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October 26, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE ..TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1966

PAGE TWO THE MiChiGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1966

CHARGE DISCRIMINATION:

Landlord-Picket Dispute Goes

(Continued from Page 1)
and his daughter. Its main con-
tention is that the issue -is not
one of rent, but of satisfactory
agreement on lease conditions. The
statement admits, however, that
after the original complaints fromj
the neighbors of the two girls,
certain things were said-and done
by all parties which would have
been better unsaid and undone."
This statement partially refers
to charges by the girls that Mrs.
Wagner had told them, through

Miss Wagner, "that the Wagners
wanted no Negroes in that house."
According to the two girls, "We
were to tell our Negro friends not
to visit us at our house or we
had to leave."
The girls filed a complaint with
the HRC on Oct. 3, claiming that
the verbalbnotice given them to
leave was based on racial consid-
erations. By that time Joan Wag-
ner, Wagner's daughter, had mov-
ed outtbecause,according to the
order, the relations between Miss

Wagner and the two girls had be-
come "intolerable."
Notice
About Oct. 13, an official evic-
tion notice was served.
The cause order charges that
after the two girls complained to
the HRC, they agreed to negotiate
a lease with Carpenter and there-
by "reduced their demands to
money."
This negotiation took place last
Wednesday. The result was that
the girls offered to pay $185 per
month-they paid $165 originally
-but that Wagner refused their
offer because, according to the
order, "the terms and conditions
did not represent reasonable terms
and conditions, and reflected, on
the contrary, the adolescent atti-
tudes of the defendants (Oakes
and Johnstone) that the rental
should be based on their ability
to pay . . . that as part of said
lease the defendants agreed to
release all claims-by a mutual
release-which they had or might
have against the plaintiffs ...
Terms
The girls and the picketers claim

that not only had they
terms and conditions, bu
Carpenter negotiated with
agreed that the terms we
and said that "If WagnE
not accept these terms Ic
stay on as his lawyer."
Carpenter admits thatl
this but claims it wasn't h
to make such a comment.
girls did not negotiate the
rather they dictated the
adds.
From the rejection of th
ner's terms to the presen
munication between the
parently has broken dow
girls claim that Wagner ne
them why he didn't acc
terms, and believe in fa
he wants them out.
Never Asked
Carpenter says that th
never asked why the tern
rejected, and asks, "If the
want a lease what do they
"This is a case of a ma
ing mistakes in racial relati
desiring to correct those m
These people won't accel
as sufficient. They want re

To Court,
offered He added that he thought the
it that group's desire for public apology
them, by Wagner would be "humiliat-
ere fair ing."
er does Board ....
will not "We'll negotiate a lease with
a five-man board with only one
he said representative from our side (Car-
is place penter) and agree to anything
"These that board decides, whether it's
terms, $160 or $240," he added, evidently
im," he referring to the HRC panel.
But the girls find it difficult
e Wag- to accept Wagner's good faith'
t, com- first, because the eviction notice
parties remains; second, because there
n. The have been no direct indications to
ver told them that "mistakes were made,"
ept the and finally because they are pres-
ct that ently being charged with serious
allegations in the pending court
case.
he girls Thus, agreement is still far off.

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By CAESAR BLAKE
The editor of GENERATION
quotes Browning to support this
year's first issue's ambition: "One
may do whate'er one likes in Art."
This means, in GENERATION,
variety (among the arts), boldness,
(not merely untried, but new),
"fun" ("...make sure that one
does like it"-continues Browning)
-lots of antennae reaching here
and there for maximum interest,
and maximum coverage of what
goes on in the arts -on campus.
People write stories-and here
are two: Lemual Johnson's as-
tonishingly intense rendering of
the critical moment of a teacher-
priest's "going under," and Clau-
dia Buckolts' dizzying projoction
of a young man's quasi-mystical
consciousness perhaps at the mo-
ment of its self-defeated collapse.
Mr. Johnson and Miss Buckolts
are good, very good, but one minor
suggestion: could she use some of
his almost too stringent economy
and tightness, and he some of her
not always controlled power of
amplifying .detail?
The poets and lovers of poetry
are well served. Martha MacNeal
Zweig has just about everything:
a good eye, a good ear, a rever-
berating mind and imagination,
and a pro's technique. "Impulse to
Dissolution" reads well, over and
over. Charles Silverman's "Un-
titled," like Ju d y Stonehill's
"Swing," has great verbal skills
to recommend it, but doesn't it
(or don't they) verge pretty close
-to a kind of nervous strain that
we are asked to take as wit? On
the other hand, the poignancy of.
Richard Widerkehr's "The Gam-
bit" is clear, firm, and only vague-
ly troubling in the working out
of its image.
There are photographs and
prints to represent the visual art-
ists. Jane Dreyfuss -admits she is
just beginning photography and
therefore we can excuse a certain
interest in elemental contrasts of
line and shape that seem not to
be the final possibility of the very
images her sensitive eye catches.
Vita Shapiro's pair of photos of
Will Geer caught the shadow and
sunshine contrasts of his pensive
and genial moods beautifully.
The gay, free, whimsy of Steven
Zapton's lithos is pleasing, though
I thing it unnecessary (and fun-
damentally mistaken) to call them
"sophisticated child drawings in

lithographs." Char-Lynn Smith'sl
lithos are unequivocally "adult"
or "sophisticated," as you please,
especially in the group of .several
,finely done heads and faces.
I don't know anything at all
about scores for the guitar, but
there is-Peter Griffith's here, com-
plete. And all I can ask is, "Why
not?"
And there are essays that are
not thunderously heavy with liter-
ary criticism or philosophical nail-
biting. Which is not to say that
Jerome Segal's "On Ownership"
is not very serious, and genuinely
interesting. It is an extraordinary
piece that gets hold of the old
tradition of the familiar essay in
its very personal idiom, and at
the same time easily and dicreetly
uses the devices of the discursive,
documented article. As to its argu-
ments, the last sentence of the
essay works two ways.
The other essay is an interview;
with Will Geer, doubtless a fasci-
nating person. Miss Richmond is to'
be applauded for obscuring herself
as questioner, but it is a bit puzzl-
ing to wonder what questions Mr.
Geer was answering from time to
time. Several Geers seem to get
started, but none continues long
enough to be as interesting as the
man surely is.
Then, finally, Richard Reich-
man's play. It is a lively, insistent
piece of. business that occasionally
gets hung on its own word-play
(because the badinage gets noth-
ing forward). I take it as a merit
that one, gets echoes of the
Brecht-Ionesco-Pinter m o d e s:
Reichman obviously has a - sure
sense of contemporary theater,
and works well within its exigen-
cies. There may be some awkward-
ness in the resolution, but the play
develops pretty carefully all along
the, way.
All in all, this issue does its
editors proud. If it aimed for
variety and amplitude, it got there
clearly and, in a sense, differently,
considering some past GENERA-
TION schemes. The quality? As
high and as even, I suspect, as the
body of artistic effort it repre-
sents. It may be helpful in future,
though, to consider the difficulty
in Browning's line, and guard
against the. new that is not true,
and against self-indulgence that
masquerades as "art" of "love" or
both. (For the sake of art, of
course.).

ms were
ay don't
y want?
n mak-
ons and
istakes.
pt that
venge."

I7IAN p, V SIZ'EN¢r

11

Cutler Offers Modifications
Of Regents' Power Decision'

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(Continued from Page 1)
matters such as "drugs, behavior
resulting from psychological dis-
turbance and prostitution and
other sex-related questions."
Cutler's tentative plan calls for
an expanded judicial group simi-
lar to the Joint Judiciary Council
that would include a lawyer and
mental health expert to deal with
specialized problems.
Cutler says that he plans to
"develop a system which will take
into account the diverse nature
of the University community" that
embraces his "belief in the im-
portance of student involvement
and accountability for affairs
which concern them,"
In developing the system Cutler
said the University "must insure
due process within a framework
that is legally sound and defen-
sible in the face of a court test."

He also plans to "involve as
broad a segment of the commun-
ity as possible in the development
of an effective and workable sys-
tem."
Cutler also suggested the need
for a "University-wide standard
for conduct" that "should take -
carefully into account the tradi-
tion of the University as an in-
stitution devoted to the principles
of freedom with responsibility."

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