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January 25, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-25

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 25,1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE.TRREE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1966 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

RHODESIAN CRISIS:

Attacks on Base Kill Americans,

Wilson Plans New Sanctions

Viet Cong End New

Year

Truce

LOND
HaroldI
nounceo
plan to
breakawe
stitutionk
his stat

*RuskTak
OnBomb
Resumption
Fulbright Wants Viet
Cong Recognized,
Bombings Paused
WASHINGTON (P)-Sen. J. W.
Fulbright (D-Ark) advocated yes-
terday an indefinite continuation
in the lull in bombing of North
Viet Nam and direct participa-
tion of the Viet Cong in any ne-
gotiations for a settlement.
Fulbright, chairman of the For-
eign Relations Committee, ad-
vanced his views after Secretary
of State Dean Rusk was question-
ed for three hours behind closed
doors. In that session, Rusk un-
derwent a cross-fire from both
opponents and advocates of an
early resumption of the bombing.
"Personally' I think we ought to
give a longer time in the bombing
lull for the consideration of our-
selves and others involved," Ful-
bright told reporters.
"My own feeling is the policy of
not recognizing the Viet Cong as
a major party to any negotiations
may be a stumbling block to the
% peace offensive."
Fulbright's statRment came
amid reports President Johnson
is expected to decide this week
whether to resume the bombing in
the North. The same reports said
no major escalation of the war,
such as the bombing of Hanoi, is
considered likely.

,+

SAIGON (') - The Viet Cong Moscow Feb. 21 to discuss Viet returns fi
launched about 40 mortar shells Nam with Soviet leaders. He fac
at the big U.S. Marine base of Da Meanwhile, Prime Minister Eis- Informa
Nang early today, aiming at bar- aku Sato of Japan said yesterday son will
racks and an oil storage area. A he favors a reopening of the of tough
U.S. military spokesman said first Geneva Conference on Viet Nam with an
reports indicated one American and he plans to send a peace en- he beli
killed and a few wounded. voy to generate support for the can end
There were no reports of fire . idea among nations that signed
although eight to 10 rounds of the 1954 Geneva agreements. The l
60mm and 81mm mortar fire fell Sato, replying to a question at one eye
:>{ on the base, including the oil and a news conference, said: tion in
gasoline storage area. "We have made plans to send could th
The spokesman said the attack an envoy. We would like to see a son's g
lasted but 15 minutes and was the reopening of the Geneva Confer- is to fi]
least effective of any attack ence. The main thing is to get of a La
launched by the Communists the parties concerned together so last Nov
against the base. No Marine planes they can talk." -Loss
were hit, he added.
Inffectual 'C
Earlier, U.S., South Vietnamese, R 6 ub iCalts SuhKraAsrla n
South Korean. Australian and
.NewZealand forces launched what
were described as major search
and destroy operations, but feI E3geUd'b
details were given. Allied forces

ON {P' - Prime Minister
Wilson is going to an-
a "carrot and big stick"
day designed to bring
ay Rhodesia back to con-
al rule. He will make
ement when Parliament
rom Christmas recess.
ces some sharp opposition.
nts said last night Wil-
unfold a twin program
h new sanctions, coupled
outline of ways in which
eves the African colony
its 10-week rebellion.
Election
egislators assembled with
cocked to a special elec-
Hull Thursday which
threaten the life of Wil-
overnment. The election
11 the parliamentary seat
borite legislator who died
ember.
of the seat would reduce
arim Costs

the government's margin in the
House of Commons to a solitary
vote. The Labor party won the
seat in 1964 by the slim margin
of 1.181 votes. Rebel Laborite
Richard Gott is campaigning'
against the official party candi-
date, Kevin McNamara, on the
very issue which is splitting the
Labor party - the government's
support of the United States in
the Viet Nam conflict.

sis has split the Conservatives
badly and at times some have de-
fied their own leaders' support
for sanctions.
Nevertheless, Conservative lead-
er Edward Heath indicated in a
speech to the Commonwealth Cor-
respondents' Association yester-
day that his support of the gov-
ernment on Rhodesia is wearing
thin. He warned Wilson to aban-
don his policy of refusing to talk

The question to be answered to Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian
Thursday is whether Gott will Smith or members of his gov-
draw off enough votes from Mc- ernment .Heath did not say what
Namara to give the nod to Con- his attitude would be toward fur-
servative candidate Toby Jessel. ther sanctions but outlined a pro-
Moment of Stress gram to help Rhodesia return to
In this moment of stress for ' the party of constitutional devel-
the Labor government, the Con- opment withi the Common-
servatives are 'expected to at- saltns.
tack hard on the Rhodesian issue One point he did make was
and on the government's handling Britain must initiate a crash pro-
of domestic affairs. granm of educating African Rho-
. An announcement of further desians for self-governmentand
economic measures against the be ready to assist in the economic
Salisbury regime is bound to bring development of the country. It
an outcry from right-wing Con- was on the question of eventual
servatives who have assailed from rule by the black Africans that
the outset what they called puni- the White Rhodesian .government
tive sanctions. The Rhodesia cri- declared its independence last No-
vember.

curate

. I

: :Gi{:~..... ..................... ... .

-W &WIN,

LADY EDITOR

Cambridge, Mass.-Linda C. McVeigh, a Radcliffe student,
has become the first woman managing editor of the Harvard'
Crimson, the student daily newspaper for Harvard University.

Fulbright lined up, with Sen.
Mike Mansfield of Montana, the
Senate majority leader, who ear-
lier urged ax presidential decision
to continue the pause in the bomb-
ings as long as there is a "faint
glimmer of hope" for peace nego-
tiations.
Under questioning by reporters,
Rusk himself said he didn't want
"to get into that - into what
may happen in the future."
Secretary of Defense Robert S.

McNamara declined to give any
indication whether the United
States is planning to resume its
bombing of North Viet Nam.
But he reminded reporters upon
leaving a closed session of Sen-
ate Armed Services and Appro-
priations Committees that after a
bombing lull, of 31 days-designed
to bring the war to the confer-
ence table-there had been "no
indication North Viet Nam is will-
ing to.enter into negotiations."

WorIlI News Rou
now,

r .fl -- -

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The Selective
Service System said yesterday it
has instructed local draft boards
that young men under orders for
induction no longer should be
permitted to enlist in the Na-
tional Guard or Reserves.
A spokesman said a bulletin
was sent to -all state draft direc-
tors and local boards last week
which changes an Aug. 5 direc-
tive to provide for cancellation
of induction orders only to per-
mit enlistment in the regular
forces-Army, Navy and Air Force.
to aid in an intensified recruiting
The August directive was issued
effort.
WASHINGTON -- The Senate
took up the issue yesterday of
ending the authority of states to
ban the union shop and began its
first floor fight of 1966 amid
talk of filibuster.
But the Senate turned to a
major piece of administration leg-
islation, the repeal of section 14B
of the Taft-Hartley law. This

permits states to forbid union
shop contracts under which em-
ployes are required to join a
union or ,at least, pay union dues.
Nineteen states have such laws.
Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield of Montana moved to
take it up, and Republican Lead-
er Everett M. Dirksen of Illinois
rose immediately to protest.
JACKSON, Miss.-Mississippi's
SState Sovereignty Commission
seems doomed--0 years after it
was formed to fight for segrega-
tion.
r Even militant segregationists
who once hailed the commission
as a possible savior, now want it
abolished.- They say it doesn'tj
fight hard enough.
The state administration would
rather tame the commission to a
state publicity agency.
Formal decision is up to the
Slegislature. But for all practical
purposes, the commission already
is a mere shadow of its former
powerful image.
MOSCOW-The U.S. Embassy

said last night an autopsy showed
the American Newcomb Mott ap-
parently died from a slashed,
throat while a prisoner of the'
Soviet Union.
There was nothing in a care-
fully worded embassy statement
to support the official Soviet ex-
planation that Mott committed
suicide.
An embassy spokesman said the
Russians did not disclose the in-
strument which made the fatal
wound. A doctor and a consular
officer from the embassy attend-
ed a three hour and 15 minute
medical inquiry into Mott's death
yesterday.
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan - In-
dian and Pakistani troops, fac-
ing each other since their 22-day
war last September, start with-
drawing from forward positions
today, it was officially announc-
ed yesterday.
This follows a meeting between
the Pakistani army commander
in chief, Gen. Mohammed Musa,
and his Indian counterpart, Gen.
J. N. Chaudhuri, in New Delhi
last Saturday.

reported little initial contact with WASHINGTON (P)- Republi-.
the Communists in the jungles cans in Congress questioned Pres-
and rice paddies. .ident Johnson's budget estimate
With the expiration of the 3-day yesteday thatfederal renues
allied lunar new year truce at will come within $1.8 billion of
6 p.m. Sunday, U.S. Air Force meeting next year's outlays.
planes went into action and struck "Even a slight downturn in
a major Viet Cong encampment1 business activity could upset this
about 90 miles southwest of Sai- delicately designed apple cart,"
gon- said Rep. Frank T. Bow of Ohio,
Communists Killed senior Republican on the House
A forward air controller esti- Appropriations Committee.
mated 190 Communists were killed. Democrats defended Johnson's
A U.S. spokesman said the planes $112.8-billion budget as "sound
destroyed 30 buildings, damaged to the core." That was the phrase
35 and touched off an explosion used by House Democratic Lead-
that could have been a fuel or er Carl Albert of Oklahoma, who
ammunition dump. also said the President's fiscal
The Viet Cong raised a new blueprint is "tough, taut, starkly
threat to US. prisoners. A broad- honest."
cast said the United States and Republicans generally shied away
South Viet Nam would "have to from any criticism of defense
bear full responsibility" if they budgeting, saying they would sup-
imprisoned or executed three ter- port whatever is needed to back
rorists arrested Jan. 7 with 265 the war in Viet Nam. They con-
pounds of explosives near Saigon. centrated their fire instead on
The three were plotting to bomb Johnson's domestic programs.
a U.S. Army billet in Saigon, Referring to the President's pro-
Vietnamese police said. jected deficit of only $1.8 bil-
New Operations lion, Sen. Leverett Saltonstall (R-
A U.S. military spokesmen said Mass) said that in recent years
Americans, South Koreans, Aus- the government's revenue esti-
tralians and New Zealanders have mates seldom have come up to ex-
opened some major operations but pectations.
declined to say how many, where On the other hand, he said,
or in what strength. "we have seen that the expendi-,
The operations were backed by tures estimated in the budget are
air cover and artillery, and it ap- generally less than the ultimate'
peared that several operations costs."
against the Viet Cong were shap- Bow said he had never seen a
ing up. budget "based on more tenuous
Southwest of Can Tho, Viet- revenue assumptions." He con-
namese troops ambushed a platoon tended the relatively small deficit
of Viet Cong and reported killing estimate is based on "highly un-
two and capturing three. certain assumptions regarding
The bombing pause against both revenue and proposed reduc-
North Viet Nam entered its 33rd tions in spending."
day, and Peking sneered at the Rep. Gerald R. Ford of Michi-
cessation of air attacks as a ri- gan, the House Republican leader;
diculous farce. Pledged the GOP's maximum ef-
Resume Bombing forts to reduce "nonmilitary, non-
Prepident Johnson is expected essential spending."
to decide this week whether to "I fi d it hard to understand,"
resume the bombing of North Ford's statement said, "how the
Viet Nam. In London, a high gov- national government can ask bus-
ernment source reported Foreign ness and labor to avoid price
Secretary Michael Stewart willI and wage increases which are
ask for an extension of the bomb- measured in terms of millions of
ing pause when he flies to Wash- dollars when it is increasing non-
ington Wednesday. The British defense spending by many bil-
hope there will be no further lions."
bombings, at least until Prime Albert termed the budget a
Minister Harold Wilson visits "masterfully balanced budget -

because it balances our foreign
commitments against our domes-;
tic needs."
Rep. Hale Boggs of Louisiana,
House Democratic whip, describ-
ed it asb"anotherbmajor step to-
ward a balanced budget in a bal-
anced economy." Sen. Jennings
Randolph (D-W Va) said it dem-
onstrates fiscal and economic re-
sponsibility, and Chairman George
H. Mahon (D-Tex) of the House4
Appropriations Committee said it
is "a remarkable achievement."
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