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July 16, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

state Militia Arrest
vegroI ntegrationists
n Drugstore Picket

VERNOR-Gov. George C. .Wallace of Alabama, left, is the
ond Southern governor to attack Kennedy's rights' program.
Bargain Days at
RAMSAY PRINTERS
Selected Stationery /2 Off
Plain and decorated items
RAMSAY PRINTERS
119 E. Liberty NO 8-7900

Police Jail
Negr oes Led
By Clergy
Registrar Convicted
Of Civil Contempt
CAMBRIDGE, Md. (A)-National
guardsmen with fixed bayonets
and gas masks yesterday arrested
14 Negroes, including militant in-
tegrationist Mrs. Gloria Richard-
son, attempting to picket a segre-
gated drugstore.
Tension among Negro integra-
tionists mounted when the man-
agement of Gwynn Oak amuse-
ment park in Baltimore rejected a
proposal to begin admitting Ne-
groes on July 26.
In New York, a large group of
clergy-led Negro demonstrators at
a Brooklyn construction site were
taken into custody by police.
They claimed discrimination
in job hiring.
In Washington, Alabama Gov.
George C. Wallace said that Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy has been
"pressured" into approving mob
violence and street rioting in be-
half of his civil rights program.
Wallace told the Senate Com-
merce Committee that the Ken-
nedy Administration's handling of
racial problems brought the na-
tion to "the brink of civil war-
fare."
In New Orleans, a Mississippi
voter registrar, accused of trying
to fail Negro applicants, was con-
victed of civil contempt of federal
court.
The 5th United States court of
appeals gave. Theron C. Lynd, of
Hattiesburg, 10 days to comply
with a list of court requirements
to purge himself of contempt.
In another voting case, United
States Dist. Judge Harold Cox in
Jackson, Miss., set a show cause
hearing for Saturday in the Jus-
tice Department suit against H. T.
Ashford Jr., Hinds County Circuit
Clerk.

Suggests
Bias Bill
Wor ding
By linking civil rights measures
to the language of long establish-
ed statutes regarding business
practices, members of the Senate
Commerce Committee believe that
they might be able to get around
many of the legal and political
objections to civil rights legisla-
tion.
This would follow Congress's
power over commerce to end ra-
cial discrimination in commercial
establishments.
FTC Act
One statute that the committee
is considering. isthe Federal Trade
Commission Act of 1914, a New
York Times article recently report-
ed.
Section Five of that act states
in part:. 6
"Unfair methods of competition
in commerce, and unfair or decep-
tive acts or practices in commerce,
are hereby declared unlawful."
The concept under present con-
sideration would start in that same
'manner and then go on to speci-
fy that the refusal of an estab-
lishment involved in interstate
commerce to deal with a person
on account of race is an "unfair
practice."
The courts have for a long time
held that a concerted refusal to
deal with someone on account of
race is an "unfair practice."
Tying the public accommoda-
tions bill to existing statutory lan-
guage would answer senatorial ob-
jection of a new and far-reaching
use of the Constitution's commerce
clause.
It is felt that it would be diffi-
cult to denounce a method first
used in 1914 as novel or new.
Resentment Would Remain
Southern resentment to the bill
would still undoubtedly remain but
there would be less confusion as
to the bill's legality.
The Commerce Committee will
go into its third week of discus-
sion on the administration civil
rights bill. Among the witnesses
will be more Southern governors.
The House Judiciary Committee
will continue to hold its parallel
hearings on all sections of the bill
while the Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee will begin its work on all
but the public accommodations
section of the bill.

French trade barriers against
some American fruits and canned
vegetables "could get us into a
trade war," a high administration
official said recently.
The curbs are costing American
exporters an estimated $28 million
a year, according to an article in
the Washington Post.
Ruled Unjustified
The trade barriers have par-
ticularly incensed the administra-
tion since an international trade
body ruled that they were unjusti-
fied.
Former Secretary of State Chris-
tian A. Herter,President John F.
Kennedy's special trade negotiator,
will discuss the matter next week
in Paris. Herter leaves next week

for a tour of at least five Euro-
pean capitals.
The barriers in question are
quotas, licensing requirements and
other limitations on American ap-
ples, pears, canned vegetables and
dried fruits.
Economic Aid
The restrictions had been im-
posed in the late 1940's and early
1950's, with the United States'
consent, to relieve France's dollar
shortage. However, the agreement
provided that when France had
surmounted the deficit in her bal-
ance of payments, the curbs would
end.
In 1958, the General Agreement
on Tariffs and Trade, the inter-
national body that sets trade regu-
lations, held that 'the curbs were
no longer justified.
When negotiations failed to re-
move them, the United States fil-
ed a formal complaint with the
GATT. Last November, GATT rul-
ed in favor of the- United States
and urged both countries to settle
the matter amicably.
Recent negotiations have prov-
ed unsuccessful, and the adminis-

tration spokesman thought that
Herter would fare no better.
If Herter does fail in bringing
about an accord, it would leave
the United States free to take
some type of retalitory action such
as raising the import tariffs on
French wines. This type of action
could get us into a trade war, the
official said.
Kuhn's Group
Reaches Goal
Berkley Mayor George Kuhn's
petition group has obtained 231,-
000 signatures on petitions to out-
law city income taxes on non-
residents.
The petition also calls for a
popular vote on any city income
tax on residents. Kuhn a leader
of a group of suburban Detroit
mayors said that efforts to gather
more names will continue "just in
case."
The group has opposed Detroit's
one per cent tax on income earned
within the city by non-residents.

TRADE BARRIERS:
French Curbs Irk Exporters

Chinese Exodus
To Soviet Union
Stirs Friction
Between 50,000 and 70,000 per-
sons fled from Communist China
into the Soviet Union last year,
according to reports that Ameri-
can officials have recently veri-
fied.
At the same time, thousands of
refugees were trying to get out of
the country through the British
Crown Colony of Hong Kong.
Refugees crossed the border of
China's Sinkiang Province into the
Soviet Union's Kazakh Republic.
During the flights, groups of Chi-
nese gathered in front of the So-
viet Consulate and Kuldja, de-
manding arms to fight the Pe-
king regime, According to reliable
sources, these demands were re-
fused.
As a result of the friction arous-
ed between the two Communist
regimes, the Chinese government
last September closed the Kuldfa
and the four other Soviet consul-
ates in China.
The basic reason for the flight
seems to be the same one that
caused mass attempts at flight
into Hong Kong-fear of mass
starvation. Those who crossed into
the Soviet Union, however, were
Kazakhs and Uighurs, nomadic
people who have for centuries
fought with the central govern-
ment in Peking.

BARGAIN DAY VALUES!
at
MAST'S Campus Shoes,
MEN'S SHOES

I

$6.00

$8900
Values to 19.95

$10.00

20% OFF
on ALL
MERCHANDISE

1 Group Men's Assorted

Styles

... $5.00

INDIA ART SHOP
330 Moynard
(across from Arcade)

Women's fashion, Shoe's

i

World News Roundup

$6.00

$8.00

-6

THE NEWS IS OUT...
With an Ann Arbor Bank Special-
check Account, checks cost just
1Cc each at the time they're used
-there's no minimum balance re-
quired either! Why don't you do as
thousands of other University peo-
ple do . pay your bills with Ann
Arbor Bank Speciaichecks?

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President Jul-
ius K. Nyerere of Tanganyika ar-
rived yesterday for two days of
talks with President John F. Ken-
nedy and other top United States
officials and received a ceremon-
ial welcome at the White Ifouse.
WASHINGTTN-Proposed legis-
lation to cut down the mailing of
obscene matter might involve the
Post Office in thousands of public
hearings every year, a postal offi-
cial told Congress last week. Mem-
bers of a House Post Office sub-
committee indicated that they
might amend the bills to meet
some of the objections raised by
Louis J. Doyle, chief counsel for
the department.

rice and palm oil and free medical
care-after the union had won an
agreement to increase wages to
eight cents an hour.
WASHINGTON-The Air Force
announced it will start training
German Air Force pilots in ad-
vanced operation of Fi04C jet
fighters at Luke Air Force Base,
Ariz., next year. The Air Force
said it expects to train 83 pilots
during the first year of a program
starting in October 1964.
* . *
NEW YORK-The stock market
had its third straight "gloomy
Monday" as prices suffered their
sharpest slide in a week.: Dow
Jones 30 industrials down 4.42; 20
railroads down 1.01; 15 utilities
down .94; and 65 combined stocks
down 1.59.

.FLATS $4.-00&y$5,00
Washable Plays Shoes3
CAMPUS MAST'S SHOP
619 East Liberty NO 2-0266

/

-(
y

IJ

E

\A

li

DISCOUNT RECORDS, INC.
BARGAIN DAYS SALE
TEN LABELS
List 3.98-2.39 OFF
List 4.98-2.99
List 5.98-3.59
RCA VICTOR LONDON ARCHIVE
CAPITOL ATLANTIC VERVE
ELEKTRA
ANGEL VANGUARD
PRESTIGE
INCLUDES
FOLK MUSIC, JAZZ, POPULAR, CLASSICAL, BROADWAY SHOWS,
SOUNDTRACKS, FOREIGN, BAROQUE, BOSSA NOVA, SPOKEN WORD
MONO and STEREO Records by the following Artists:
Joan Baez, Oscar Peterson, Theodore Bikel, MJQ, Peggy Lee, Leontyne
Price, John Coltrane, Harry Belafonte, Oscar Brand, Charles Munch, Sir
Thomas Beecham, Van Cliburn, Stan Getz, Maria Callas, Mantovani,
Herbie Mann. Al Martino. University of Michigan Band. Met Torme, Otto

I

group of
Lanz Originals
main
floor

dresses

skirts
blouses
slacks
shorts
beach
cover-ups
jackets

I

0

1

U- U4 II

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