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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 05, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER

A

TWO

iCEIVES U.S. GRANT:
Mednick to Investigate. Creative Theory'

The University has been award-
I a federal grant to support a
free-year study on "The Associ-
e Basis of the Creative Process,"
awrence G. Derthick, United
tate8 commissioner of education,
rnounced yesterday.
The grant, totalling $91,562, was
lade by the Cooperative Research
ranch of the United States Of-
ee of Education.
Prof. Sarnoff A. Mednick,'of the
The fabulous
SHELLEY
BERMAN
ANN ARBOR HIGH
Wed., Oct. 12-8:30 p.m.

University psychology department,
and Martha T. Mednick, research
associate in the Institute for So-
cial Research, will direct the
study.

I

Employs Theory
Prof. Mednick said that the
study will use his associative
theory to develop tests for creativ-
ity at the high school and college
level, adding that the tests might
be used to provide an additional
I CARLOS

Ann Arbor High
Fri., Oct. 7
8:30 P.M.

.........

m

11

basis for selecting students for
college entrance.
"There is a general discontent
in universities with selecting stu-
dents just on the basis of high
school grades," he said.
Prof. Robert C. Angell, of the
sociology department, said that
such a discontent exists at the
University, although "we do select
our students on other bases in ad-
dition to grades, such as various
test scores."
No Creativity Measure
However, he pointed out, the
ordinary tests do not measure cre-
ativity.
He said that he and several of
his students had taken Prof. Med-
nick's tests, and that work in the
area of accurately measuring cre-
ativity is "an important thing."
"If he comes up with anything,
we should certainly use it," he
said.
Testing research is being con-
ducted at Ann Arbor High School,
and the University Survey Re-
U of M Folklore Society
Old-Timey
FOLK MUSIC
with
MIKE
SEEGER
only 90c
UNION BALLROOM
Fri., Oct. 14, 8:301
Tickets: Union Disc Shop

search Center will aid in getting
nationally representative norms at
the high school level.
Charles Jung, Grad., will be the
prencipal research assistant for
the project, Prof. Mednick said.
University students Linda Golden,
'63, Ruth Mellen, '62, Zona Schei-
ner, '62 and Virginia Kuski, '62,
will assist with the project.
Stowe to Speak
On Nasser's Role
Under the auspices of the
journalism department, Prof. Le-
land Stowe will present a lecture
at 4:15 today in the Rackham
Amphitheatre on the subject of
"Nasser Between East and West:
His Communist Bloc Deception --
His Growth and Evolution.
This is the second lecture in a
two-part series entitled "What we
need to know about Nasser." The
lectures are based upon three
months of research in the Middle
East which Prof. Stowe recently
completed.

Lewis Given
City Council
Appointnent
The City Council re-appointed
Vice-President for Student Affairs
James A. Lewis to the city Human,
Relations Commission, of which
he had been a charter member,
Monday night.
Lewis' term as a charter mem-
ber began in 1957 and expired
last May, and he was not re-
appointed at that time. Monday
night he was named to complete
the term of Dr. Ralph M. Gibson
of the Michigan Program for
Mentally Retarded Children, Pe-
diatrics and Communicable Dis-
eases. The term will expire in
May, 1962,
Dr. Gibson resigned early in the
summer, stating that other duties
precluded further work on the
commission, Mayor Cecil O. Creal,
who submitted Lewis' name for
council approval, explained.
Of his new appointment, Lewis
commented, "There's work to be
done, and if I can help, I'm glad
to do it."
The members of the commission
are "all happy" with Lewis' ap-
pointment, Dr. H. Vaughn Whited,
chairman, said. "We feel he's a
good man, with a pulse on the
situation. His contributions are
always welcome."

By MICHAEL OLINICK
The University's Flint Senior
College opened its fifth year last
month with a record enrollment
and plans for future development.
"We must keep our growth equal
to our responsibility," Dean Da-
vid M. French said yesterday. This
need will be translated into an in-
creased budget request from the
state, he explained.
The Flint branch is a school for
juniors and seniors, offering pro-
grams in liberal arts and sciences,
business administration, a n d
teacher education. There are 461
candidates for the bachelor's de-
gree and 20 non-degree students
enrolled at the college.
The faculty, which increased by
one since last year, numbers about
30 members. "Our growth is going
to be in this area," French said.
"We need to increase the teaching
staff."
The first integral part of the
University outside of Ann Arbor
which offered a University degree,
Flint College was established in
1955 by a unanimous vote of the
Regents. Nearly a decade before,
former University President Alex-
ander Ruthven germinated the
idea for it when he predicted that

ENTERS FIFTH YEAR:
Flint Senior College
Plans New Expansion

CHALLENGE
MASS MEETING

the time was coming when the
University would have to begin,
establishing branches off-campus.
For a time the senior college
shared classrooms and facilities
with the Flint Junior College.
The senior college now has its
own building, largely the gift of
Flint philanthropist Charles S.
Mott who donated a million dol-
lars for the structure. The Com-
mittee of Sponsors of the Flint
College and Cultural Development
Program, a community group,
raised an additional $150,000 to
furnish equipment for the build-
ing.

Danish Ballet
Sets Detroit
Presentation
The Royal Danish Ballet will
appear at 8:20 p.m. Friday, and
at 2:20 p.m. and 8:20 p.m. Satur-
day, at the Masonic Temple Aud.
in Detroit.
Featured in the coming perfor-
mance will be both classical and
contemporary ballets. Classical
works will include "Whimsy of
Cupid" and "Coppelia," lanced
in their original form.
The group, with its 200-year
history, is the oldest ballet theater
in existence. The current tour the
130-member ballet company is
making is the third which it has
made outside of Denmark.

1 .1

Ciqepfta jIWdBd
presents

Thursday 4:15

Union

I

I

PICNIC

Thursday and Friday

Few critics were able to agree
about what was merit and what
defect in Joshua Logan's film
rendition of William Inge's Pic-a
nic. While one critic praised the
film's delicate realism, another
found it loose and lavish. One
said that Rosalind Russell
should win an Academy Award,
another that her acting was
heavy-handed and thus out of
keeping with the subtle flavor
of the film. Some felt it had
received too much praise, oth-
ers not enough. But only one
felt it was not worth taking se-
riously.
Picnic might be interpreted as
the story of day-dreams real-
Ized. When Hal Carter (William
Holden), a driftel and braggart,
arrives in a small Kansas town
offering to do odd jobs in ex-
change for a meal, people -are
suddenly jarred awake. Hal's
rippling muscles and flashy ex-
uberance become therapeutic
catalysts in a household of frus-
tratd women. Immediately, al-
most every female, young and
old, magically realizes that her
hops and dreams can be ful-
filled if only she does something
about them. Madge Owens
(Kim Novak) no longer wants
to be loved just for her beauty;
and her intellectual kid-sister
(Susan Strasberg), straining
with adolescence, struggles with
the thought that women are
more than intellect. A spinster
schoolteacher (Rosalind Rus-
sell) gallops after a reluctant
shopkeeper (Arthur O'Connell).
Only Mrs. Owens' (Betty Field)
dreams for her daughter turn
out to be too extravagant.
At the heart of the film is the
Labor Day picnic. The festivi-
ties begin in the blazing sun-
shine of the afternoon. James
Wong Howe's camera catches
the carefree and raucous energy
of these early hours with their
traditional games and customs
-men showing off their strength
by using children as weights,
fathers with sticks in their
mouths trying to spear rings,
foot races, and quartets. He
catches too the unsuspecting
non-participant who tries to
quiet a crying baby, shoo dogs
away from the picnic basket, or
sneak a drink from a hidden
flask.
But soon the afternoon turns
to evening and the sun wearies
into long relaxing shadows, and
the people, tired and dusty, grow
quieter. Finally, the glow of the
disappearing sun is replaced by
the silent reflections of Japa-
nese lanterns on the dark water.
We seem to be entering a kind
of fairy tale world. Presently,
we are sure of it. From out of
the darkness a beautiful young
girl sails to shore to be crowned
the new Queen.
This whole sequence is not
unrelated to the rest of the film
as some critics have maintained.
Nor is it merely a, realistic
chronicling of Mid-western cus-
toms. Actually it embodies the
vitality we associate with Hal
and the fantasy we associate
with the women of the Owens
household. Moreover, its drama-
tization of ritualized fantasy

colored. A "magic" film in the
vein of Melies, it not only
charmingly suggests the period
but makes the viewer want to
welcome Flora into his lares
and penates.
Our feature Saturday and
Sunday is Carl Dreyer's The
Passion of Joan of Arc, a silent
film made in France in 1928,
which the International Film
Critics Poll rated as among the
best (no. 4) of all time. Dreyer,
a Calvinist obsessed by genuine
evil as well as a sense of sin,
has contributed to film history
a series of films of which it can
be said that no one else could
have imprinted the same dis-
tinctive stamp. Vampyr, Day of
Wrath, Ordet are other major
works; but The Passion of Joan
of Arc is universally admitted
to be his masterpiece.
The film records the agonies
of Joan, with her head shaven,
(reminiscent of a Partisan vic-
tim, unfortunately, to contem-.
porary audiences) undergoing
her trial in Rouen, before going
to her fate as a political vic-
tim, with the obvious consent
of her Church. Her passion, as
Dryer conceived it and bril-
liantly brought to an artistic
triumph, is that of the dedi-
cated individual who has no
sense of expediency. But from
that suffering what has result-
ed? Dryer does not suggest ex-
cept inferentially that a new
French national state resulted
from this martyrdom; but this
new national state would also
have created its martyrs. It is
a highly subjective film that
dwells on the individual agony
and the stark loneliness of pro-
test.
A gruesome film, it is seldom
shown without a warning to
parents. That Dreyer hoped to
make it as a sound film is evi-
denced by the interchanges be-
tween Joan and her persecutors.
The only artistic defect in the
film-too many lines that had
to be given in dialogue. The
film's deliberately slow pace, its
relentless perusal of the details
of persecution, the final weight
of agony in Joan's immolation
and the simultaneous sense of
release epitomize man's appe-
tite for torture, so often, as
here, masked by morality and
patriotism.
An excellent analysis of this
film can be found in the Pen-
guin paperback, The Film and
the Public, by Roger Manvell
p. 119-123.
On the same program is a
feature - length documentary,
The Lady from Philadelphia,
which relates Marian Ander-
son's triumphant tour of South-
east Asia under State Depart-
ment auspices. In one sense, she
was sent many years too late;
but though she had to conserve
her vocal resources, you will
hear her inimitable singing of
spirituals, Lieder, folk songs,
and some popular numbers. The
woman of whom Toscanini said,
"A voice like yours is heard once
in a hundred years" was always
a fine artist and in many cases
unexcelled. Who now, in the
Ann Arbor of 1960, recalls her

GOTHIC FILM
SOCIETY
The first of this year's programs,
featuring Ingmar Bergman's THE
NAKED NIGHT ("Sawdust & Tin-
sel"), Sweden, 1954, will be given
this Monday, Oct. 10, at 8 P.M., in
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Admission is by subscription only;
a full subscription to ol 10 pro-
grams costs $5.00. Checks or mon-
ey orders may be sent to 2396 S.
State, Ann Arbor; subscriptions
may also be obtained before the
showings. For further information,
call NO 2-9359 or NO 2-6685; or
watch for detailed announcement
in this Friday's Daily.

FOR STUDY IN BRITAIN:
Applications Now Available
For Marshall Scholarships

mftwl

I

Discussion:

Read the Classifieds I

Next semester's topic

1I

no

STARTING
TODAY

DIAL
8-6416

I

READ
THESE
RAVESO.

"THE PICTURE IS COMMENDABLE ON EVERY COUNT I
A magnetic and moving film, ever so subtly it says
volumes. Schuman and Eva Ioithaus are first-rate as the
sweethearts. Clever and logical, Kautner hasn't Wissed
a trick. The climax bears him out with one of the most
penetrating fade-outs in yearsI" --Thompwn, N.Y. TYi""t
"AN EXCITING PICTURE!
Hlighly intriguing movie for the thoughtful viewer. Helmut
Kautner is becoming one of the leadingm..ports here and It 1%
no matter for complointi" -BIckI-, 4ra 'Trbm"ne
"CONSTANTLY ENGROSSING
AND CONSISTENTLY WELL DONE I
Kautner is a great creative talent. There is a mixture
of wistfu charm and realism whii comes of beautifully.
Deeply moving, exquisitely photographed The pictr
should attract appreciative oers from all woo
Our TownI" .--i Thmr, K Y. Poi A.

I

Students who wish to apply forv
a two-year scholarship to any one
of 22 Universities in the United
Kingdom under the Marshall
Scholarship plan can get applica-
tions from Assistant Dean of Men
Ivan Parker in Rm. 2011 SAB.
The scholarship pays $1540 for
living expenses, tuition, $70 for
books, $560 extra if the student
'U' Considers
Foreign Situdy
For Juniors
(Continued from Page 1)
gether and studying under teach-
ers from America.
The proposed program would
be determined by the University
through a faculty member living
at the school, but the students
would be on their own, and would
live with families.
The report lists the University
of Strasbourg, France, as a "ten-
tative suggestion'' for a location,
because of its cosmopolitan situa-
tion, good housing, and commu-
nication and transportation facili-
ties. The school has been recep-
tive to inquiries, but no agree-
ment would be made until a Uni-
versity official personally exam-
ines the situation.
Necessarily Limited
The program would necessarily
be limited to students of the
French language, but there are
long-range hopes that Strasbourg
could become the headquarters for
juniors studying in Germany,
Switzerland, or Italy, as well as
France.
The idea of receiving full Uni-
versity credit for a semester or
year of foreign study originated
in the literary college Steering
Committee, a student advisory
group.
Lists Obstacles
How much interest would stu-
dents have in such a program?
Such study at present involves
transferring to another college
with an established program (of
which there are at least 12), or
taking a chance on receiving any
University credit for the year. Al-
so, loans and scholarships are not
available.
This opportunity would be open
to personnel in all divisions of the
University, and also to students
from other institutions, although
the first priority would go to Uni-
versity students.
Advantages of the program list-
ed in the 1959 report are increas-
ed international understanding
and awareness, mastery of a Eu-
ropean language, and increased
prestige for the University in
Europe, similar to that enjoyed
in Asia.

is married, and passage from the
student's residence in the United
States to the university in the
United Kingdom and back.
Twenty-four scholarships will
be awarded in the United States,
four of which will go to students
in this mid-western region. Some
of the universities which the stu-
dents may attend include Cam-
bridge, Oxford, Edinburg, Liver-
pool, and London.
Applicants should have a degree
from an accredited university in
the region in which they are
applying. They cannot be over 26-
years-old; however, special con-
sideration will be given to 28-year-
old students who have been in the
armed services.
Students must have their appli-
cations in by Oct. 10. They will be
interviewed the following week by
the University's Marshall Scholar-
ship committee.
This committee will then submit
its candidates to the regional com-
mittee which will narrow the list
down to about 20. 'The regional
committee will interview these stu-
dents in November and will select'
four for the awards with six
others on reserve.
The scholarships are offered
by the British Government as an
"expression of gratitude" for the
aid which Great Britain received
from the Marshall Aid Program.
High academic ability and wide
interests in student activities will
be considered.
DIAL NO 5-6290
Note Time
tedSINNER
Schedule
wmg

OPENING THIS WEEK
iZSapknte44 6 t7Item
by SIDNEY KINGSLEY
directed by JERRY SANDLER
WINNER OF DRAMA CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD
Curtain time will be set back to 8:45 Friday only
to accommodate the Nixon-Kennedy debates
Thursday and Saturday cureain will still be 8:00.
Television will be set up in the lobby
for the patrons' convenience.
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY
Lydia Mendelssohn -- Box office opens 10:30 A.M.
All Seats Reserved
Thurs. -$1.50 Fri. & Sat. -$1.75
Season Tickets Still Available
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre

FREE!
little club,

I

f8irmwflMe

-dancing-
October 7 December 9
14
28
November 4 January 6
11 13
18

I

Helmut Kautner's

Sky Without tarsp
starng ERIK SGWMAN EVA KOTTHM~ H0 8 i

I

II

U

r.- -7 . W-1 k I

..
.y
f

I

See "Battle in
Outer Space"
at 1:00-3:50
6:50 and 9:45
See "12 to The
Moon"
at 2:40-5:35

DIAL NO 2-6264

NOW
thru
SATURDAY

lA S~imuusa
r~8c.A $ ii'JR LzwII~B
ELMER KNA
Shows at 1:00-3:30-6:15-8:50
Features at 1:08-3:40-6:25-9:00

I

at Union MUG

SPACE DECLARES WAR ON EARTH
OUTLAW PLANET CAPTURES THE MOON!

9-12

I

- FRIDAY -
"DARK AT THE TOP
OF THE STAIRS"

FREE!

I

#__ _

t

MICHIGAN -MICHIGAN STATE
~ MOVIES of Saturday's Game
Watch Fitzgerald's 99-0yard

I

I

wr~i~vm~ia' -~ ~Inw ~'~eita'~'mz

I "" : #'

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