fery Chase, Gene Chapp, Gordon Cor-
zine,
Louise Duesing, Kathy Donaldson,
Kathy Donato, Doris Dorn, Terry Drell,
Linda Dehlquist, Joyce Dubow, Mary De
Lano, Carol Dick, Dorothy de Ferranti,
Erma H. Donner, Jon Dombrowski, Wil-
liam Dirlam; Robert Durgy,
Wendy Einfeldt, Marileen Erickson,
Emily Erickson, Carolyn Ervin, Elaine
Edmunds,
Kathy Fodroscy, Janet Freiswyck,
Janet Fischman, Gail/ Feldman, Alice
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

Falkin, Debbie Farr, Harvey Frumin,
Sam Fohr,
Nancy Goldner, Jane Golden, Jane
Goldberg, Susan Glowacki, Tina Gard-
ner, Marge Gliessman, Wynne Goldstein,
Margaret Gordon, Sandra Gibbs, Steph-
en Gainer,
Jane Hoppe, Linnea Hendrickson, El-
lenn Hydorn, Ellen K. Hinterman, Don-
na Helmkamp, Sue Hubley, Sue Hig-
ginbottom, Sara Hoopengardner, Janice
M. Hulka, Jan Heinrich, Donna Hard-
acre, Susan Hubbard, Jack Horner, Jo-
seph Herter, Eric Hoberg, Don B.
Haber, Peter N. Heydon,
Anita Jackson, Nora Jarvi, Sue Jung-
reis, aKthryn Jarvis, George K. Jarvis,
Anne Jarvi, Luanna Jensen, Marcia
Jones, Susan Jiga, Ron Jeffers,
Sue Kinde, Salli Kimberly, Kip Klein,
Jane Kenyish, Steve Kalkstein, Paul
King, Karl Kish,
Vicki Lasser, Fran Lasser, Diana Lit-
tlejohn, Lois Ann Levitt, Karen Lossing,'
Duth Lundvall, Margaret Lee, Nancy
Lehnert, Allen La Rue, Ann Langhaug,
Lois La Pointe, Marge Lowe, Judy Lud-
wig, James Levitt, Jeff Lane,
Joan Multhaup, Judy Meyers, Naomi
Margolis, Karen Margolis, Sylvia Mas-
kin, Daryle Marjaniemi, Karen Meier,
Bonnie McDowell, Peggy _MacMurray,
Sarah Mhaler, Allen Moore, R. Jean
Musser, Mary Madden, Baudouin de
Marcken, Tom McCarty, David Miles,
Ronnie Newman, Ann Nutme,
Jean Pence, Cynthia Parry, Belinda
Phillips, Kenneth Phillips, Candi Pat-
terson, Jackie Plamondon, Pat Parker,
Elin Panzar, Natalie Pavlovich, Bettie
Pfiffner, Ross Piper, Margaret Piper,

Richard Pettit, John H. Payne, Charles
Poposki, David P. Poff, Robert Phil-
lips, Robert Probasco,
Leta Rubin, Carole Roberts, Karen
Reider, Bonnie Roeber, Thomas Ransen-
berger,
Masako Sano, Sandra Sandweiss, Lynn
Shapiro. Stephen Schlakman, Golda
Shkolnick, Paula Schreiber, Susanna
Steltzer, Ruth Segall, Sabra Sullivan,
Ruth Ann Swanson, Carolyn Sfhamroth,
Carol Spooner, Virginia Sherwood, John
Schmidt, Susan Schmidt, Patricia Stock-
ing, Lois Short, Barbara Starr, Grace
Saefke, Janette Stein, Nancy Stein, Bon-
nie Spepp, Irene Steltzer, Jean Smith,
Leo Settler, Larry R. Sobel,
Joan Terpstra, Nancy Marie Temple,
Janeen Trisler, Barbara Trist, Lucinda
Thompson, Ron Talley, Jack W. Taylor,
Joan Wertheim, Ruth Warheit, Susan
Winne, Ingrid Willeke, H. Ethelyn Wil-
liams, Karen Witbeck, Nancy Wasser-
man, Ellen Wurman, Marian oWertz,
Julia ard, Lynn Winter, Rebecca West,
Ann Zabawa, Jane Zehnder.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time Sobs are avail-
able. Application for these jobs can be
made in the Part-Time Employment Of-
fice, 2200 Student Activities Bldg., dur
ing the following hours: Mon. thru
Fri,. 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til 5
p.m.
(Continued on Page 8)

A

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4

Alternate U'Calendars
EDITOR'S NOTE: Last year, the Regents approved a two-and-one
half term calendar for the 1964-65 academic year. However, at their
February meeting this year, the Regents adopted a new three-term
schedule which will supersede the other calendar if the Legisla-
ture provides' the University with sufficient funds. Currently, the
Senaterhas approved a $44 million appropriation, which-unless the
House cuts it-wiul put the University on the three-term schedule.

j "CNCERT nlJAZZ"
April 19'... 7:00 P.M. .J
Union Ballroom
0 1 ) U of M Jazz Band
2) Clarence Byrd Trio
3) Richard Lowenthal Quartet
UNION SPONSORED 50c Admission
' r O ' 1c

p

Fall Term .
Orientation begins
Registration begins
Classes begin
Labor Day holiday
Thanksgiving recess 5 p.m.
Classes resume
Classes end
Study day
Examinations begin
Examinations end
Graduation
Summer Term ..,.
Orientation begins
Registration begins
Classes begin
Recess begins 5 p.m .

2 -Term Calendar 3-Term Calendar

Mon. Aug. 24'
Wed. Aug. 26
Mon. Aug. 31
Mon. Sept. 7
Wed. Nov. 25
Mon. Nov. 30
Mon. Dec. 14
Tues. Dec. 15
Wed. Dec. 16
Sat. Dec. 19
Tues. Dec. 22

Mon. Aug. 24
Wed. Aug. 26
Mon. Aug. 31
Mon. Sept. 7
Wed. Nov. 25
Mon. Nov. 30
Mon. Dec. 14
Tues. Dec. 15
Wed. Dec. 16
Tues. Dec. 22
Sat. Dec. 19
Mon. Jan. 4

Alpha Phi Omega, Pledge class me
ing, Thurs., April 16, 4 p.m., 3524 SAB
Le Cercie Farncais, Le Baratin, le
Avril, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Le Cercle Francais invites one and
to its annual banquet being held Al
19 at the Ann Arbor Community Cen
625 N. Main St. This dinner will
followed by an amusing program
imitations and music. Tickets are
sale at the office of the Department
Romance Languages.
* * *
Michigan Christian Fellowship,L
ture: "Why Not Have Free Love?"
Dr. Pattison, M.D., Univ. of Cincinn
April 17, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Uni
Third Floor.
Michigras, Michigras Tickets P
Sale, April 15 to 17, 9 a.m. to 3 p.
Michigan Union and the Diag.
* * *
University of Michigan Tennis Cl
Meeting-weather permitting, April
1 p.m., front door of I-M Bldg. on
Hoover.

eet.
3.
16
all
pril
tter,

I

Mon. Jan. 11
Wed. Jan. 13
Mon. Jan. 18
Sat. Mar. 20 (noon)

I

Mon. Jan. 4
Thu. Jan. 7
Thu. Mar. 4

Festival Plans
Showing of
Award Films
Eight films will be presented in
the Architecture Aud. this week as
part of the Second Ann Arbor
Film Festival.
The films shown will include
some which have won awards at
other world film festivals.
The festival, co-sponsored by
the University Cinema Guild and,,
the Ann Arbor Dramatic Arts
Center, offers $1,200 dollars in
prizes in an attempt to "encourage
the work of independent film-
makers and promote the concept
of film as art."
Awarding prizes will be a Jury
and selectionrcommittee headed
by Miss Pauline Kael, noted film
critic.
Miss Kael will also give an in-
troductory address on the current
renaissance of the independently
produced experimental film at 7
p.m. today. This talk will be the
first of the festival's films.

Classes resume Mon. Mar. 29 Mon. Mar. 8
Classes end Thu. May 6 Sat. Apr. 17
Study day Fri. May 7 Mon. Apr. 19
Examinations begin Mon. May 10 Tues. Apr. 20
Examinations end Sat. May 15 Tues. Apr. 27
Commencement Sat. May 22 Sat. May 1
Spring Term ..
Orientation-Registration None Mon. May 3
Classes begin None Wed. May 5
Memorial Day holiday None Mon. May 31
Spring half-term ends None Sat. June 26
Summer half-term begins Mon. June 21 Mon. June 28
July 4th holiday Mon. July 5 Mon. July 5
Summer half-term ends Sat. Aug. 14 Wed. Aug. 18

Gil1more's
FOR GOOD FOOD
OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY

for
tof
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
eC- Depart ment of Speech
byee
ati, r
ion, resents
?re- s
ub,
18
COMING NEXT WEEK
Wednesday thrugh Saturday
Trueblood Auditoriuln
BOX OFFICE OPENS MONDAY

ft

STUDENTS and FACULTY

1201 South University
(corner of Church)

Dial 662-8871 for

Gihena quild
Program Information

0

PeDent the
SECOND ANN ARBOR

'4

Wdquette

"

Fashion

Show

and
Wedding Gift
Displays
Refreshments Served

HELD OVER!
Dial 5-6290

Shows at
1, 3, 5,
7 and 9:05 P.M.

FILM FESTIVAL

C

I

SPECIAL
SATURDAY MATINEE
FOR ROMANOFF & JULIET
SAVES AD WRITER
Imagine an ad writer with noth-
ing to write about. Horrible
thought, isn't it?
You can imagine how terrible our
copywriter felt when we told him
ROMANOFF & JULIET was al-
most sold out even before he wrote
a single ad.
He cried.
Well, we had to do something so
we arranged a Special Saturday
Matinee at 2 p.m.-April 18-
with all seats reserved for only
$1.50. It gave him something to
write about.
He smiled. We think we pre-
vented a suicide. The human
thing to do, of course.
So make him think it is all worth

Dial 2-6264
WINNER OF 4
ACADEMY AWARDS!
including
BEST PICTURE
and
BEST DIRECTOR
"BEST COMEDY
EVER MADE!"
-Newsweek

"A BRILLIANT PICTURE, NOT TO BE MISSED!"
--Hugh Holland, Michigan Daily
Peter Sellers *George C. Scottg
t' .' StanleyKubrick's
7Dr. Strangelove h'
Or. How I Learned To Stop Worrying
IiijillliAnd Love The Bomb '
the hot-line suspense comedy

I

APRIL 16, 7:00 P.M.
PAULINE KAEL, Guest Film Critic and
Awards Judge, will give a talk on
the Experimental Film. Admission
to Miss Kael's talk is complementary
APRIL 16,9:00 P.M.
RENASCENT by Madeline Tourtelot
WATERSCAPE by Richard Forstmann
THE ALLERGIST by Carl Linder
LA VIE DE LE PEINTRE by
Harold Crowley
ON SUNDAYS by Bruce Baillie
WINDWARD SHORE by The
Canadian Broadcasting Corp.
PLASTIC HAIRCUT by Robert Nelson
APRIL 17, 7:00 P.M.
FISH MARKET by Michael Eisler
TOTEM by Ed Emshwiler
IT'S HARRY FINK AND APPLEBAUM
AND WEISS by Harold Crowley
A LA MODE by Stan Vanderbeek
MY MAY by George Manupelli

APRIL 18, 7:00 P.M.

THE IMAGE IN TIME by
George Manupelli
DISSENT ILLUSION by Millie Goldsholl
URSULA by Lloyd Michael Williams
AN INTERIOR by Abbott Meader
SCRAMBLES by Ed Emshwiller
MASS by Bruce Boillie
APRIL 18,9:00 P.M.
CONCERTO FLAMENCO by
Maurice Amar
LEMON HEARTS by
Vernon Zimmerman
PEERS by Peter Dart
BREATH-DEATH by Stan Vanderbeek
FIVE SHORT FILMS by
George Manupelli
TO PARSIFAL by Bruce Baillie
FIRST TIME HERE by Richard Myers
APRIL 19 7:00 P.M.
BEARDED SN!OW by Byron Goto
WHAT DO YOU DO HERE by
Gordon Townsend
PUPPET'S DREAM by Pyramid
Film Producers
SCARFACE AND APHRODITE by
Vernon Zimmerman
SHOOT THE MOON by Red Grooms
and Rudolph Burkhardt
SCORPlO RISING by Kenneth Anger

PROGRAM

: K}'
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4

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NOW !

M-mCAMPUS

DIAL
8-6416

APRIL 17,9:00 P.M.
OLEAN by Charles Swedlund
WAITING SERVANT by Robert Rose
BY THE SEA by Robert Abel and
Pat O'Neill
THREE DANCES by
Eugene L. Friedman
RIVER by Pyramid Film Producers
A AM mI IR IE LUMO IRACvS

?he whole

APRIL 19,9:00 P.M. ANN
Late Arrivals A RBOR
Annuncement and noieat hoinas of

I U .~ . __________

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