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January 25, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-25

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. JANUARY 25_ 1AIIS

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY TTTFSflAV JANTTAI~V o~

A i..' 11 1cx1, a14xiN L,-AJLVj za, 1y00

I

nfODEST GOALS:
Absence of Cello'
Better Than Most

PUBLIC AWARENESS:
New Recognition Accorded
Dance as Sophisticated Art

Raincoats
cleaned, waterproof
$200
A & P 1-Hour Cleaners
312 E. Huron
Cash & Carry
668-9500

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, January25,12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center

I

SUBJECT:
"RELIGION & POLITICS IN POST-WARGERMANY"
(The role of religion in the German restoration)
Speaker: DR. JAMES POLLOCK

By PAUL SAWYER
Hans Conried, Ruth McDevitt,
and a competent cast brought a
first-rate staged television comedy
to Ann Arbor last night in Ira
1 Wallach's "The Absence of a
Cello." The play, of course, is bet-
ter than most of what passes for
entertainment on television, but
its goals-most of which are com-
petently achieved-were modest.
Its place in posterity will ulti-
mately be as one of the better high
school drama productions. Never-
theless, under the experienced
hand of some long-time pros in
the field of light comedy, it man-
aged, for two acts at least, to
present many pleasant moments.-
"Absence of a Cello" is an ex-
ample of the peculiarly American
temptation play, known as "The
Folksy Eccentric versus the Puri-
tan Ethic in all its Horrors" (that
is, personified in the form of big
business). The most popular ex-
ample of this form was, of course,
the Sycamores in "You Can't Take
It With You."
However, times have changed
since then, for the "eccentric"
family in last night's production,
in spite of what they said about
themselves, were folksy and nor-
mal enough to represent what
most of the audience probably
would like to picture themselves.
Differences
Of course, there are superficial
differences. The victim of this
particular conspiracy of The Or-
ganization is a famous (but very
folksy) physicist (Hans Conried)
who has gone broke and is now
applying for a job with a large
home appliance corporation. His
drawbacks: he loves to play the
cello, and his wife has published
five books on the sources of me-
dieval romances.
Conned and his family try their
best to put on a good front for the
company's representative - Otis
Clifton, an Anglo-Saxon Protes-
tant version of the immaculatein-
carnation - and there results a
clever series of jokes at the ex-
pense of the corporate image. For
example, jinglism ("B & N man
and wife/Lead the B & N way of
Across,
Campus
TUESDAY, JAN.25
8 a.m.-Ann Arbor Goals Con-
.ference registration in the Mihi-
gan Union.
3 p.m.-The journalism depart-
ment will present Charles W. Fer-
guson, senior editor of "eader's
Digest," speaking on "Reading as
a Metaphysical Experience" at the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
8' p.m.-PTP presents ACT in
Moliere's "Tartuffe" at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 pm.-The School of Music
'presents the University Woodwind
Quintet in Rackham Lecture Hall.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 26
4 p.m.-A Department of Zool-
ogy Seminar presents C. R. Aus-
tin of Tulane University on
"Mechanisms of Sperm Entry in-
to Eggs," at 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
7:30 p.m.-The college of engi-
neering presents Brice Carnahan
of the departments of chemical
engineering and biostatistics,
speakng on "An Introduction to
Digital Computers and the MAD
Language" in the Natural Science
Aud.
8 p.m.-PTP presents ACT in
Moliere's "Tartuffe" at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
presents the Stanley Quartet in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officiay
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Organizations who are
planning to be active for the Spring
Term must be registered in the Office
of Student Organizations by Jan. 27
1966. Forms are available in Room 1011
SAB.
University of Michigan Amateur Ra-
dio Club will hold a meeting on Wed.,
Jan. 26 in 4511 E. Engrg. at 7 p.m.
Organization of theory classes. Speaker:
Prof. Mouzon. Topic: "Antennas."
Bahai Student Group, Fireside dis-
cussion: "A Basis for Ethics?" Fri.,
Jan. 28, 8 p.m., 3545 SAB. All wel-
come.
Near East Studies Club, Lecture:
"The Humanities and the Social Sci-
ences: An Artificial Dichotomy Re-
visited," Dr. Grabar and Dr. Schorger,
Jan. 25, 8 p.m., Lane Hall.

life"); the New Rhetoric (a new
nqun, "isolate," is invented; after
all, "Why let syntax stand in the
way of progress?"); 'conformity
and mediocrity ("We don't mind
a questioning mind, but with one
restriction-that he ask the same
questions we do"), etc.
It is one of the subtler ironies
of this play (if there really are
any) that Conried himself possess-
es the genial, easy-going pragma-
tism of most Americans, while Otis
Clifton represents the darker,
m o r e ruthlessly ends - directed
pragmatism popularly associated
with the pre-Roosevelt American
business ethic.
Inevitable
And so the situation goes mer-
rily enough, until the third act,
when the inevitable happens. In
the third act of most modern
American comedies, stage and
film, the author has two tasks: to
resolve everything for the best, in
spite of all improbability of char-
acter; and to start to take your-
self seriously.
The professor's wife suddenly
realizes that she and her husband
have been "demeaning themselves"
in front of Mr. Clifton, that in
fact, they have "betrayed their
honor." The sister of the family
cooes some phrase about "You can
choose your lives, but not your
truths." Most repugnant to me
was the attempt, which generally
failed, to turn Otis into a good
guy after all so' Conried can get
the job in spite of everything.
The popular appeal of this play
lies in its ability to lampoon the
more obvious foibles of American
bourgeois status-seeking while pre-
senting to the audience a set of
characters that, in true fact, rep-
resent a similar bourgois way of
life more acceptable to all. It is
only when it tries to take itself
seriously that the play fails.

By JOHN CRUMB, JR.
A very sophisticated range of
dance styles was performed be-
fore supposedly unitiated, un-
responsive Ann Arbor audiences
last semester. Yet these perform-
ances, particularly by the Paul
Taylor Dance Company and the
Alba Reyes Spanish Dance Com-
pany, were enthusiastically at-
tended and applauded last season.
The news that dance is no long-
er a European phenomenon and
that its appreciation has penetrat-
ed t h e American continent
through the two coasts even into
the suburbs of Ann Arbor, should
have by now reached University
administrators.
"West Side Story" requires
skilled dancers, so does the Gilbert
& Sullivan Society and the Soph
Show. The Music School's Opera,
Max Reinhardt's "Rosalinda," re-
quire prima ballerinas, a tradi-
tional essential of opera.
Dance as Art
The University must think of
dance as a sophisticated art, not
just another form of physical
exercise. Like any other art, dance
is an attempt to communicate
through a medium, in this case,
the human body. Like any other
art, it demands mental effort,
perhaps more than the other per-
forming arts because of its total
involvement of the body as the
instrument of art.'
The University would do well
to support dance here. Among
other things, dance would en-
courage a further cooperation be-
tween the Music, Theatre and Art
departments of the school, now
drifting apart with the rapid phy-
sical expansion of the University.
Dance exists in dependence on
elements of all three.
"We must turn away many stu-
dents each semester," said Doctor.

Ester E. Pease, Superintendent of
Women's Phys. Ed., "because we
just don't have the facilities to
accommodatethem. The classes
we have number more than forty
students in each. We hold classes
in the halls of Barbour Gymna-
sium, which is reputed to be the
worst university phys.ed. building
in the state. It is ill-heated,, ill-
lit, ill-ventilated.
"It has no large mirrors or
ballet bars. Nor has it showers
or dressing rooms for men. And
men are essential to any effective
dance program.
It has only one room adequate
for dance rehearsals. I even hold
classes in the conference rooms.
"This building must be used by
the total Women's Phys. Ed. dept.
as well."
No Stage
The University has no stage
adequate for presentation of the
dance. The only theaters on cam-
pus that may be used by the
dancers are Lydia Mendelssohn,
Trueblood, Rackham Auditorium,
and Hill Auditorium.
Trueblood Auditorium has a
miniscule stage appropriate only

for chamber music concerts
lectures, and lacks wings.

and

Hill Auditorium has an immense
stage appropriate for orchestra
concerts, but is again with out
wings or make-up rooms and
showers. Lydia Mendelssohn and
Trueblood are drama stages built
of soft wood which splinters, with
a protruding iron-rimmed trap
door in center stage and gouges
left from stage crews. Pease said,
"Never have we performed in these
theaters but one of the dancers
was seriously hurt."
Autonomous
Dance at the University should
be autonomous from physical edu-
cation, represented on an equal
footing with the other art de-
partments.
It should have its own facilities,
its own course requirements, pro-
viding for the student who would
be a performance major, as well
as the one who would teach dance
in primary and secondary schools.
Other progressive schools like
Bennington, Juliard, Ohio State,
Indiana and Illinois have such
facilities and programs. Let Mich-
igan be next.

I

I

For reservations,
call 662-5529

U

Professor of Political Science
Sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center
IQC & ASSEMBLY
PRESENT
OBSAT F EUB 5
8:30',P.M.
Hill Auditorium
Tickets $3.50-$3.00-$2.25
BLOCK SALES JAN. 27
INDIVIDUAL SALES
Begin Jan. 31, 8:00 A.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
BOX OFFICE

MOLIERE FARCE :

'Tartuffe' Makes Debut

The American Conservatory
Theatre production of Moliere's
wild F rench farce, "Tartuffe," will
receive its Ann Arbor premiere
tonight at 8 p.m. at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. The play,
the third ACT production to be
presented by the University's Pro-
fessional Theatre Program, is the
story of a religious hypocrite who
plots to gain control over an
entire Parisian estate.
His complicated efforts and
eventual success, together with
his immediate downfall at the end
of the play, provide t he script

with a host of classic farcical sit-
uations.
The play will also give Ann
Arbor theatregoers the chance to
judge the range and scope of the
ACT Company. Following the
terse, controversial drama of "Tiny
Alice" and the biting satire of
"Beyond the Fringe-'66," a suc-
cessful production of "Tartuffe"
would be an excellent example of
the "flexibility" which William
Ball, the founder and general di-
rector of ACT, considers to be so
vital to the life of repertory thea-
tre.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN'

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 , p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25
Day Calendar
Ann Arbor Goals Conference-Regis-
tration, Michigan Union, 8 a.m.
Management Development Seminar -
"Disciplinary Process and Grievance
Handling": University Medical Cen-
ter, 8:3 Oa.m.
Management Development Seminar -
"Better Letter and Report Writing":
'Michigan Union, 1:30 p.m.
Dept. of Journalism Lecture-Charles
W. Ferguson, senior editor, Reader's
Digest, "Reading as a Metaphysical
Experience": Rackham Amphitheatre, 3
p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-American Conservatory The-
atre Company in Moliere's "Tartuffe":
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.
School of Music 'Concert-University
Woodwind Quintet: Rackham Lecture
Hall, 8:30 p.m.
Lecture I by Louis Lomax-Original-
ly scheduled for 8 p.m. at Hill Aud.
has been cancelled.
Special Lecture-Charles W. Spencer,
field engineer, Tektronix, Inc., will
speak on "Theory and Applications of
the Oscilloscope," on Tues., Jan. 25 at
7:30 p.m. in Room 1300 of the Chem-
istry Bldg.

General Notices,
5-Hour Special Topics in Chemistry.
7th Series: Dr. Hans H. Brintzinger,
University of Basel, Switzerland, will
speak on "Metal Catalyzed Reactions."
The second topic of the series will be
"Catalytic Reaction Path Involving
Insertion Reactions," to be given3on
Wed., Jan. 26, at 8 p.m. In Room 1300
of the Chemistry Bldg.
Honors Colloquium in Curriculum
and Instruction: Sponsored by the De-
partment of Curriculum and Instruc-
tion, Bbool 'of Education, for a se-
lected group of advanced ',,octoral-
students-7 p.m., West Conference
Room at Rackham. Topic: "Knowledge
Structure and the Curriculum."
Regents' Meeting: Feb. 11 (instead
of Feb. 18). Communications for con-
sideration at this meeting must be
in the President's hands not later
than Jan. 28.
Law School Admission Test: Appli-
cation blanks for the Law School Ad-
mission Test are available in 122 Rack-
ham Bldg. The next administration of
the test will be on Sat., Feb. 12, and
applications must be received in
Princeton, N.J., by Jan. 29.
National Teacher Examinations: Ap-
plication blanks are available in Room
122 Rackham Bldg. for the National
Teacher Examinations. The next ad-
ministration of the test will be on
Sat., March 19, and applications must
be received in Princeton, N.J., by
March 4.
Summer Intern in Washington: Those
students particularly interested in
working for the United States Infor-
mation Agency this summer should
contact Charles Monsma, summer in-
tern counselor, at 764-3492 immedi-
ately, as the closing date for filing
applications is Feb. 1. Applicants must
be at least juniors. Openings exist in
many fields, especially radio-TV for-
eign languages, international relations,
or any communication skill. Another
general meeting for all students in-
terested in working in Washington this
(Continued on Page 5)

MCHIGgM

2ND WEEK
Direct from its
Roadshow Engagement

PREMIRES ODAY

U

NO SEATS RESERVED
Shows at 1:15-3:50-6:30-9:00
Mats. $1.25; Eves. & Sun. $1.50

~: 20th Century-Fox
presents
hri

PTP
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM

/21'e4h te
'IN

I

A.C.T.

AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
THEATRE

I =*

COLOR BY DIE ILUXE
CINEMASCOPr:

"COMEDY HAS A NEW FREEDOM!
It swells -with joy, zest, delight in the
world! A great film! Moviegoers can re-
joice now!" -Newsweek Magazine
9@
...adhe e i t'd
THSRC1RRCM ED T RAY BROOKS MICHAEL CRAWFORD DNAI. DONNELLY

"A madly whirling carnival of rnirth!"
-Pittsburgh Press.
"Shimmering and immensely
appealing displayof style-
thundering success!"
-Pittsburgh Daily-Dispatch

"Stunningly recreated N.Y. hit!"
-Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
THE 1965 LINCOL N CENTER HIT!

In a New Version By
RICHARD WILBUR

Under the Direction of
WILLIAM BALL

. .. .

Today

1

DIAL
8-6416

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE-JAN. 25-FEB. 5
CHOICE SEATS NOW AT BOX OFFICE
Phone 668-6300

ENDING THURSDAY
Weekday Matinee ... $1.25
Evenings & Sunday . . . . $1.50

r-

~a m-

PM

IF YOU HAVE ONLY SEEN IT ONCE
YOU HAVEN'T SEEN IT AT ALL
PERE COMES THE BIGGEST BOA

university activities center announces
MUSKET66
presents

I

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W "RYS"UMN- ~NED
-STARTS FRIDAY-- FEB. 16 & 17th
DORIS DAY-ROD TAYLOR
"DO NOT DISTURB"

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APPLICATIONS FOR FRESHMAN
nREnEZVOUS COUNSELORS AVAILABLE

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