100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 01, 1969 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PageTwo 'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 1, 1969

art

Program Informationj665-6240

I1-,_,

_ _ ---=

Looking for reality?

.. .lo and

behold!

DAVE JOHNS
GOES ELECTRIC
with
BASEMENT BAND

i.

By ROBERT LYTLE
The Michigan Museum of Art
presently has an exhibition of
contemporary piints on loan un-
til March 16 from the Winston
collection in Detroit. It is an
exciting, stimulating exhibition
with works by Andy Warhol,
R o b e r .t" Rauschenberg, Max
Ernst and some twenty other
artists.
In the course of the twen-
tieth century, artists have 7e-
lentlessly explored the pos-
sibilfties of painting. More than
the poets, novelists or drama-
tists, the modern artists 'iave
consistently challenged tradi-
tional ways of viewing the world
and have sought new forms to
express their vision and under-
standing. -Starting with Manet
and continuing through to Andy
Warhol and Barnett Newman,
they have violated every rule
and convention in their attempt
to define, not only the picto e
. plane,, but another reality en-
tirely. Today, there are no rules,
no conventions left and the ar-
tistls free to use whatever 'orms
necassa ry to express his vision.
The exhibit in the Alumni Me-
morial Hall is a startling ex-
ample of the depth and com-
plexity of that vision.
I say startling because I was
unprepared for what I even-
tually found: it is one think to
talk about new ways of seeing,
but to actually see in new ways
is'a different matter.
I had walked around the ex-
hibit, looking briefly at etch
work and trying to understand
what each one was about. I must
admit that my mind was not

on the prints before me---I was
thinking about the article I had
to write. I ended up with Bai -
nett Newman's work, The ,1o-
ment. It is a piece of plexiglass
about six inches wide and Three
feet tall. The center is light blue
and is bordered on either sidle
by a band of darker blue. I
liked it . . it was pretty.
unpretentious . . . I liked the
way it just seemed to go on arid
on . . . I realized that the length
was arbitrary, but . . . then I
looked at the title again: "The
Moment."
It was like realizing the sleep-
ing pill you took an hour ago
was not a sleeping pill at all--
but some heavy amphetamine:
my thoughts were speeding over
that "Moment." So I started all
over again, knowing I had miss-
ed it all the first time through.
I learned in History of Art
272 (a great course if Diane
Kirkpatrick is teaching it.
I don't know about anyone
else) that Robert Rauschenberg
is one of the most. important
and influential of the Pop ar-
tists, but I never really knew
why. "Accident" and the "Stunt
Man" prints provided the an-
swer. I had thought I under-
stood Allen D'Archangelo's un-
titled work the first time
around. But now, the more I
looked at it, the more confused
and bewildered I became. But
also delighted and entranced.
So it went with virtually all of
the prints. One or two remained
closed, but most of them open-
ed as I stepped back and lept
into them. They ceased to be
merely prints and became ideas,

perspectives----whole worlds
themselves.

in

I

It is important to understand
why I missed so much the first
time. Basically it's because I
felt I could understand the pic-
tures without taking the time
to get into them. "Yeah, um .
cubist, perhaps futurists in-
fluence . . . um, concerned with
interplay of color planes . ."
But that's not it at all. Modern
art . is deceptively simple; it
often takes time and patience
to understand and appreciate
what the artist has done. Be-
cause the artist is often con-
cerned, not with showing new
things but with new ways of
seeing old things, it also re-
quires an open, inquring mind.
So it's there in that little
room, in the Art Museum . . . all
those new ways of seeing, all
those questions . . at least until
the 16th of March. You
shouldn't miss it.

Alice's
Sat., March 1

Restaurant
9 P.M.

50c

FREE FOOD--

I

I

FREE FOD

LAST 2 DAYS

SAT. AND SUN.
3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00

LAS-2--Y

"BY FAR THE BEST!
A LOT GOING FOR

IT!"

-N.Y. TIMES

"IT'S A REALLY GOOD
RAM WIN! PCICURES preSnts AM C
l 1

SCENE!"
--N.Y. POST

o

G-For General Audiences
NEXTI
"CHARLY"
Academy Nominated
BEST PICTURE-BEST ACTOR
Cliff Robertson

Read

BOOKS'

-Daily-Eric Pergeaux
Stunt Man
Robert RauSchenberg
Feb. 28, March 1
THE SERVANT
DIRK BOGARDE
screenplay by Harold Pinter
3 ACADEMY AWARDS
." "-. '

Every
Sunday

sw

~ SV/Y KENDAl:DENNIS WAIERMAN -]ili "i fEDii
ANTHONY HAYELOCK-ALIAN and ONBRA8OURNE HARRY FINE PETER CRUI SON ;
TECHNISCIU TECHNICOLO V A PARAMOUNT PICTURE S
k MM MR- IE WIAKW N M I = -MEI ---.coi

in

Z, 4P

FIT AVE,

I

LIiiwutt

DOUBLE FEATURE-MON., TUES., WED.
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER ROD STEIGER
"NO WAY TO TREAT A LADY"
CATHERINE DENEUVE the "BELLE DE JOUR" girt
"BENJAMIN"

Batly

I

I

T

-Daily-Eric Pergeaux
Andy Warhol: Self Portrait
NATIONAL~G~~E~A~ -O~-- -A-

-Daily-Eric Pergeaux
The Moment
Barnett Newman

I

P OX EASTE}'N THEATR2ES
375 No.MAPLE R.7691300

HELD OVER
4th WEEK

NOMINATED FOR 2 ACADEMY AWARDS *

* BEST PICTURE * BEST DIRECTOR *

-_

"DAZZLING! once you see it, you'll never again picture
Romeo & Juliet' quite the way you did before!" - LIFE

Program Information r 668-6416
TODAY-2 SPECIALS
Winner of 6 Academy Awards
COLUMBIA PICTURES present
FRED ZINNEMANN'S
FILM (IF
A A"
FO ALL
lrmm the play by
iEA 1MONs
Today & Sun. at 1:00-5:00-9:00
PLUS -
Efma Efff l
Today & Sun. at 3:00 & 7:00
* NOT CLASSIFIED *
NEXT!
"RACHEL, RACHEL"
also "Heart Is the Lonely Hunter"

SEE
performing fully dressed
at
F~uITEd
TOndITE"fecundciry
and 8:00 P.M. FREE EATS ! musc r
SUNDAYmsc
ADMISSION $1.50 at the door ($1.00 af ter 2nd set)

ii

N

THE CHESS-MATE
COFFEE,-.HOUSE
ENTERTAI NMENT
after-hours dancing
FREE
THE CHESS-MATE COFFEE HOUSE
(no age limit)
DETROIT, MICHIGAN
Livernois at6 Mile
Expires March 21, 1969 Tel. 862-1554

CLIP THIS COUPON AND SAVE
GOOD FOR ONE FREE ADMISSION
WITH ONE PAID ADMISSION
Now appearing through March 2:
DAVE VAN RONK
folk-singing and blues
Open till 5 A.M.-Friday & Saturday

I

..~ .1.
,Yq ":
fi}.'Y{i:v'{}%
18
I- "r
::}hd

ry. . - .
W. ma
"} ?rt }:h ';f :$ {s:$ r; ..," . r { x .,"'".. %
:ty-4h°}<;} ,'; y:,:f~":$,Ff;.. Ml, '
::y:}$ 7} . v ".}:....x"'f '%yv f: v{.v :
f ?: {s" .f 3 ? :5ffrr~2}:Y. x. .if:{ . "
't'^}%S : .*a:t ''i:: "* t'h . - Y:;u- ?'h -tp
:;:.: }}} : : :" }$ r.:; ". } 4 o_{___j{ jS y,:-- Y ' -
Waf
::
000
wmam

t

IL

--

.

p

I

.L

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan