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July 02, 1964 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1964-07-02

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 1964

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. JULY 2. 19~4

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MEETING GROUND
Cites Philosophy.
Linguistics Bond

The philosopher may think in
terms of the language of the com-
puter in order to determine the
validity of certain ideas, Prof. Ar-
thur W. Burks of the philosophy
department said yesterday.
Speaking at a lecture of the
Linguistics Forum lecture series,.
Prof. Burks discussed several
areas in which philosophers and
linguists have a common meet-
ing ground,
The traditional "if-then" argu-
ment used in logic may or may
not be valid, he explained, de-
pending on whether the premises
are connected by a law of logic
or by accident.
Break Down, Analyze
The philosopher-linguist is con-
cerned with modeling arguments
so as to preserve their validity,
Prof. Burks noted. One way of
doing this is to break down and
analyze what information is need-
ed in the argument, much as the
input into a computer is broken
down and analyzed.
Another function of philosophy!
in linguistics is to make a dis-
tinction between statements of fact.
and statements which are part of
an act for which the actor as-1
sumes responsibility, he explained.1
For example, the marriage vow,
when taken in the context of the1
ceremony, is not a statement ofE
the way things are, but is part
of the doing of an action.;
No Responsibility
In contrast to human use of
language in this sense is the "lan-
guage" of bees which is used by
them to communicate the location{
of sources of food. Questioning
whether this is an appropriate
use of the word language, Prof.
Burks pointed out that no notion]
of responsibility is involved.
A third concern of philosophers7
with respect to linguistics is what]
a "sign" may mean. Prof. Burks;
named three kinds of meanings:
-Icons symbolize objects by
being similar to them.;
-Indices are words which sig-I

PROF. ARTHUR W. BURKS
nify time, place or other locating
characteristics of a concept.
The philosopher's interest in
the meaning of words in different
kinds of situations can be related
to similar problems in linguistics,
Prof. Burks concluded. His inter-
est provides an arena for fruitful
interaction between philosophers
and linguists.
'Pakistanis Win
'Best'.Award
The University's chapter of the
Pakistan Students Association of
America was named the "best
local chapter," Badar Kadri, '64L,
president of the local club, an-
nounced recently.
The award, presented at the As-
sociation's convention in New Jer-
sey, is given for excellence in
general activities.

New Courses
In Zoology
Successful'
By KAREN WHITBECK
The two unique five-week inter-
session zoology courses, Zoology
101-general zoology-and 252-
vertebrate anatomy and develop-
ment-finished successfully June
19, according to Prof. Dugald E.
Brown, chairman of the depart-
ment.
The two courses were offered in
the time before the regular sum-
mer session to alleviate some of
the backlog of students desiring
the courses. Shortage of laboratory
space during the regular semes-
ters has beant that many of these
students could not take these and
similar courses.
Two sections of approximately
20 students each registered for
each of the four-credit courses.
Class met six hours a day, four
days a week, Brown said.
Spring Semester
Classes began May 18, the first
Monday after spring semester
finals. Prof. Lawrence Stuart lec-
tured for 101 and Prof. J. Graham
taught 252.
Due to the limited amount of
time, the approach to both courses
was somewhat different than that
during a fifteen week semester,
Brown explained.
The emphasis was upon synthe-
sis of the material and under-
standing whole units. A great deal
of memorization was still required,
but much of the strain and repe-
tition was eliminated by the in-
tensity of the study, he said. He
feels that this procedure brought
out the essential relationships and
saved learning unrelated details.
Fast-Moving, Intensive
Brown pointed out that this
fast-moving, intensive coverage
would not work for many sub-
jects, but that it was particularly'
good for certain natural sciences
because intensive study clarifies
relationships that are otherwise
easily overlooked or laboriously
memorized, This clarification
makes possible seasonal field work.
According to a student in 252,
most students enjoyed the course,
did not become bored, even though
this was the only course they had,
because so much new material was
introduced.
Brownsaid that because of the
success of these two courses the
department would continue to of-
fer them in six-week sessions in
the summer, even after the be-
ginning of tri-term.
That Haircut

SRC To Make Special
Voter Behavior Studies

PROF. GEORGE A. PEEK

Peek Accepts
Arizona Post
Prof. George A. Peek of the
political science department has
announced that he is leaving the
University, effective Sept. 1, to
accept a similar post at Arizona
State University.
He commented that he did not
want to miss a "good opportunity
at a new and growing institution."
Peek has been a speaker for
many groups around campus in
his stay at the University and is
well known in the campus com-
munity. He came to the University
in 1948 and had reached the rank
of full professor by 1957.

Candidates and voters are not
the only parties who will be close-
ly observing the coming elections.
The University's Institute for
Social Research has received
$165,000 grant from the Carnegie
Corporation of New York to study
the 1964 elections.
Special attention will be given
to studying the participation of
Negroes as voters and to other in-
fluences of the conflict over civil
rights, Prof. Angus Campbell, di-
rector of the ISR's Survey Re-
search Center, which will make
the study, has explained.
Thewsurvey will be based on in-
terviews with a national sample of
the electorate, to be interviewed
in October and re-interviewed in
November, immediately after the
election. The year's study will
continue a long-range program of
analyzing the American electorate
which the Center began in 1948.
Pointing out that the main pur-
pose of the study is to analyze
the factors that determine voter
choice, rather than predict the
outcome of the election, Prof.
Campbell noted the possible ef-
fects of foreign affairs, such as
the Korean War in the 1952 elec-
tion, as well as domestic issues.

television, as potential carriers of
information to many people, may
influence opinion as well as sup-
ply information, Prof. Campbell
said.
Another factor that can sway
elections, past election studies
have shown, is the shifting of un-
committed and neutral voters.
Prof. Campbell has found in ear-
lier studies that these uncommit-
ted voters tend to shift in a group
to one side or the other.
A series of indirect questions
dealing with many areas that
could be relevant to voter choice
will be used in the survey. Prof.
Campbell noted that this tech-
nique provides more information
than would blunt questions about
how the respondent plans to vote.
Hospital Sets
$19.9 Million
'64-'65 Budget
The University Hospital has de-
cided on a record-breaking budg-
et of $19.9 million for 1964-65,
marking an increase of $1.2 mil-
lion over last year.
Seventy per cent of the cost goes
into salaries for the hospital's 3200
regular employes. Associate Direc-
tor Ernest Laetz says salaries were
raised an average of 4.5 per cent
as of July 1.
The hospital is paying more em-
ployes and more highly skilled
employes than ever before. Two
out of every five have a "pro-
fessional" specialty, Laetz said.
On the average, seven new posi-
tions per month were added to the
organization during the past year
while the payroll rose to one mil-
lion dollars per month.
More than 400 of the University
Medical Center's 650 doctors re-
ceive salaries from the hospital.
Laetz estimated that it costs
more than $2000 per hour to oper-
ate the 1000-bed hospital - 24
hours per day-365 days per year.

By CHRISTINE LINDER
The vision of hell in modern
literature is drawn from human
experience-in death camps, wars
and separation from other men's
sympathy, David W. K. Sumner
of the English department told a
book discussion group recently.
The noon luncheon session was
sponsored by the Office of Reli-
gious Affairs.
Unlike older conceptions of hell.
which are based on an afterlife,
the modern versions portray a sit-
uation which is of man's own mak-
ing and with which he must cope
alone, Sumner explained.
Lawrence, Eliot, Fitzgerald
The modern industrial land-
scape, as in D. H. Lawrence's "Sons
and Lovers," T. S. Eliot's "The
Wasteland"'and F. Scott Fitzger-
ald's "The Great Gatsby," pro-
vides the oppressive environment
in which modern versions of hell
are enacted, he noted.
Another aspect of modern dis-
cussions of hell is found in the'
emphasis on the breakdown of
interpersonal relationships, as in
Jean Paul Sartre's "No Exit."
Sartre describes the despera-
tions of some people-unable to
know themselves except as they
are mirrored in others-when oth-
ers refuse to reflect an image of
the person. Sumner pointed out
that hell has come to be portray-
ed, in this instance, as a style
of life.
Separation from God
The theme of the separation of
man from man has replaced that
of separation of man from God,
Sumner said in noting another
difference between older and
modern literature. The separation
is one in which there is a feeling
of no hope.
However, some traditional im-

ages of hell still influence the
new imagery, Sumner pointed out.
Yet these older images are main-
ly metaphorical and symbolic. The
conceptions of hell depicted by
men such as Calvin, Shakespeare
and Milton have under gone many
changes.
Commenting on the large
amount of modern literature being
devoted to the subject, Sumner
suggested that thinkers may be
disturbed by the breakdown of
any consistent explanation of the
presence of hell. Man's condition is
now conceived as his own respon-
sibility, a situation which is more
disturbing than being able to pro-
ject that condition upon a God.
In considering whether there is
any heaven, Sumner pointed to
William Golding's portrayal of
Ralph in "Lord of the Flies," who
stood for the continuance of the
community, and to J. D. Salinger's
"Franny and Zooey," in which
Zooey helps his sister by descend-
ing into her hell with her and
pulling her out of it.
UGLI Offers
Film Previews
The University's Audio-Visual
Education Center is currently pre-
viewing educational films in the
Undergraduate Library for the
benefit of teachers who desire to
use such films as classroom tools.
The previews are held daily in
the UGLI Multipurpose Rm. at
1:30 p.m.
Scheduled for today is "The
Hound that Thought He was a
Racoon." "Peter and the Wolf"
and "Lapland" will be shown at
the same time Friday.

DEATH CAMPS, SEPARATION
Sumner Discusses Origins
Of Modern 'Hell' Concept

One
studied
media.

of the influences to be
is the effect of the mass
Newspapers, radio and

ANNUAL CONFERENCE
Automation Hardest on Aged,
NEA Spokesman Maintains

An automation expert told the
Conference on Aging at the Uni-
versity Tuesday that "the disrup-
tive effect of automation has been
the greatest on the aged-those
least able to cope with change."
George E. Arnstein, associate
director of a National Education
Association project on automation,
spoke at the closing session of the
17th annual conference.
Citing increased productivity,
leisure time and knowledge result-
from automation, Arnstein said

that "Communications between
members of a multigeneration
familyare becoming strained be-
cause the aged are unable to un-
derstand many of the changes."
"The aged, who see their fami-
lies with frequency, have lower
morale and more symptoms of
depression than those who see
their families with lesser fre-
quency," Dr. Jack Weinberg, clini-
cal director of the Illinois State
Psychiatric Institute, said.

DIAL
8-6416

(,mmLil'L'l

STARTING
TODAY

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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WINNER OF 3 ACADEMY AWARDS

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
qtficial publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
3564 Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday.
THURSDAY, JULY 2
Day Calendar
High School Journalism Workshop--
Journalism Department, 10 a.m.

I

ARCADE BARBERS
6 Nickels Arcade

ent a TV this Summer
NEW 19" G.E. PORTABLES
only $10.00 per month
FREE DELIVERY & SERVICE
TV set on display at Follett's Bookstore
Ca/I NEJAC TV eenta
phone: NO 2-5671
"Mums -wI.

Department of Linguistics Forum Lec-
ture-Einar Haugen, "Diglossia in Mod-
ern Norway": Rackham Amphitheatre,
7:30 p.m.
Summer Concert Series Piano Recital
-Gyogry Sandor: Rackham Aud., 8:30
p.m.
Aduio-Visual Education Center Sum-
mer Session Film Previews: "Peter and
the Wolf," today: 1:30 p.m., Under-
grad Library Multipurpose Room.
General Notices
The International Center is sponsor-
ing a speaker on the topic, "The
American Democratic System of Gov-
ernment." Prof. Walter Burnham, Pro-
fessor of Government at Haverford
College, will speak at 7:30 p.m., July
3, in the, Recreation Room of the In-
ternational Center. Refreshments will
be served. All are welcome.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS, Bureau of
Appointments-Seniors & grad students.
please call Ext. 3544 for appointments
with the following:
THURS., JULY 2 (TODAY)-
Central Intelligence Agency, Washing-
ton, D.C.-Men & Women. John For-
rester will be interviewing all day at
the Bureau of Appts. Seeking degrees
in Econ. only. BA & MA level. Posi-
tions: Economists.
THUR S., JULY 8-
General Foods Corp., White Plains,
N.Y.-Seeking MEN, May & Aug. grads
(p.m. only). BA or MA or BBA. Psych.,
Ind. Rels. or anyone interested in
Personnel work. Positions: Personnel
Admin. Trainee Program.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Peace Corps-Will visit the U. of M.

July 6-11. They will have information
centers in the Lower Lobby of the
Mich. Union and on the Diagonal.
Make appointments with representa-
tives for placement test.
Youth Opportunity Centers-As a part
of the war against poverty, Youth Op-
portunity Centers will soon be estab.
At these centers, youth will be inter-
viewed. counseled, tested, placed in
jobs or referred. 2000 staff trainees
are geing recruited. Seeking young
grads with outstanding personal traits,
pref. with some bkgd. in soc., psych.,
soc. work, educ., counseling or related
fields. Candidates who qualify to be-
come Counselor Aides' will train for
8-10 weeks at one of 15 universities, be-
ginning July 15. More info. at Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

2000 W. Stadium Blvd.

I1

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (Department of Speech)
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS'
powerful drama
SUMMER and SMOK~rE
Next Week, Wed.-Sat., July 8-11
8:00 P.M., LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

t A ............... _ .. .._..
f
Y r
s
.

Box office open daily
after 12:30 p.m.
Closed Sat., July 4th
Coming Next-July 15-18
Sam Spewack's

$1.50, $1.00-
Wed. & Thurs.
$1.75, $1.25-
Fri. & Sat

The
t r joy-fiIled,
story of
Americas oven
Sget-up-and-go
v gaL..all the

Ci
!j

UNDER THE SYCAMORE TREE

ay . 4 - _ _

Please Note Schedule
SHOWS AT
2-5 and 8 O'CLOCK

r /cion ir.Modern (3ooiiizg

, .

Ending
TONIGHT

A towering triumph of ad-
venture and excitement!
The Winner of 27 Inter-
national Awards...
7 Academy Awards!

v way frm
ragamuffin
p, to
th
STARR :; t..>
RN8noAa~qPG~lL

FOLK DANCE
Thurs., July 2
8:00 50c
Basement of Hillel
EVERYONE WELCOME
TRIUMPH
Sales and Service
Herb Estes
AUTOMART

I

Ul

11

-

Z
e,'
i -,. ,
' !
0 .f '
s
f. (
,it
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Be Refreshed
this Summer!
Read The Daily
-Cool Editorials
-Calm Sports Coverage
-Crisp Coverage of news.
entertainment events

MUMAMMMWI AM GOLDEN
AIIC |UINNESS JACK HAWKINS
a FR1DAY@
OWH TO'AY

319 West Huron

665-3688

11'i

4 ;__
:-' : L;

GOLF DRIVING RANGE
MINIATURE GOLF
GOLF LESSONS

I U
U 1
I 1
W "
1 I
U 1
MAIL THIS FORM in Today or call NO 2-3241 1-3 P.M. U
I Delivered five mornings a week for the entire summer semester

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