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April 13, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-13

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PAGE TBRES

THURSDAY, APRIL 13, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAIL'Y'

THURSDAY, APRIL 13, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

i

Hemisphere
Talks Open
In Uruguay
Peruvian President
Airs Latin American
Capital Market Plan
By The Associated Press
PUNTA DES ESTE, Uruguay-
The inter-American summit con-
ference opened yesterday behind
closed doors, hoping to find some
answers to the many economic
problems of the 230 million people
of Latin America,
As the session began, President
Fernando Belaunde Terry of Peru
announced a plan to check the
flow of capital from Latin Amer-
ica.
He said the presidents of Latin
America are planning a hem-
isphere-wide common stock mark-
et to provide an outlet for do-
mestic capital and to attract new
capital from industrialized na-
tions.
One of the major obstacles to
agreement at the conference was
the Latin American desire to
spend Alliance forProgress dollars
anywhere in the hemisphere. Now
i those dollars must be spent in the
United States.
Lincoln Gordon, U.S. assistant
secretary of state for inter-Amer-
ican afairs, told reporters Presi-
dent Johnson might give the La-
tins their answer in the closed
door sessions.
Another vexing point arose
from Latin demands for greater
share of U.S. markets on a pre-
ferential basis - meaning special
tariff' concessions.
Gordon conceded that the in-
dustrial United States and lesser
developed Latin America natural-
ly figured to collide.
Johnson hoped to nail down
agreement for a common market
in Latin America that will inte-
grate the nations' economies and
dampen trade rivalries.
But he was expected to give
i only tranquilizing answers to
Latin American demands for more
aid beyond the $1 billion a year
of the Alliance for Progress and
permission to spend aid dollars
somewhere other than in the
United States.
Latin countries voluntarily as-
sumed responsibility for estab-
lishing the common market and a
working group finally reached a
patched-up compromise on the
preamble to the presidents' final
summit statement.
The United States wanted the
preamble to touch on the matter
'r-of hemisphere security, principal-
ly security from Communist in-
filtration. It is supported by Bra-
zil and Argentina although other
nations have been dead set
against any mention of political
considerations, for their own do-
mestic reasons, and want to con-
fine the preamble to economic
agreements.
South American members of the
Latin American Free Trade As-
sociation talked about inviting the
Central American common market
to share an Aug. -15 meeting in
RAsuncion, Paraguay.
In addition to economic ques-
tions, the conference has been
marked by demonstrations and
disagreements over the U.S. stand
on Vietnam.
The heads of the Roman Cath-
olic and Evangelist churches
asked President Oscar D. Gestide
of Uruguay, permanent president
of the summit, to impress the
need for peace on Johnson and
ask him to use "all possible meas-
ures" to get it.

Communist-dominated Uruguay-
an labor unions tried to stage a
24-hour general strike but it
failed to ignite. Most of the coun-
try's life went on as usual. A
bomb, damaged a U.S. business
house in Montevideo.
Left-wing students of the Uni-
versity of Montevideo, who rioted
Tuesday stayed inside their auto-
nomous school while police cor-
doned off the area.

-Associated Press
PROTESTING EXECUTION
American Nazi George Lincoln Rockell (center) holds the placard which he carried among a group of
persons outside of San Quentin prison yesterday w here they were protesting the execution of Aaron
Mitchell, 37, first person to die in a prison gas chamber in more than four years.
ENEMY TOO CLOSE:
South Vietnamese To Attemp
Civilian Evacuation at Border

Truek Firms SIGNS NEW LAW:
End Lockout Presiden
Over W ages WASHINGTON OP)-The unions
iVTrainvolages nved inthe railroad wage dis-
ute set a new nationwide strike
Contract Dispute Hits deadline of May 3 after President
HitsJohnson signed legislation yester-
Automobile Industry; day extending the legal no-strike
National Damage Low period until that date.
Johnson also named a three-
WASHINGTON (P)-Longhaul man special panel to seek a set-
truckers resumed work yesterday, tlement during the 20-day ex-
ending a three-day lockout that tension. And at the same time he
did not last long enough to be felt issued a stern notice to both sides
by most of the country, to come to an agreement.
But the auto industry, unable to The President signed the legis-
get parts shipments, still had some lation in the living room of the
24,000 workers laid off. Other in- temporary White House at Punta
dustries also continued to feel the del Este, Uruguay, where he is
impact of delayed deliveries of raw meeting with Latin - American
materials and parts. heads of state.
Tons of merchandise remained After the House and Senate
stacked up at loading docks and had passed the resolution by an
warehouses, where some spokes- overwhelming margin Tuesday,
men said it would take perhaps a Johnson issued a warning of
week to return to normalcy, further strike-blocking action by
Ninety per cent of Chicago's Congress if no agreement is
vital truck fleet, however, remain- reached.
ed idle yesterday as contract ne- Yesterday he declared:
gotiations continued between 4,700 "The urgency which prompted
trucking firms and 56,000 drivers Congress to act should serve to
and dock workers who were not notify both sides, as they return
parties to the tentative agreement to the bargaining table, that the
reached here. American people look to them for
The nationwide lockout, which selfless and responsible action in
threatened to curtail drastically
much of the nation's supply lines,
ended early yesterday after the Picketers A s
Teamsters Union and Trucking
Employers Inc. reached a proposed
settlement that reportedly includes upport
over three years. Su otM g
Trucking Employers who have LANSING (Al)-Backers of Mich-
settled negotiations from coast to igan Mexican-American migrants
coast responded almost imme- staged a second demonstration in
diately although a Teamsters of- front of the state Capitol yester-
ficial in Cincinnati, Ohio, said it day, picketing in a circle and car-
would take 24 to 48 hours before rying signs just below the office
all idled drivers there are re- of Gov. George Romney.
called. Concerned Citizens for Migrants
M. M. Gordon, president of has asked Romney to take definite
Trucking Employers Inc. said the action on two bills before the
Trucking Employer directors, who Legislature affecting m i g r a n t
approved the tentative agreement workers.
shortly after it was reached, would "Michigan Problems First,"
urge its acceptance today by the "Gov. Romney Take a Stand" and
industry policy committee. "Gov. Romney We Need Action"
The Teamsters Union, which were among the signs carried by
asked its locals to cooperate in some 50 pickets.
getting the trucks rolling again, Ruben Alfaro, leader of the de-
said its members would vote on monstration, said the pickets
the proposed contract by secret would continue on duty for eight
ballot during the April 22-23 hours. The group previously held
weekend, a mass meeting at the Capital on
The agreement, details of which Easter Sunday after some marched
were not disclosed, also includes from Saginaw starting Good Fri-
cost-of-living pay increases, addi- day, to dramatize their cause.
tional pension and health bene- The group is asking Romney to:
fits and an increase in mileage -Take action to see that mi-
payments to longhaul drivers who grants are represented on a pro-
are now receiving between $3.32 posed commission on migrant
and $5 an hour. labor to be created within the
In addition to increased fringe state labor department.
benefits, the Teamsters originally -Help block a bill that would
sought a 75-cent hourly pay hike further postpone the effective
over three years. The employers date for workmens compensation
had offered a 37-cent an hour for some migrant workers, passed
wage increase. by the Legislature in 1965.

the best tradition of industrial
democracy.
An April 13 strike deadline
marked the end of a 60-day truce
provided for by law. Johnson,
in signing the 20-day extension,
noted that the Railway Labor Act
calls for a 60-day cooling-off
period in contrast to 80 days

under the Taft-Hartley Act which
applies outside the transportation
field.
The resolution, he said, in ef-
fect simply puts the rail workers
in the same situatioin that would
confront industrial workers threat-
ening a major strike.

Schools in South Ask
Delay in Integration.

WASHINGTON 0'P)-Six Louisi-
ana school boards urged Supreme
Court Justice Hugo L. Black yes-
terday to delay the ordered in-
tegration of all public schools in
six Southern states.
The March 29 ruling by the U.S.
Circuit Court in New Orleans, La.,
"would create great chaos" if it
were enforced immediately, the
school boards said.
They claimed schools might
have to be relocated and contracts
for teachers voided in order to

I

t Delays Rail Strike

comply with the ruling. And they
Romney To
ant Workers
Alfaro said Romney "showed
sympathy" but would not take a
definite stand on either bill at a
meeting with the migrants last
week.

asserted the Circuit Court's adop-
tion of guidelines by the Depart-
ment of Health, Education and
Welfare violated constitutional
separation of powers.
Ask for Appeal
In its 8-4 decision the Circuit
Court said the public schools in
Louisiana, Alabama, Florida, Geor-
gia, Mississippi and Texas must
be integrated from kindergarten
upward at the start of the fall
term,
The six school boards asked
Black, who has judicial supervision
over the court in New Orleans, to
delay implementation of the ruling
until an appeal from it cdn be
filed with the Supreme Court and
acted on.
The Welfare ;Department guide-
lines adopted by the Circuit Court
set minimum criteria for integrat-
ing school systems that accept
federal funds and set down specific
percentages for achieveing inte-
gration.

By The Associated Press
SAIGON -- South Vietnamese
government leaders are consider-
ing a plan to remove civilians
from much of the northernmost
province, Quang Tri, because of
the growing menace of Communist
forces in the area.
In Washington a Senate in-
vestigating committee expressed
concern over the drains on the
Atlantic fleet made by the Viet-
nam war.
The idea of transporting Viet-
namese civilians to safer territory
cropped up a week ago after Com-
munist troops had stormed into
Juang Tri City, the provincial
capital 20 miles south of the Demi-

litarized Zone, and held it for sev-
eral hours.
Civilians Given Choice
The civilians would be given the
option of moving into North Viet-
nam-which borders Quang Tri
Province at the 17th parallel-or
being resettled under government
supervision farther south.
The area then would be con-
sidered a full war zone, and any-
one caught there by the allies
would be considered an enemy
and subject to treatment as such.
The Vietnamese source acknowl-
edged, however, that even if Sai-
gon's government okayed the idea,
American help would be needed

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
MOSCOW-Soviet space pion--
eers predicted yesterday new man-
ned space flights-after a gap of
more than two years. There were
hints of cosmonauts probing deep-
er into space than before.
At a Kremlin meeting cele-
brating the sixth anniversary of
his achievements as the first man
to make a space flight, Yuri A.
Gagarin said he and other cos-
monauts "are making ourselves
ready for new starts."
Another cosmonaut, Alexei A.
Leonov, the first man to walk in
space, predicted that new Soviet
spaceships would carry more than
three men andl leave near-earth
space for probes farther-out.
HONG KONG-Reports from
Red China said yesterday that
supporters of President Liu Shao-
chi > ave a grip on at least seven
provinces.
Provincial broadcasters in east-
central China called on supporters
of party Chairman Mao Tse-tung
to unite against his enemies led
by Liu.
In the opinion of Western ana-
lysts in Hong Kong, this indicated
that Mao and his heir apparent,
Defense Minister Lin Piao, face
plenty of trouble in trying to
root out the opposition in the hin-
terlands.

NEW YORK-An international-
ly famed Chinese violinist emerged
dramatically from refuge here
yesterday, and said he fled his
Communist homeland beneath the
fearful spur of Red Guard terror-
ism.
"I spent 103 days in a dreadful
hideout for devils and demons and
underwent what is too painful to
describe," said the defector, Ma
Szu-tsung, who has been granted
asylum with his family in this
country.
LAS VEGAS - While heavy-
weight champion Cassius Clay was
boarding a plane to leave here
Tuesday, a newsman asked if he
definitely will go into the Army
April 28 as his draft board has
ordered,
"'Yes," he replied. "It would
break my mother's heart if I
didn't."

for transporting the people.
No known approach has been
made to U.S. officials. Some field
commanders reportedly favor the
idea.
Worried About Fleet
Senate preparedness investiga-
tors in Washington contend the
war in Vietnam has left the U.S.
Atlantic Fleet short of trained
manpower, ships, airplanes and
ammunition.
Secretary of the Navy Paul H.
Nitze replied that the fleet "is and
has been capable of execution of
all its contingency assignments."
The Senators conceded that "the
Atlantic Fleet is still a formidable
and efficient fighting force."
Atlantic Ships Borrowed
Their censored report, made
public Wednesday by the Senate
preparedness investigating sub-
committee, said the naval require-
ments of the Vietnam conflict may
increase and cannot be handled
as "short-term emergency de-
mands."
The Atlantic fleet has been sup-
porting operations in Southeast
Asia with meri, ships and aircraft,
the report said, and this has re-
duced its capabilities. The extent
of the reduction was censored.
5<=o--o =o<c>o<c=
INDIA ART SHOP
° Since 1933V
Exotic Gifts from
the Orient
330 Maynard St.
(next to carport)

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Monday, April 17:
"Backfire"
Tuesday, April118:
TWO WALT DISNEY SHORTS:
"Wind in the Willows" &
"The Legend of Sleepy Hollow"
Both nights at
7:00 P.M. -and 9:15 P.M.
UGLI Multipurpose Room

Tonight it the ARK
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MI(HIGAMUA

Study This
Summer
In The Nation's Capital
At
GEORGETOWN
UNIVERSITY
Washington, D.C.
TWO SESSIONS
June 13-July 21
July 24-September 1
Undergraduate and Graduate
Day and Evening Classes
Special Activities, Conferences,
Institutes
Air-Conditioned Classrooms
and Dormitories

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CAMP OUT AT C
DURING E
OFFICIAL HUMPHREY
MONDAY, April 17:
ALL TIME BOGAR
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TUESDAY, April 18;
WORLD WAR 11O
SAHA
WEDNESDAY, April 19:
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THURSDAY, FRIDAY, Ap
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