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April 13, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE T«Vo,.:..:a

THE MICHIGA N DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 111967

PAGE- -W H ICIA AIYTT-rA PIL1 O'

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Multi-University Group Receives Grant
For Development of Geology Visual Aids

TO ALLEVIAT E PARKING PROBLEM:
'U' Ponders Replacing Campus Streets With Malls

By NANCY SHAW
The National Science Founda-
tion has -given the Committee on
Institutional Co-operation a $50,-
335 grant to develop a program of
visual aids for geolgy courses.
The CIC consists of the Univer-
sity of Chicago and the Big Ten.
Most of the work in the new pro-
gram is being done by representa-
tives from the other universities.
However; Prof. William Farrand
of the University's geology depart-
ment will participate in the sec-
ond stages of preparation in 1968.
It is hoped that the visual aids

will be ready for use in the 1968-
69 academic year.
The purpose is to cut the num-
ber° of costly field trips that are
usually necessary for a geology
student. However, the materials
would only be used in introduc-
tory courses, according to Prof.
Donald F. Eschmann of the same
department.
"It would merely complement
the materials involved in lecture
and lab," he said.
The NSF grant is being used on
only one site. Videotapes, movies,
and color slides will cover a forest
bed at Two Creeks, Wis., which
was covered by the last ice ad-
vance 11,800 years ago. The aids
will 'be an example of geologists'
methods for constructing histori-
cal sequences.
Not Optimistic
Prof. John A. Dorr of the geo-
logy department said that the Uni-
versity's use of the materials
would depend-on the results. "I'm
not particularly optimistic about
this," he said.
E?_ i " CaIFII"

"If you take one place and
saturate it with investigative tech-
niques, you get one small segment
of subject matter.,
"It doesn't necessarily have to
be very interesting. It could turn
out to be an enormous exposition
of methodology and no subject
matter at all."
Present Visual Aids
He added that the NSF program
isn't much of an innovation, as the
department already has many vis-,
ual aid materials.
Prof. Eschmann said it would
not replace the present field trips.
Now, students in Geology 111, fall
term, take a trip around Ann
Arbor for which they are not
charged. In 112, spring term, there
are two trips to Sylvania; Ohio,
and Grand Ledge, Michigan. Stu-
dents pay a $7 fee for these.
The department must spend
about $1,000 a year to cover field
trips, he said. Two-thirds to three-
quarters of this sum goes to in-
troductory courses.
ifR

1'

SUMMER
is not

very

far

away!
Subscribe
to

Success in Book Drive

u

zip~
ummner.

By JOYCE WINSLOW
Over 300 books have been col-
lected by the Engineering Council
in their drive to supply an engin-
eering college in' Vietnam with
basic texts.
This drive started last Wednes-
day in response to a personal plea
from Major James dritchfield, Ad-
visor to the Vietnam Air Force En-
gineering College in Binh-Duong,
South Vietnam for basic texts with
which to train a corps of Civil
Engineers.
"The response has been wonder-
ful," Joe Shipley, '68E,chairman
of the drive lsaid. "We have re-
ceived books primarily"from fac-
.ulty, many from students, and
some from outside contributors.
Ulrich's book store has given us
25 books in diversified engineer-
ing subjects. And the Ann Arbor
Public Library has promised us all
the books they dox't sell at their
annual sale in May."'

"In addition, Walter Helmreich,
a representative from Bendix Cor-
poration who saw our ad in The
Daily, is collecting books from
Bendix employees," Chris Jorgen-
sen '68E, personnel chairman said.
"The naval" architecture depart-
ment has already shipped a carton
of books to Vietnam, and the Elec-
trical Engineering department has
given us books." These depart-
ments responded to signs in the
engin arch made by Dennis La-
nyon, '68E, and Dick Bowman,
'68E:
Because of the enthusiastic re-
sponse, the Council is extending
the book drive through this week.
Receptacles for books are at the
West Engin building by the Engin
Arch on the first floor and at East
Engin by both doors.
"The book drive is a good way
to contribute something to the
Vietnam war other than bullets,"
Jorgensen said.

(Continued from Page 1)
So, it was only logical back in
1962 that the University attempt
to discourage students from bring-
ing cars to campus. The $7 reg-
istration fee was primarily for that
purpose, but it has abviously fail-
ed in that respect, since over 3.-
500 cars go unregistered each year
and parking tickets are collected
and treasured like green stamps.
The student traffic advisory
board, chaired by Ken Krone, '67
says that "building parking struc-
tures for students is too costly."
Krone explained that the pur-
chase of present facilities would
cost $36 per foot. This 300 per
cent increase over the past five
years would mean that a normal
automobile would spend close to
$3000 sitting on a bed of concrete
At 10 cents per car per day, it
would take 83 years to pay off
such a structure.
Krone explained that student
registration fees over the past
years will have built up to "a
$15000 surplus fund at the end
of this year." Even that money
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is not enough to build one struc-
ture.
So next year, parking registra-
tion will probably go down to $2
a car from the $4 a car this year
as administrators hastily try to a
least get a sampling of how many
cars students really do have.
This will, of course, mean that
more cars will be on campus.
With an estimated 15,000 cars
on the campus next year, an added
7000 parking tickets for the police
to process, and no new parking
places for students, there appears
only one solution to the problem.
Get rid of the streets.
University planner John D. Tel-
fer has for a long time suggested
that the central campus (and per-
haps later the outer campuses),
be sealed off and made into a
mall.
Pedestrian Campus
In a report published in Sep-
tember} 1966, Telfer suggested the
"increasingly undesirable traffic
situation" be remedied by slowly
closing off the campus' streets

and turning the University into a
pedestrian area.
In some complex evidence, Tel-
fer shows that over 90 per cent,
of the 10,000 cars going thr'rugh
the campus area each day "only
go through " Cars that stop long-
er than 15 minutes within the
area of the study were relatively
few-obviously due to the "rela-
tively few" parking spaces avail-
able.
The University has p-rndered
Telfer's proposal for quite some
time, and it now looks as though
something might finally happen.
Close Streets
Telfer hopes that this summer
;he University will ask the Cty
Council to close off Ingals Street
:from North University to East
Washington) and East University
(running in front of the Engi-
neering buildings).
He hopes eventually to see the
"entire campus" sealed off.
Dick Koester of the student bus
service, who feels "students want
to keep their cars," did feel that

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STARTS FRIDAY

if the campus were sealed, "mass
transit would become more accept-
able."
Present commuter buses take
care of about 1200 passengers
daily, according to Koester, and
this is with only two small com-
muter buses that make a "trip"
circling the campus in about 20
minutes.-
Presently, Koester says "we try
to have service at every stop every
eight to 10 minutes." With added

buses and staff, mass transit does
not seem so infeasible.
If the University ever does seal
itself in a cocoon of pedestrian
sidewalks, students would still be
able to keep their cars, traffic
problems would go down, mass
transit would make up for the
inconvenience of distance and the
only sad situation would be at
the Ann Arbor police station.
They wouldn't have as many
tickets to keep themselves busy.

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Feature Times
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GEORGE SEGAL- SANDY DENNIS
P R eEtedby MIKE NICHOLS
PRESENTED BY WARNER BROS.

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RITA TUSH INGHAM
inRichard Lester's
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TONGHT and SATURDAY
8:30 P.M:
FATHER TOM VAUGHN TRIO
IN CONCERT
PENN THEATRE
Plymouth, Michigan
(only 20 minutes from campus)
Reserved Seats-$3.50
Good seats available
Box office opens 7:30 P.M.

Euza1mmu
TVina
IN ERNEST LEHMAN'S PRODUCTION OF
EDWARD ALBEE'S
wirnL'n
E=EUIED UPE
Vuus~uiaiE
W~LF*-

SHOW TIMES:
FRIDAY--7 & 9:30 P.M.
SATURDAY-5, 7:30, 10 P.M.
SUNDAY-6, 8:30 P.M.
MON.-THURS.-8 P.M. ONLY

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SHORT:
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Asuperbharrooing,
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I Tramlated by Donald Watnon I

IU

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