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October 23, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-23

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)CTOBER 23, x965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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)CTOBER 23, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAIlY US £ i' ~. PY~S~~US ~

YA,(aiE TIIREE

Klansman
Of Rig ht'

Acquitted
Murder

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Klan 'Kiud'

RecantIs

And Tells of Threats

FBI Expert
Names Gun
In Murder
Informer Testifies
Wilkims Had Emptied
Pistol in Liuzzo's Car
HAYNEVILLE, Ala. (P) - A
young klansman, on trial for the
murder of a civil rights worker,
was acquitted yesterday after one
hour and 45 minutes of jury de-
liberation.
The klansman, - Collie Leroy
Wilkins, Jr., 21, a Fairfield, Ala.,
auto mechanic, left the courtroom
without commenting on the ver-
dict. He smiled broadly and puff-
ed rapidly on a cigarette.
The state had rested its case
in the second trial of Wilkins
aftr an FBI ballistics expert tes-
tified that bullets which killed a
white civil rights worker were fir-
ed from a gun introduced as evi-
dence.
The gun, a 38-caliber Smith
and Wesson revolver, was identi-
fied Thursday by an FBI Inform-
er as the one used to kill Viola
Gregg Liuzzo last March 25.
Defense attorney Arthur J.
Hanes called 10 witnsses and rest-
ed his case after about an hour.
Hanes attempted to discredit much
of ithe testimony of the state's
principal witnesses and to place
Wilkins in Bessemer, Ala., at about
9 o'clock on the night that Viola
Gregg Liuzzo, 39, a white Detroit
housewife, was killed.
Marion E. Williams of the FBI
crihiinal laboratory in Washing-
ton, said markings on a bullet
taken from Mrs. Liuzzo's head and
test bullets fired from the pistol
bore similar markings.
Williams said empty cartridge
cases found a half-mile from Mrs.
Liuzzo's car on U.S. Highway 80
in Lowndes County also were from
the same gun.
Gary Thomas Rowe, 38, a klans-
man who turned FBI informer,
testified Thursday that Wilkins
emptied a pistol into Mrs. Liuzzo's
car after a nighttime high-speed
auto chase on the highway.
Williams testified that at least
five bullets struck Mrs. Liuzzo's
car and that three, including the
one which killed her, were recov-
ered.
During a lengthy session, Rowe,
th state's key witness, said an-
other klansman, Eugene Thomas,
had handed the pistol to Wilkins
before the shooting took place.
In cross-examination, Hanes
questioned Williams on the bul-
lets fired into Mrs. Liuzzo's car.
Hanes, using a diagram, attempt-
ed to show that bullets might
have also struck a passenger seat-
ed in the car.
Mrs. Liuzzo was traveling with
a Negro civil rights worker when
she was killed.
All three Klan defendants also
are under deferal indictment on
civil rights charges because of the
Liuzzo slaying.
Wilkins' trial reached the jury
after three days' testimony. Hanes
completed his presentation in mid-
morning after calling 10 witness-
es, mainly to impeach the testi-
mony of key prosecution witnesses.
Atty. Gen. Richmond Flowers,
who prosecuted Wilkins, said two
other Klan members, also indict-
ed for the Liuzzo slaying, will be
tried despite the acquittal of the
first defendant.
The klansmen still awaiting trial
are Eugene Thomas, 42, a Besse-
mer, Ala., steel company employe,
and William Orville Eaton, 41, a
retired steel worker also of Bes-
semer.

IndoArmy
Ordered To
Halt Action
Reports No Military
Let-Up Following Last
Week's Coup Attempt
JAKARTA, Indonesia (P)-Pres-
ident Sukarno ordered his armed
forces chiefs yesterday to halt
destructive reprisals and to end
racialism, reference to growing
anti-Red Chinese sentiment.
The order appeared aimed
mainly at the army's roundup of
thousands of Communists and the
burning of Indonesian Communist
party offices by Moslem and oth-
er demonstrators.
Recently, demonstrations have
taken an anti-Chinese turn since
many Indonesians believe Peking
backed the Communist-influenced
coup against Sukarno Oct. 1.
. Night-Long Meeting
Sukarno's order was issued after
a night-long meeting of KOTI,
the supreme operations command,
attended by all the chiefs of the
armed forces.
Reports of burning of Commu-
nist offices continued, and there
was no indication the army was
ready to let up in its campaign
against the Communists.
It has been his policy to bal-
ance off the Indonesian Commu-
nist party-the largest outside a
non-Communist land-against the
armed forces.
Recently the president told vis-
iting Japanese correspondents that
some units of the army, air force
and his presidential guards had
been involved in the coup as well
as Communists.

1i -,I

Pay Raise, Sugar Bill Pass as
Congress Nears Adjournment

WORSHIP

WASHINGTON OP)-Swift ac-
tion on a pay raise for federal
workers and on sugar quota legis-
lation moved Congress within
hours of adjournment last night.
After less than an hour's de-
bate, the Senate gave 67-0 passage
to a pay boost of 3.6 per cent for
1.8 million civilian employes-at
an estimated annual cost of $641.51
million..
While this was far above the
$400-million increase requested by
the administration, President Lyn-
don Johnson is expected to sign
it since it is a deep cutback from
the House bill to give a four per
cent raise this year and another
hike next year at an estimated
annual cost of $1.55 billion.
Accept
The House was reported ready
to accept the scaled-down Senate
proposal because' of the threat ofj
a presidential veto of its proposal.
Senate and House conferees
agreed on a sugar-quota bill set-
ting market allotments for five
years-a triumph for Rep. Harold
D. Cooley (D-NC), chairman of
the House Agriculture Committee.
Senate conferees had wanted the
much-disputed foreign nation.
quotas set for only two years.
Before winding up action on the
last bills, the Senate confirmed
the nomination of David G. Bress
as United States attorney for the
District of Columbia by a 49-14
vote.
Minor
Normally confirmation of suchl
a relatively minor nomination is'
a routine affair but this time
there was a three-hour debate
marked by a fresh flare-up over
the Bobby Baker case.

Baker quit his job as secretary
of the Senate's Democratic ma-
jority after his outside business
activities had been questioned.
These activities became the sub-
ject of a prolonged investigation
by the Senate Rules Committee.
In 10 and one half months, this
first session of the 89th Congress
blazed new legislative trails as it
implemented about 85 per cent of
what Johnson calls his "Great
Society" program.
Even so,s the funds approved
were $2.4 billion below White
House requests.
Major
The major breakthroughs scor-
ed by the heavy Democratic ma-
jorities in both chambers--with
some Republican help-came on
health care for the elderly and aid
to elementary schools.
Elsewhere in the health field
Congress approved an $800-million
program for community health
centers; a three-year, $755-million
educating physicians, dentists and
educating physicians, dentists and
nurses; and a four-year, $650-
million program to build regional
research-treatment centers to
fight cancer, heart disease and
strokes.
School Aid
In addition to providing across-
the-board aid to elementary
schools--including parochial-tor
the first time, the 89th voted
greatly increased assistance to
higher education. Over-all first-
year cost is about $2 billion for
the two.
In' extensions of earlier pro-
grams, it voted to double anti-
poverty expenditures to $1.65 bil-
lion; provide $1.1 billion for aid

to the Appalachia regions and
$3.2 billion for development of
other depressed areas: and it en-
acted a four-year $7-billion public
housing program expected to in-
clude rent subsidies for low-
income families next year.
The Congress also wiped out the
national-origins immigration quo-
tas which favored northern Euro-
pean nations and offended some
others.
Workers To
Be Repaid
WASHINGTON (R)-Labor De-
partment figures show that 406,333"
workers were short-changed a to-
tal of $74.45 million wages in fis-
cal 1965, by employers violating
federal pay standards.
A spokesman said yesterday,
some employers had agreed to pay
over $24 million in back wages
and overtime, but that the other
$50 million is still tied up in nego-
tiation or litigation.
The report on investigations
under the Fair Labor Standards
Act will not be officially made
public until Secretary of Labor W.
Willard Wirtz makes his annual
report to Congress next January.
A department spokesman said
that while some of the back wages
may never be paid due to legal
technicalities, the important re-
sult was that employers caught
violating the law generally start
paying the proper wage levels im-
mediately.

WASHINGTON P) - One re-
canting Klansman told of a veiled
death threat and another resign-
ed from the Klan in the witness
chair in dramatic moments yes-
terday of the congressional in-
quiry into the hooded order.
Roy Woodle, a bricklayer from
Lexington, N.C., who identified
himself as a former Klan klud
(chaplain) pointed to a man in
the hearing room as a Klan offi-
cial who once warned him he

had "authority to do away with
me."
Joseph G. DuBois,, a used car
dealer in Goldsboro, N.C., declar-
ed his resignation from the Klan
while testifying before the House
Committee on Un-American Ac-
tivities. He said he believed God
and his country should come be-
fore any Klan vows.
Woodle said he belonged to the
Klan for about 10 months and re-
signed about five weeks ago when,

Special Forces Continue To
Resist Viet Cong at Plei Me

SAIGON P)-Sporadic firing re-
j sumed yesterday near the special
forces camp at Plei Me and the
American-advised troops braced
for another attack by a Viet Cong
assault force they have held off
for three days.
In the second such reinforce-
ment in 24 hours, a detachment
of Vietnamese rangers flew in to
bolster the ordinary garrison of
300 Montagnard tribal irregulars
and 10 or 12 United States Spe-
cial Forces merr.
Official sources said losses with-
in the camp remained light, but
Communist gunners downed two
of, the fleet of U.S. planes strik-
irg at Red lines in support of the
garrison.
These were a Skyraider fighter-
bomber and a Canberra jet bomb-
er. The airmen were reported res-
cued.
Two helicopter crashes there
earlier in the week had killed
eight Americans.
U.S. pilots braved heavy fire in
the central highlands sector 210
miles northeast of Saigon and re-
supplied the Plei Me camp in the
first major air drop since Wed-

nesday. Officers said the shoot-
ing subsided late in the day, then
resumed after dusk.
Guerrilla losses seemed to be
mounting. With 90 enemy dead of-
ficially counted, fresh reports from
the scene said bodies littered a
field a few hundred yards north
of the camp. These were presum-
ed to have been hit in the aerial
strafing and bombing.
U.S. officials said they believed
an American construction work-
er, Joseph L. Dodd, 24, of Paoli,
Okla., has been kidnaped by the
Viet Cong. He disappeared Oct.
13.
Dodd was a mechanic for a
United States firm which is work-
ing under a contract with the U.S.
government on a. new port at
Cam Rahn Bay, 190 miles north-
east of Saigon.
U.S. Marines operating in the
Qui Nhon area ambushed a Viet
Cong force and reported they had
killed 11 without losses of their
own.
A spokesman said 11 others had
been killed by Marines in the Chu
Lai and Da Nang sectors farther
north.,

he said someone began circulat-
ing stories that he had been put
into the Klan by the government
to "tear it up."
According to the stories that he
got, Woodle said, "I got on this!
platform at a rally in Trenton,
N.C., and said something about
Mr. Shelton, so I had to go down."
Woodle said he insisted that he
had never said anything about
Imperial Wizard Robert M. Shel-
ton or anyone else, but no one
would give him any more details.
Telephoned
He said a friend telephoned him
to say that a Klan official he
identified as Boyd Hamby was
going to call him.
Chairman Edwin E. Willis (D-
La) asked if the caller threatened
him with "bodily harm."
"I don't know if you call it
bodily harm or not," said Woodle,
"but he said he had the author-
ity to do away with me."
When Willis asked Woodle if
Boyd Hamby was in the room,
Woodle turned and pointed out a
swarthy man with a mustache sit-
ting smiling in the front row of
the spectator seats.
Not Threatened
But Woodle said that Hamby
had not actually threatened his
life.
DuBois, who said he was treas-
urer of the Goldsboro Klan Klav-
ern, turned over records and docu-
ments of his unit to the commit-
tee which had subpoenaed them.
"I have no intention to take
the Fifth Amendment no matter
what," he said.
Later he told newsmen "only
a Communist takes the Fifth
Amendment or someone with
something to hide."
The Klan leaders had used the
Fifth Amendment's protection
against self-incrimination in re-
fusing to answer questions or turn
over records to the committee.

12:10

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
Pastor: Henry O. Yoder
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00,a.m.-Worship Services.
7:00 p.m. - "The Place of the Church in
Education"-Dr. Robert Long, Wittenberg
University.
WEDNESDAY
9:00 p.m.-Bible Study.
10:00 p.m.-Vespers.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
Msgr. Bradley, Rev. Litka, Rev. Ennen
SUNDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:15, 10:45,
12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00,
9:00, 11:30 a.m. and 12:00 and 5:00
p.m. Confessions following masses.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m. - Evening Mass.
Confessions following
SATURDAY-Confessions: 3:30-5:00; 7:30-
9:00 p.m.
DARLINGTON LUTHERAN CHURCH
(Wisconsin Synod)
3545 Packard-Phone 662-9247
Rev. R. A. Baer-761-1486
Sunday Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
For transportation call Rev. Baer.
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
CHURCH
meeting temporarily at 1131 Church St.
Pastor T. J. Rasmussen
Sabbath School 9:30 (Saturday)
Worship Service 11:00 (Saturday)

ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 N. Division-Phone 665-0606
SUNDAY
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion and Sermon
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion and Sermon
(Folk Mass)
(Breakfast at Canterbury House after 9:00
services)
11:00 a.m. Holy Communion and Sermon
(Folk Mass)
7:00 p.m. Evening Prayer (Chapel)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion
FRIDAY

Holy Communion

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron at Fletcher
Pastors: Malefyt and Van Hoven
9:10 a.m.-Collegiate Coffee.
9:30 a.m.-Collegiate Discussion Group.
10:30 a.m.-Sermon: "John The Baptist" by
Rev. Malefyt.
5:45 p.m.-An open discussion: "A Univer-
sity Student Looks at Death."
7:00 p.m.-Evening Worship and Discussion
with Dr. John Alexander, Director of In-
ter-Varsity Christian Fellowship, Topic:
"Communication w i t h the Academic
World."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
G. Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 & 12:00
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Services at 9:30 and 11:15 a~m.-"My Name
Is Jeremiah," Reverend Terry N. Smith.
Church School-9:30 a.m.-Crib-9th grade;
11:15 a.m.-Crib-6th grade.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST
CHURCH
1131 Church Street Phone 761-0441
Rev. Jesse Northweather
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Service at 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service at 7:30 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Wastenow Ave.
For transportation call 662-4018
9:30 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 20 years of age
1 :00 a.m.-Sunday morning church service
infant care curing service.
11:00 a.m.--Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 6 years of age.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty, open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.;
Monday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH &
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone NO 2-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services, Dr.
Rupert: "What Are the Limits of Love?"
10:15 a.m.-Christion Social Concerns Class,
Pine Room. Panel of students on Viet Nam
demonstrations and sit-ins.
7:00 p.m. T- Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. The Rev. Philip Doster: "The Work
of the Detroit Industrial Mission."
TUESDAY
12:00-1:00 p.m.-Luncheon Discussion Class,
Pine Room. "Communist Faith-Christian
Faith." Lunch 25c.
5:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations Group,
Green Room. Dinner and Program: The
Rev. Frank Dennis, Director of Camping
and Conferences of the Detroit Conference
of the Methodist Church. Reservations
needed.
8:30 p.m.-Open House, Charles Bearden's
Wesley Foundation apartment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Sup-
per and program: Mr. David Kasambira,
student in Social Work, "Rhodesia Today
and Tomorrow."
6:00 p.m.-- Catholic-Protestant Discussion,
Father Richard Center. Supper and panel
on problems of the church with Dr. Ran-
som, Father Litka and others. Reservations
needed.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m. - Young Marrieds, Pine Room.
Supper and hayride. Reservations needed.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw
Erwin A. Goede, Minister
SUNDAY
Church School and Service at 9:00 and 11:30
a.m.-Sermon Subject: "What We Leave
Behind."
Church School and Adult Discussion Group at
10:15 a.m.-Topic: "The Wild Duck."
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Rev. E. R. Klaudt, Rev. A. C. Bizer,
& Rev. A. G. Habermehl, Pastors
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
& FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 & 512 E. Huron 663-9376
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m.-Campus Discussion Class. "The
Secular City." Chapter V.
11:00 a.m.-Worship-First Baptist Church,
7:00 p.m.-Speaker: Dr. Paul Stagg. Topic:
"Evangelism in the New World."

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Gov. Wallace Blocked in Re-Election Attempt

By The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala.-A con-
stitutional amendment w h ic h
would have allowed Gov. George
C. Wallace to succeed himself in
office was beaten yesterday in a
final showdown vote in the state
Senate. Wallace forces fell 3 votes
short of the necessary 21 votes.
It was seen as a major political
setback for Wallace, who- called
the Legislature into special ses-
sion to consider the bitterly fought
succession issue.
LONDON-Prime Minister Har-

CAPE KENNEDY-The Gemini
6 astronauts sailed through final
major physical checks yesterday
and were pronounced ready to go
as Monday's date neared for their
historic rendezvous mission in
space.
* * *
KEY WEST, Fla. - Refugees
are leaving Cuba by the hundreds
but many of them are the very
old, the very young or the in-
firm.
Fifty-three refugees arrived in
the first three boats to dock in
Key West. Seven others were
brought in by a Coast Guard cut-

who said he saw service in Viet
Nam, walked out of a pacifist
meeting at the University of Iowa,
recently and about half the au-
dience of 300 followed him.
One of those who didn't was
Stephen Smith, 20, sophomore
from Marion, Iowa, who publicly
burned what he said was his draft
card Wednesday.
Two FBI agents arrested Smith
yesterday on a warrant 'charging
him with destroying his draft card.
* * *
MANCHESTER, N.H. - A U.S.
commissioner asked United States
District Court in Concord yester-

blocked peak-hour traffic for more
than an hour in two of Sydney's
busiest streets. -
The demonstration was orga-
nized by the Viet Nam Action
Committee, formed by student
groups and "peace organizations."
Australia has sent an infantry
battalion-about 800 men - to
fight on the side of the South Viet-
namese.
UNITED NATIONS - Pakistan
asked yesterday morning the UN
Security Council to hold an ur-
gent meeting to move ahead to-
ward solution of the Indian-Paki-

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Roy V. Palmer, Minister

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor
9:45 a.m.--Sundoy School.
1 1:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Training Hour.
7:00 p.m.-Gospel Service.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Nursery facilities at all services.
If it's Bible you want, come to Grace Bible-
Fundamental, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.

SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services--Call

C~AAPUS CH.APEL

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Avenue

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