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October 23, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. OCTOBER 23, 1985

TINE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. OCTOBER 23. 1965

EMING1'fWAY STORY:
Magic Performance by Bogart
Create~s' Exciting Film- Classic

Power's Relationships to the

-IT '

By GAIL'BLUMBERG
Magazine Editor
It The Cinema Guild;
bgart fans take note - "To
ve- and Have Not" is a winner.
Faulknger screenplay with Hem-
way characters' and dialogue
w Bogart at his best.
'he indefinable magic that is
gart and Bacall earns for this
ture a place among the mem-
ble. But it doesn't even stop.
re. Hoagy Carmichael, playing
own music-you've been miss-
something if you've never
rd him-and Walter Brennan,
wing superb skill in his char-
,ex portrayal of an old fisher-
n "rummy," are just two more
sons to make this movie a must.
ogart is the Hemingway man
arnate and Harry Morgan is
ailor-made role. He is aman
ne, living by the Hemingway
e-tough, independent and re-
ing to embrace any cause, to
ke any commitment. 'He is
ningway's first hero to come
the decision that man needs
iety, that "No matter how, at

man alone ain't got
f-ing chance."

no bloodyI

Strong Faulkner Screenplay
But don't expect too much
Hemingway from this picture. If
Bogart is Harry Morgan, Harry
Morgan and his story have been
changed so that they are, even
more, Bogart. In writing this
screenplay, Faulkner retained the
basic Hemingway theme, several.
of his vivid characters and a good
chunk of Hemingway dialogue.
The rest is pure Faulkner.
The plot is only vaguely rem-
iniscent of the original, but much
simpler and highly romanticized.
Slim, played by a very young
Lauren Bacall 'n her first screen.
role, is a Faulkner addition. As
the romantic interest in the movie,
she becomes the main catalyst in
H a r r y Morgan's philisophical
transformation. The ending, in
Hollywood and Bogart tradition
is, if not immediately happy, un-
deniably optimistic.- :
U n1ik e Hemingway's Harry
Morgan, who neede a whole life
to learn: about himself and man's
position in society, the Faulkner
Morgan not only learns, but lives

to profit -from his knowledge.
Skillful Dialogue and Music
Above all, "To Have and Have
Not" wins the prize for memor-
able dialogue-most of it Faulk-
ner's.
"Walk around me," Bogart
growls. Bacall slinks around, sets
her sultry glance on his so-tough
face and purrs "I know, there are
no strings around you-yet."
The music is used very skillful-
ly, from Bacall's bass crooning, as
incredible as it is intriguirg, and
Carmichael's mellow voice swing-
ing, even by today's standards, in
highly original arrangements. It
both comments on the action and
expresses parts of the theme.
Top Entertainment
The only weak spot was the
scenery, obviously Hollywood con-
tinued, yet strangely not too out
of tune with "the picture as a
whole.
If you don't like Bogart, if you
haven't a taste for his special
brand of camp-this movie is not
for you! Stay away and leave it
to the rest-and there'll be plenty
-who'll find this film unbeatable
entertainment.

smith Pltas TNo Investigation
)f U' Professors' Activities

(Continued from Page 1)
magazine. When asked about pos-
sible Communist penetration in
the teach-in movement, he declar-
ed: 'Is it up to us to say who is a
Communist and who is not?'
"On the eve of the May 15, 1965,
meeting, Miss Greenfield asked Dr.
Rapoport whether he entertain-
ed the possibility of. changing -
even ever so/ slightly-any of his
opinions on Viet Nam as a result
of the pending exchanger He re-
plied:' 'I do not feel the govern-
ment has any case whatsoever."
Coburn Text
The complete report text on
Coburn's alleged affiliations 'fo-
lows:
"The pamphlet, 'N a tiona1
Teach-In on the Viet Nam War,'
giving the program of the May,
15, 1965, teach-in lists N. Coburn
in the mathematics department
of the University of Michigan as
a sponsor (p. 19).
"Coburn was a member of the
University of Michigan Council of
the Arts, Sciences and Profes-
sions, an organization cited as sub-
versive by the House Committee
on Nn-American Activities.
"Coburn appears in the Daily
Worker of Jan. 14, 1953, as an
academician who signed a peti-
tion in behalf of Julius and Eth-
el Rosenberg, atomic spies, who
were convicted and received the
death sentence.
HUAC Hearing'
"Coburn was summoned to ap-
pear before the House Commit-
tee on UJn-American Activities
Committee May 10, 1954. He did'
not appear. His counsel pleaded
illness.
"According to the May 8, 1948
issue of The Michigan Daily, pub-
lished by students of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, Coburn sent a
telegram, dated May 7, 41948 to
congressional leaders protesting
against the Mundt (anti-Commu-
nist) subversive activities bill.
"Coburn was active in a facul-
ty meeting held June 15, 1952 at
the University of Michigan which'
adopted a resolution protesting
the policy of the university in bar-,
ring Commynist speakers.
483-4680
O~rx CARPENTER ROAD
FREE CAR HEATERS
NOW SHOWING

Rapoport, who is listed in Who's
Who in America, is currently in
Europe attending professional con-
ferences until November. His wife
pointed out yesterday some mis-
leading statements in the subcom-
mittee's reports.
Mrs. Rapoport added that her
husband was in Europe on June
25-the date on which the sub-
committee report claimed that
Rapoport signed a, receipt for a
special delivery letter.
She commented that if anyone
is genuinely interested in her hus-
band's opinions on the subject of
Communism they should read his
books.
Letter Not Received
Prof. Richard Mann of the psy-
chology department and secretary
of the Inter-University Commit-
tee for Debate on Foreign Policy
said last night that his committee
had received the letter addressed
to Rapoport from the subcom-
mittee this summer. However, he
said a response to their request
was made even though the sub-
committee report claims that no
such response was made.
Coburn was not available for
comment.
When Dodd's subcommittee re-
port came out last Friday it was
played down by the national press.
The New York Times did not run
the story and the Washington
papers ran it on the inside pages.
One Washington' reporter ex-
plained that the news editors of
his paper did not want to run the
story prominently because they
did not want to "add fuel to a
sensitive issue.",
Others Listed
Aside from Rapoport and Co-
burn, the other people on the list
were:
-Prof. Thomas Arthur Bisson
of the intercultural studies de-
partment of- Western College for;
Women,
-Prof. Derk Bodde, an associate
professor at the University of
Pennsylvania,
-Prof. Oliver Edmund Clubb,
member of the political science
department of Columbia Univer-
sity,
-Prof. D. F. Fleming, former

(Continued from Page 1)
or indirectly interested in any
contract, purchase or sale made
for, on account or in behalf of
any such ,institution and all such
contract purchases or sales shall
be held null and void.., and it is
hereby the duty of the governor'
upon proof satisfactory of a vio-
lation of the provisions of this
section to immediately remove the
officer... offending; and the of-
fender shall be guilty of a felony."
Power says, however, that to the
best of his knowledge he has never
been informed by the University
of any possible violation of this
law.
Written Permission
Asked about getting actual writ-
ten permission to sell copyrighted
manuscripts Power said, "Well I
didn't get permission, but I know
that Vice-PresidentPierpont is
very sensitive to these matters
and this (arrangement) was all
cleared through him when I was
elected a Regent."
"This arrangement was suggest-
ed to me, I didn't suggest it," says
Power.'
The second new development
between the microfilming com-
pany and the library is the un-
dergraduate shelflist, which was
basically the work of the Assistant
Director and Bibliographer of the
Library R.C. Stewart. The ex-
haustive task of selecting books
for the Undergraduate Library be-
gan in 1955. Stewart and several
assistants went through approxi-
mately 400,000 prospective titles
to aid in the selection of 40,000
books for the original Undergrad-
uate Library collection.
Upon completion the Univer-
sity's Undergraduate L i b r a r y
shelflist of books was recognized
as one of the finest in the nation.
In 1958 University Microfilms
copied the shelflist.
In the company plant all the
catalogue cards which together
comprise the undergraduate shelf-
list were filmed. Each April since
then, the shelflist is updated by
filming all additions to the under-
graduate shelflist.
The shelflist can be purchased
in card catalogue form for $1,900,
in a book form for $875 and on
microfilm for $100.
Save Expenses
? New libraries desiring to save
the research and expense involved
in developing their own shelflist
can save money by buying the
University of Michigan shelflist
for their own use.
By way of comparison, the G.K.
Hall Company in Boston also cop-
ies library shelflists in specific
fields. The, shelf list is sold to
clients in book form.
A royalty on books sold is paid
by the Hall Company to the li-
brary involved.. University Micro-
films pays no royalties.
According to a spokesman for
the Library of Congress, micro-
filming companies may copy cata-
logue cards from the Library of
Congress. However all the work is
cone by the Library of Congress
at a fee of one and one-half cents
per card.
When Harvard University com-
pleted its Lamont shelflist, the
project was reprinted by the Har-
vard Press.

With respect to the royalty
question, Power. contends that, "If
we (University Microfilms) paid a
royalty we would have to enter
into a contractural agreement
with the University." He indicat-
ed that he felt this could be in
violation of the state law prohib-
iting Regents from entering into
contracts with the University.
Advertisement
A University Microfilms adver-
tisement that has appeared in
many magazines and brochures
advertises the product as the
"University of Michigan Shelflist."
According to University Attor-
ney E. A. Cummiskey the name
of the University cannot be used
without the prior consent of the
University. In the academic area
this would necessitate the consent
of the vice-president for academic
affairs."
"Any breach of this ruling
would first have to be determined
by the Regents. They are the
final authority. No legal action
can be brought in the name of
the University without the prior
authorization of the Regents,"
Cummiskey said.
University Permission
As of now the company has not
even requested University permis-
sion to advertise the product as
"The University of M i c h i g a n
Shelf list."
Moreover the same advertise-
ment fails to give proper credit
for financing the shelflist pro-
ject. An advertisement which has
appeared in many magazines and
phamplets says the shelf list was
developed "with funds provided by
a foundation grant."
"The advertisement is in error,"
Wagman. explained. Actually the
shelflist was financed with Uni-
versity funds.
"I meant to mention this to
Power," Wagman added, "but for-
got to. It is a minor mistake."
Asked about the advertisement
Power explained that he did not
know of the ruling, "I never heard
of the rule." He said he plans to
verify if such a ruling exists.
No Consent
While Power did not obtain
consent for the use of the Uni-
versity's name in the advertise-
ments, he did obtain permission,
to place University Microfilm
cameras in the Undergraduate
Library.
Before Power became a Regent
he had several cameras in the
basement of the Graduate Library
which were used to microfilm
University books. University Mic-
rofilms also let the library use
the cameras at no charge to mic-
r6iohd i library materials..
When Power became a Regentl
he did not mention these camerasI

in his letter to the Attorney Gen-
eral but on his own volition he
removed the cameras from the
library. In the place the cameras
once occupied, the University es-
tablished its own library photo-
duplication service.
Cameras Removed
Why did Regent Power remove
his cameras?
"Because," Wagman explained,
"in 1956 when Power was elected
a Regent we decided our relation-
ship with Power would become
much more formal.
"At the same time Regent Pow-
er, because of the attorney gen-
eral's opinion could no longer film
University of Michigan disserta-
tions for a fee. We (the library)
decided to build our own labora-
tory (to film dissertations and
other materials). It kept things
nice and clean and above board."
Then why did Wagman invite
Power to return his cameras to
a place in the library in 1964.
"My thinking varied," Wagman
explained.
Service to Othersy
"The reason the camera was
put in was because I suggested to
Regent Power that since our shelf-
list (the University of Michigan
shelflist sold by University Micro-
films) was used as an acquisition
tool and since a lot of libraries
would want copies of books in our
library that were listed in the
shelf list it would be a service to
him and other libraries if he
could produce wanted copies of
out-of-print books."
"At the same time it would be
worthwhile for him to do this from
a business point of view. In order
to do this (copying of shelflist
bools) he had to use the UGLI
and it would be a lot simpler to
stick cameras in the UGLI," Wag-
man said.
"It's a normal;relationship and
we watch very carefully to see
that no one is hurt," Wagman
added.
"Actually having the cameras in
there is an advantage for us,"
Wagman said. He explained that
it saves the wear and tear in-
volved in shipping books back and
forth between the library and the
plant and shortens . the period
when they are out of the library.
Not Otherwise Available
Having cameras in the library,
allows University Microfilms to
microfilm books that might not:
otherwise be available to them.
The University library does ex-
tensive loaning of books for micro-
filming, to o t h e r companies'
throughout the country.
However, certain reference and
research books, books in fragile
condition and certain periodicals
cannot leave the library. By hav-

ing a camera in the library Uni-
versity Microfilms can film these
books.
Wagman said that he would be
happy to let any other microfilm-
ing company enjoy the privilege,
enjoyed by University Microfilms.
If they wanted to put cameras in
the library for the same purpose
he would let them.
Experience and Equipment
Regent Power said the micro-
film company had two cameras in
the library before 1956 because,
"We were doing filming for the
University for which they paid us.
University Microfilms had the ex-
perience and the equipment to do
the job.
"Now as I recall we took the
cameras out when I became a Re-
gent. because the library couldn't
pay for work done by University
Microfilms. This would have been
a violation of the state law on
conflict of interest."
Several employes of University'
Microfilms are actually involved
in withdrawing books from the
University library. U
Normally at UGM
Normally undergraduate library
books, Wand reference: books are
microfilmed in the UGLI 'facility.
Most of the books withdrawn by
University Microfilms from other
divisions are taken by truck to
the company's plant in Ann Arbor.
"You should see the lineup at
the end of the day when they are
checking out. We have to give
them a special oversized cart," a
library employee commented.
Noting that "University Micro-
films has drawn heavily upon the
resources of the University Li-
brary," Stewart said that, "Uni-
versity Microfilms has naturally
benefitted from us."
Some Problems
As might be expected with such
a big operation there are occasion-
al problems. For .example one
book was withdrawn from the
graduate reserve room last Feb.-
ruary for University Microfilms.
In June the book still had not been
returned.
Stewart pointed out that the
library gets a free copy of the
book, or any number of copies it
desires when it is microfilmed by
University Microfilms. This is ap-
parently standard practice among
microfilm companies.
Some rank and file library em-
ployees feel animosity toward Uni-
versity Microfilms.
"We feel we're being exploited,".
one employee claimed.
"The most.amazing thing is their
name.
"Pegple see ;the name and ad-
dress and assume the company is
part of the University. I am sure
a vast segment of the public

The confusion created by the
microfilming company's name has
diminished somewhat in recent
years since University Microfilms
became University Microfilms In-
corporated.
A company official said the
name describes the nature of the
material supplied and its custom-
ers.
Subsidiary
In 1962 University Microfilms
became a fully owned subsidiary
of Xerox Corporation. In purchas-
ing the company Xerox exchang-
ed stock with the owners of Uni-
versity microfilms.
How does library director Wag-
man regard the University's rela-
tionship with University Micro-
films?
Speaking frankly, he said, "We
get much more from University
Microfilms than we give them."
He estimated that University
Microfilms has donated about
$150,000 worth of microfilming
services over the past 10 years.
"Regent Powerhas never said
no to any of our requests."
"His is an enlightened business
and in the process libraries in-
variably cooperate with these pro-
jects."
"The whole idea is to make
books widely available." He ex-
plained that University 'Micro-
films many projects, such as pre-
serving decaying books and mak-
ing out of print books readily
available, have been a valuable
service.
Praise for Company
Wagman is full of praise for
University Microfilms calling the
company, "exceedingly progres-
sive," and adding that "they have
made great contributions to scho-
larly research."
Wagman's viewpoint is shared
by an executive at University
Microfilms who describes his firm
as "A commercial enterprise active
in the field of education."
"The University of Michigan has
a very progressive. library, and
has shared much with us."
According to Power, "There
isn't a month that goes by that a
number of people say 'I wish you
weren't a Regent,' because we
need what you've got but we are
not able to pay for it and we are
unwilling to ask you to donate It.' "
."We recognize that the Univer-
sity must have the benefit of the
services we offer and we must
make them available. We make
them available often at very sub-
stantial sacrifices in order that
the University not be penalized
because I am a Regent," Power
concluded.

thinks they are dealing
University not a private
tion," he added.

research professor of internation-
al relations at Vanderbilt Univer-
sity,
-Waldo Frank, author,
--Prof. Robert J. Havighurst, of
the education department of Uni-
versity of Chicago,
-Dr. Halstead Reid Holman,
chairman of the department of
medicine at Stanford University,
-Matthew Josephson, author,
-Prof. Thomas I. Emerson of
the Yale Law School.
-Sidney Lens, union official
and author,
-Prof. Oliver S. Loud of An-
tioch College,
-Prof. Helen Lynd of the phi-
losophy department of Sarah
Lawrence College,
-Prof. Robert S. Lynd of the,
sociology department of Colum-
bia University,
-Prof. Staughton Lynd of the
history department at Yale+ Uni-
versity,
-Prof. Harry Magdorff of the
economics department of the New
School,
--Prof. John Somerville of the
philosophy department of Hunter
College,
-Prof. Philip Morrison' of the
physics department of .Cornell
University,
-Melba Phillips of the Physics
department of the University. of
Chicago,
-Anton Refregier, artist,
-Prof. Theodor Rosebury of the
bacteriology department at Wash-
ington University in St. Louis, and
-Prof. Harry Slochower of the
chology department of the New
School.

with the
corpora-

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DIAL
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"'THE IPCRUES S FILE' IS A
T HIKNGM N'S GOLOFINGER'
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SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 P.M.

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HELD OVER!
3RD HIT WEEK!
"YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO
MISS IT!" -New r r-

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The University of Michigan
The New York University

Men's Gee Club and

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35 SOt4 HISTS
SiLRCI Fl ZSI*
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EA TI4AN COfLOR x3ar
Pius The An ics Of ,
ARNOLD STAVAO AR PIW
KUNfl HALL '~f
LEO GORCCEY t""i~
ADDED LAUGH HIT
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Starring,
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LAUREN BACALL
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