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October 05, 1960 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-05

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UNESDA , OCTOBER 5, 1960

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

)NESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1960 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAG.

1Canaveral Base Launches
Magnetic Brain Satellite SLTI-SANVRAY
SPUTNIK'S ANNIVERSARY:
U.S. Air Force Tests
Versatile Scout Rocket

WASHINGTON (P)-The United
States yesterday described as a
complete success the test flight of
a Scout rocket designed to serve
as a relatively inexpensive yet ver-
satile vehicle for a variety of
space-exploring missions.
The 72-foot tall rocket soared
3,500 miles high and 5,800 miles
out over the Atlantic on a '79-
minute arching flight that ended
in the ocean or in fiery destruc-
tion in the atmosphere between
South America and Africa, It was
launched from the Wallops Island,
Va. station of the National Aero-
nautics and Space Administration.
Although the test was designed
primarily to test the performance
and structural strength of the
rocket itself, the vehicle carried
special Air Force experimental ra-
diation measuring equipment.

-
The 36,600-pound Scout was de-
scribed by NASA officials as the
world's first known example of a
four-stage, all-solid fuel rocket to
be launched successfully.
Several hours after the launch-
ing, Vincent L. Johnson of NASA
told reporters the significance of
yesterday's shot is that:
1) It opens the way to using
Scout vericles for certain orbital
or space-probe jobs which would
otherwise necessitate the use of
larger more expensive rockets.
2) Because the Scout is a solid
fuel rocket, it can be launched
from a variety of launching sites
-instead of being restricted to
Cape Canaveral and Vandenberg
Air Force Base as are the larger
rockets employing liquid fuel in
some stages.

Candidates
Argue Cost
Of Program
By The Associated Press
Vice President Richard M. Nix-
on and Sen. John F. Kennedy ar-
gued yesterday at long range about
which of the two, if elected Pres-
ident, would cost the voters more
money..
Nixon, the Republican nominee,
charged that the farm proposals
of Kennedy, the Democratic can-
didate, would raise the country's
grocery bills by 25 per cent.
Kennedy said that under the
last eight years of Republican rule
the Federal government has oper-
ated at an .18 billion deficit. This,
he said, shows the GOP is the
party of waste and not the Dem-
ocrats.
The Democratic nominee assail-
ed the GOP in a fund-raising
speech in Indianapolis, opening
his campaign invasion of Indiana,
where aides say they believe he
has an uphill fight. Kennedy took
things easy during most of yes-
terday but he jumps back on the
trail today through Indiana-
Muncie, Terre Haute, Evansville
and Anderson.
To New Jersey
Nixon campaigned yesterday in
populous, industrial New Jersey.
Today he goes to New York City
and Philadelphia.
In West Orange, Nixon raised
questions about Kennedy's farm.
proposal. He said this is what
would happen if his Democratic
opponent's "farm program for
planned scarcity" were adopted:
"For every quart of milk you
would pay almost 6 cents more.
For a dozen eggs you would pay
28 cents more. For chicken you
would pay about 22 cents a pound
more. For pork you would pay
about 23 cents a pound more. For
choice beef you would pay about
15 cents a pound more. For every
loaf of bread you would pay about

HAVANA P)--Roman Catholic
opposition to the leftward lunge of
Prime Minister Fidel Castro's gov-
ernment mounted yesterday with
the appearance of another pas-
toral letter accusing the nation's
Communists of trying to destroy
Catholic influence by leaps and
bounds.
The letter, ordered read Sep-
tember 24 in all the churches of
Oriente Province, was signed by
Assay Mood
syOf Africans
By ENDRE MARTON
Associated Press Staff Writer
UNITED NATIONS - The
United States is carefully watching
the attitude - and also the mood
- of delegates representing the
15 new, African members at the
United Nations.
Their number will be 16 soon.
Nigeria, the most populous country
of the coitinent, achieved full
sovereignty Oct. 1 and is expected
to become a UN member this week.
All 16 nations represent sub-
Saharan Africa.
The chairs in the General As-
sembly assigned to one of the 15
- The Congo - are still empty
-- and will probably remain so for
some time.
United States observers are
maintaining informal contacts
with all new delegations to sound
out their thinking on world prob-
lems.
The Americans are assisted in
their efforts by Commonwealth
representatives, many of them
having great experience in affairs
of-the black continent.
The two groups more or less
agree on these main points:
1. The sub-Saharan nations do
not form a solid group and the
chances of setting up such a mon-
lithic formation in the foreseeable
future are almost nonexistent,
2. No present African political
figure can claim to have an un-
disputed leading role in the non-
Arab part of the continent.
3. There is no immediate reason
to be alarmed by the possibility
that the Soviets will succeed in
herding these nations into their
orbit.
4. A surprisingly large number
of African leaders now attending
the General Assembly frankly
admit that they are not yet
familiar with the great issues on
the agenda.

CUBAN ARCHBISHOP:
Demands Rights for Catholics

the Rev. Msgr. Enrique Ferez Ser-
antes, Archbishop of Santiago,
who demanded that Catholics and
non-Communists be guaranteed
their full rights. It accused Com-
munists of defiling phurches by
pretending to defend interests
never violated by Catholics.
While fighting for the revolu-
tion, the letter said, "the Cuban
people never thought the iron hand
of communism would hang threat-
eningly over our heads nor that
a few devotees of Marx and Lenin
would pretend to take away the
well won laurel of victory nor
set the standard of conduct for
the heroic volunteers of our na-
tion going as far as ordering us
to confine ourselves to temples."
Leaps and Bounds
The letter said it is clear that
Communists propose to destroy
Catholic influence in Cuba not
step by step, but by leaps and
bounds.
Bishop Ferez Serantes said his
demand for full rights for Cath-

-AP Wirephoto
TALKING SATELLITE-This 500-lb. Courier Satellite, success-
fully orbited yesterday, can transmit and receive 340,000 words in
a five-minute pass over a tracking station.
Call 'Courier I' Forerunner
Of Communications Setup

2 cents more."
Total
Not only that,

Cost
Nonad but

Ji
71

11

later the Defense Department re-
ported the new space messenger
was zipping about the earth every
105 minutes in an orbit ranging
from 500 to 750 miles above the
surface.
Packed into the satellite were
300 pounds of electronic gear de-
signed primarily to receive and
record high speed teletypewriter
messages and transmit them on
command to ground stations.
The satellite also is capable of
voice transmission and instantane-
ous relay of messages between
stations.
A recorded voice message from
Secretary of the Army Wilber M.
Brucker went up in the sphere.
This congratulatory message was
to be beamed to the ground on
one of the satellite's early passes.
Five magnetic tape recorders in
the space package are geared
simultaneously to send and receive
68,000 words a minute.
The United States success came
on the third anniversary of the
day Russia ushered in the space
age by launching Sputnik I into
orbit.
Siuplus Funds
Lessen, Says
Administration
WASHINGTON Ti-The Eisen-
hower Administration lowered its
sights yesterday on the prospect
of a treasury surplus.
But it kept them up on the
business outlook for at least the
next nine months.
In a report bound to set off
election campaign repercussions,
the administration cut its estimate
on how much government income
will exceed outgo in the current
fiscal year by nearly 75 per cent.
Budget director Maurice H.
Stans said receipts will be $2.5
billion less and spending $600 mil-
lion greater than anticipated.

the total cost of living would go
up 6 per cent, meat would be
scarce, a million people serving
farmers and their products would
be thrown out of work, and farm-
ers "would be driven off farms
in shocking numbers."
The GOP nominee said his an-
alysis of Kennedy's farm program
Backs Ike
INDIANAPOLIS UP) - Sen.
John F. Kennedy yesterday en-
dorsed President Eisenhower's
refusal to meet with Russian
Premier Nikita Khrushchev at
the United Nations General
Assembly session.
The Democratic presidential
nominee said on a television
quiz show that he believes
Eisenhower "showed his judge-
ment" in taking this position.
was prepared by "career farm and
food experts." He did not further
identify them in his prepared re-
marks.
In earlier speeches during the
day Nixon said wage earners have
had\ a 15 per cent increase in in-
come under the Republicans as
against a 2 per cent gain under
the Democrats.
Accuses Administration
Kennedy, in accusing the Re-
publican administration of being
the party of waste, said most
deficit spending has gone for for-
eign aid, agriculture and defense.
Yet, he said, the foreign aid budg-
et has been managed in such a
way that "our prestige has rapid-
ly declined," the income of the
farmer is the lowest in 20 years,
and "our defenses are in danger
of becoming second-rate.
CARLOS
MONTOYA
Ann Arbor High
Fri., Oct. 7
8:30 P.M.

F
41
l

Tickets $3.50 - $2.75
$2.25 - $1.75 (tax mcl.)

T

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are flattering!
NO APPOINTMENTS NEEDED
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DASCOLA BARBERS
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NATIONAL BUSINESS WOMEN'S WEEK

WE SALUTE BUSINESS WOMEN
WITH
CareeP Ci'e4
WITH A GREAT FASHION FUTURE
To the business woman has fallen the honor of
upholding America's fine Fashion Tradition.
Millions look to her to see what the world should
be wearing. Therefore, it is with pride that we
are displaying her proven preferences-in smart
coats, suits, dresses, and accessories-that fit
her busy life and budget.

9 -,
,
~
Illustrated Left-
Perfect for office or
for the career
J bound college gal,
this slender plaid
sheath of Zefran
and wool. Brown
and gray. Junior
Sizes
at 14.95
by Mindy Ross
from our
Second Floor Dept.

The bandstand skirt
...newest fashion rage
we've seen in many a.
campus season! The
knee-skimming skirt
in a wool/nylon multi-
color plaid, with its
own cotton roll sleeve
shirt. Sizes 8 to 14.
14.98 the set

I

Tiny 7's to 15
Average 8-20

Tall 10-18

Shorter 101/2-241/2

at..', '
%f,;'
f/f
> 1 "6,,
f *, /'
.7/ l\X X V,
fIff I

Business women for years have known the feeling
of good grooming by shopping

I

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