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March 01, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

7h reA

Saturday; March 1, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page I

Iaudy Mrh1 16IH ICIA IYPg ~ ~r'

a?

TONIGHT
BOB

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

'M4

WHITE
guitar, banjo, autoharp
Sat- 1:00 p.M.
Workshop 25c
Sat. eve late
"After Hours"
"Something comes thru Bob White's songs that you don't
find much these days, a deep felt optimism. Singing songs
that capture the deepest feeling of people . . . He captures
and keeps his audience."-Michigan Daily
V - ,
Follow the
Psychedelic
Pied Piper
to a
"STON ED
ANIMATION TRIP
lasting nearly three hours
An International Collection of
AWARD WINNING
experimental animated cinema
including examples of BRITISH, CZECHOSLOVAK-
IAN (spoof on American films), CANADIAN (Nor-
man McLaren's "Mosaic" and "Blinkity Blank"),
INDIAN and AMERICAN Cinematic Art (Scott
Bartlett's spectacular "off-on")
PLUS Mickey Mouse in Viet Nam, Betty Boop, Koko,
Bimbo, Mr. Magoo, and Gene Autry, The Sounds of
the Beatles, Cab Calloway, Ella Fitzgerald,
the Oscar Peterson Trio.
February 27, 28, March 1, 2
11:00 P.M.-Thursday-Sunday
at THE FIFTH FORUM
210 So. Fifth at Liberty

Search
By The Associated Press
In the t h r e e months since
Black Panther leader Eldridge
Cleaver fled arrest in California
authorities report no trace of
him despite numerous leads and
a search that has reached into
other countries.
Officially, the FBI will s a y
!only that the case is under in-
vestigation.
But it is known that authori-
ties are uncertain whether the
33-year-old self-educated Negro
author, considered extremely
dangerous by the FBI, carried
out an implied threat to leave
the country.
Just before dropping from
sight Nov. 24, Cleaver said his
only alternative to serving a jail
sentence for violating parole
was to "get out of the country."
That statement, somesfeel,
could have been a smoke screen
to draw investigators off Cleav-
er's path.
It is pointed out also t h a t

Cleaver's connections through
the militant Black Panthers and
his 1968 presidential campaign
- he polled 36,385 votes -- give
him numerous allies in his ef-
fort to evade apprehension.
Moreover, the financial suc-
cess of his book, "Soul on Ice,"
could provide him with the mon-
ey that a life in hiding requires.
Added to these factors is
Cleaver's natural intelligence,
attested to by the fact that he
rose during his years in prison
from being a semi-illiterate to
become a writer with critically
acclaimed skill.
Cleaver disappeared two days
before Supreme Court Justice
Thurgood Marshall denied a re-
quest for a stay that would have
barred California officials from
taking him into custody.'
His wife, Kathleen, said Nov.
26 that the Black Panthers
would keep her husband from
going back to prison "by any
-" means necessary."
When some other top Black
Panthers, including cofounder
Bobby Seale, showed up in Mon-
treal early in December for an
anti-Vietnam war conference,
speculation was that Cleaver.
too, made the trip.
So California authorities ap-
pealed to the FBI for assistance,
and the federal agency entered

the case, charging the Negro
leader with interstate flight to
avoid confinement.
A wanted flyer, widely dis-
seminated by the FBI, was la-
beled: "CautionhCleaver alleg-
edly has engaged police officers
in gun battle in the past. Con-
sider armed and extremely dan-
gerous."
The apparent reference was to
the Panthers' gun battle with
Oakland, Calif., police last Ap-
ril - the incident which trig-
gered revocation of Cleaver's pa-
role.
Cleaver was wounded during
ff1111

the fray, rearrested and ordered
to finish the 14-year prison sen-
tence he began in 1958 u p o n
conviction for assault with in-
tent to kill. He was freed on pa-
role in 1967.
During the time after his re-
lease, he served as minister of
information for the Panthers,
wrote for Ramparts magazine
and lectured occasionally to col-
lege audiences.
"Soul on Ice," a series of es-
says based on Cleaver's person-
al experiences, was written while
he was in prison. It was pub-.
lished last year.
,akes on

academic life

FBI BAFFLED
for Cleaver continues

K--
K:

STEAK and EGGS
with hashbtown potatoes,
toast and jelly
$1.10
STEVE'S LUNCH
just west of SAB
NOW OPEN SUNDAYS, TOO

ST. PAUL, Minn. ()-Prof.
Hubert H. Humphrey sits in his
brand new office with its view
of the snowy Macalester College
campus andrsometimes ponders
that but for a half a million
votes his office would have a
view of the Washington Monu-
ment.
"I must say," Humphrey ac-

--

-

news today
by The Associalcd Press and College Press SerIice

I

3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING

Alice's Restaurant
DAVE JOHNS,
Blues Singer
9:00
FREE FOOD
50c

ii

Feature
Wed., Sat., Sun
1:30-3:45-6:15-8:30
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.
6:30-9:00
JOIN-IN THE DISNEY
FUN-IN!

605 E. William
769-1593
COMMANDER CODY
AND HIS LOST PLANET AIRMEN

knowledges, "there are times
when I think about what we
should have done ' in different
states. But I don't dwell on it
too longebecause it just ruins
you. Really, it can make you
terribly morose and very upset."
Although there may be mo-
ments of sadness over what
might have been, Humphrey ap-
pears neither morose nor upset.
Humphrey's last academic
job before he was taken over
by politics was at Macalester.
In 1944 he conducted the
longest class session in the
school's history, on the strengths
and dangers of fascism in
America.
On the second morning of his
return to the campus, Hum-
phrey faced another long meet-
ing, a question and answer ses-
sion with some of the more
militant of Macalester's stu-
dents. A similar affair-a "give
Humphrey hell" session, accord-
ing to one school official-was
scheduled afterlunch,
During the morning grilling
he had been hit with many of
the same issues he had heard
from the young during the cam-
paign: His praise of Mayor
Richard J. Daley's handling of
the Chicago convention rioting;
his linking arms with Georgia
Gov. Lester Maddox; the fail-
ure, as some of them saw it, of
the poverty program...
Over cream of tomato soup
Humphrey said, "All you have
to do is agree with them, and
then you're fine, but I didn't
come to a campus to be a yes
man to any demand that is
made or any observation that is
made."
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesdaythrough
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

ANTI-MERGER ANNOUNCEMENTS by the Justice
Department yesterday sent stock prices of major con-
glomerates nose-diving.
Following an announcement by Richard McLaren, an as-
sistant attorney general that the anti-trust division expects
to take action under the Celer-Kefauver Act, prices of such
large conglomerates as Litton Industries and Ling-Temco-
Vought fell by as much as 50 per cent.
McLaren said he believes the act can be used to bar mer-
gers between unrelated corporations even though the John-
son administration claimed the bill would have to be amended
before the conglomerates could be affected.
The Celer-Kefauver act is designed to prevent mergers
"which may tend to lessen competition . . . in any line of
commerce in any section of the country."
THE SOVIET UNION yesterday suggested that East
Germany take measures to halt West German military
activities in Berlin.
The announcement made by Tass and the East German
news agency ADN followed West Berlin Mayor Klaus Sch-
uetz's approval of the West German Presidential elections in
the city scheduled for next Wednesday.
The Soviet Union, which had earlier vowed that the elec-
tions would not proceed in the city, charged that Berlin not
only manufactured weapons but also supplied young men for
the West German military.
Observers see the charges only as further harassment of
the elections which have never produced a direct confronta
tion in the past.
SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR Walter J. Hickel
yesterday called for' new legislation to protect offshore
waters from oil pollution.
Testifying before a Senate public works subcommittee,
Hickle urged that oil companies responsible for offshore pol-
lution be held liable for the clean-up costs.
Hickel also said he felt the government has not adequate-
ly regulated large oil companies through the granting of off-
shore drilling permits.
Meanwhile another oil leak in the Santa Barbara Chan-
nel widened yesterday, releasing oil at the rate of nearly 4,000
gallons per day. The leak was partly the result of the first
offshore oil blow-out four weeks ago which squirted oil at the
rate of 21,000 gallons per day onto California beaches.
FINAL PROSECUTION ARGUMENTS in the con-
spiracy trial of Clay Shaw were presented yesterday.
Presenting final state rebuttal to the jury after the de-
fense had lost its second motion for a court ordered verdict
of innocent, the prosecution claimed it had proved beyond a
doubt that there were three gunmen who killed the former
President.
As conclusive evidence, the prosecution used a home
movie of the motorcade in which the President rode, the
testimony of a housewife who watched the motorcade, and
the nature of the President's wounds.
AMERICAN AIRLINES strike negotiationswere sus-
pended yesterday until next Monday afternoon.
The break in the talks, which was called for the two sides
to "spend their weekend apart to re-examine their positions,"
virtually ruled out the possibility of a weekend settlement.
The National Mediation Board scheduled the break in the
talks following ten days of intensive negotiation. The strike,
however, came a f t e r a 30 day cooling off period and ten
months of talks. Union contracts with the airline expired
last May.
1 I
Thompson's PIZZA
THIS COUPON IS GOOD FOR
-off 50c off-
ON A LARGE ONE ITEM
(OR MORE) PIZZA
f U
Coupon expires Saturday, March 1st
ONE COUPON PER PIZZA
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~........ mm mm mm mm mm w '

Friday, Feb. 28
Sat., Mar. 1

11-2
9-12

p.m.
p.m.

$1.00 downstairs

I

Daily Classifieds Get Results

rWA~LDISNEY
Winnie th~oh
andthe busterydcq
Technicolor

Q Re37RiCTtQ-r...«r.uMauek.an m«.
um.as.eosn+p.MN yMr.ntsr.lut!{wrM.n.

I

CoiI.

O in

:
t
W

Saturday and Sunday
THE LOVERS
(LES AMANTS)
Directed by Louis Malle, 1959
JEANNE MOREAU
"The film's unrestrained ro-
mantic plunge into the Real-
ity of Sex is purely youthful."
-Stanley Kauffman
Short: THE CAGE
(Son Quentin prisoners)

AMECAN INTENA1TONAL sT.S
Y+ETTE AAIMEUEX
INETHE
33 oPACE-MAGGiETRETT- jNA A 2

UNI
UNION-LEAGUE

President and
Mrs. Fleming

Invite you to an

SHOWS AT
1,3,5,7
& 9:05 P.M.
Feature
25 Min. Later

75c

7:00 & 9:05
662-8871

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

I

OPEN HOUSE
Tuesday, March 4, 1969
4-6 o'clock
815 South University Ave.
Opportunity to chat informally with
faculty and administrators

j ij

FREE ADMISSION!

A

on

r N-
lu

I

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

AA TRUST
TENANTS:

MIGRANT

PROABLEM'S

AA Trust is notifying some ten-
ants' parents of the Rent Strike.
Contact the T.U. o f f i c e in this
event.

-r .. ;M M 1

111; 11

- ii f'AriinrAV I A A E~iJ I 1

i

,

11

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