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July 16, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a____THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sees Only
$10 Million
Budget Rise
(Continued from Page 1)
million in revenue, based on the
current tax stiucture.
He notes that a revenue pro-
jection is difficult, but the range
covers the possibility of no sig-
nificant increase to above average
growth.
"Obviously, predictions made so
far in advance are subject to
change by business conditions, the
national economy and internation-
al emergencies," Allen cautions.
The state deficit which stood at
$85.6 million a year ago, now
stands at $30 million, but would
only be cut to $16.2 million in the
projected budget.
Debt Increase
If the state takes on any new
programs or changes policies, this
figure would increase, Allen notes.
While citing 11 programs rang-
ing from hospital aid to civil de-
fense for increases, Allen only
mentions three ways of reduction.
One would be through the recom-
mendation of Romney's account-
ant task force that has studied
state operations. But, he warned,
the savings are comparatively
small.
The state could cut school aid
to loal communities and give
them more taxing powers, or it
could cut major state programs
such as mental health and edu-
cation, Allen said.
No Debt
Bursley disagreed with Allen's
prediction of a deficit, predicting
that it would be wiped out as
business continues at its current
high rate.
Calling Allen's projections'"real-
istic" rather than "optimistic,"
Bursley said that it would not
hinder the drive for fiscal reform.
"The budget is optimistic as it
shows the state operating well in
the black, but is realistic as it
shows the continued deficit in
1965.
No Crisis
"There is not a cash crisis. The
state is solvent, but it should pre-
pare for new revenue now," Bur-
sley declared.
Romney is continuing his meet-
tings with legislative leaders and
the taxation committees of the
Legislature arealso holding brief-
ing sessions with state officials in
preparation for the fall special
session.
Across
Campus
Prof. Emeritus George Buttrick
of Harvard University will discuss
Archibald MacLeich's play, "J.B."
at noon today in the Anderson
Room of the Union, and at 4:10
p.m. he will speak on "A Revolu-
tion in Morality" in Aud. A.
Pearls
TherBaroque Trio will give a
concert at 8:30 pm. today in
Trueblood Auditorium.
Southern Talk ...
Friends of SNCC will present a
talk by two Daily reporters on
their experiences on a recent trip
to Albany, Ga., at 8 p.m. today
in Rm. 3 of the Michigan Union.
Anchors Aweigh . .
The Naval Officers procurement
team will be at Angell Hall from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. from July 16-18
to speak to anyone interested in
attending Officers Candidate
School.

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FEDERAL SPONSORSHIP:
Research Raises Controversy

il

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(Continued from Page 1)

funds for libraries, fine arts fa-
cilities and other things not widely
supported.
The University is concerned
about this problem. Vice-President
for Research Ralph A. Sawyer has
pointed out that the University
uses the Rackham and similar en-
dowment funds to support re-
search not well supported" by fed-
eral and private sources.
Further, the University adheres
to the "elevator" principle, Vice-
President for Academic Affairs
Roger W. Heyns says. It strives to
increase the quality of both its
scientific and humanistic endea-
vors.
The University Senate commit-
tee on research also studies this
problem.
Lure Professors
The Carnegie report also warn-
ed that well-known professors are
being lured from the classroom to
the laboratory, leaving teaching to
younger and less experienced in-
structors.'
Generally speaking, the Tribune
survey shows, the federal govern-
ment does not spend research
money to improve education. Its
aim is to investigate theories, de-
velop processes, perfect techniques
and train personnel necessary in
this increasingly scientific society.
There is no set pattern for
awarding research grants and
contracts to-colleges and univer-
sities. Because of the specialized

nature of some research, there is
little bidding for government-jobs.
Research funds are awarded to
institutions on a contract or grant
basis. Most defense department
and related space and atomic
agency work is determined by
contract. Most life and social
science research of NIH and NSF
is performed under grants.
Both require proposals from the
researcher which are scrutinized
by the government. In NIH and
NSF they are reviewed also by
experts in the proposer's field.
Grants and contracts are both
awarded for definite periods and
usually are renewable. Their es-
sential difference lies in the
amount of accounting and tech-
nical limitations placed on con-
ditions surrounding the research
and on the rate of indirect costs
that the government will subsi-
dize.
On the Man
Federal funds may also be
awarded on the basis of the man
doing the research, not the in-
stitution. The defense department,
for example, may first seek the'
top expert in the field of certain
satellite instrumentation and ask
him to do the research project.
If he is tied-up in other work, the
department may then seek the
next well-known man in the field.
The Tribune survey tells of a
professor awarded a federal grant
to develop an engineering process
at a mid-western universitl. The
institution forced him out as it
considered that he was spending
too much time on the project. It

later learned that the grant went
with the professor to his new uni-
versity.
Another recent issue concerns
secrecy. Prof. Lucien C. Biber-
mann of the University of Chi-
cago quit that institution after
declaring that it was not encour-
aging his defense department re-
search in general. He charged that
the university was discouraging.
secret projects undertaken on the
campus.
Education History
The federal government has
been involved in education for
some time. In 1787, the North-
west Ordinance set aside 1/16 of
each township for educational pur-
poses. The sale of this land gave
many school districts a helpful
start.
In 1802, it established the mili-
tary academy at West Point, its
first direct venture in higher edu-
cation. Today, the United States
runs five academies-army, navy,
air force, coast guard and mer-
chant marine-at a cost of $92
million.
Total spending for educating
government personnel-including
ROTC and eight graduate schools
in various scientific fields- is
estimated at $167 million a year.
The government paid out $231
million to 4100 "impacted" school
districts crowded with the children
of federal personnel.
It also helps support 68 land-
grant colleges, under the Morrill
Act at a cost of $100 million. The
land income averages $2.2 to $2.6
million a year.

DR. GEORGE A. BUTTRICK
Professor Em erituis,
Harvrd University
The Revolution in Morality
4:10 p.m.-TODAY
Angell Hall-Auditorium A
sponsored by the Office of Religious Affairs
The Public Is Welcome

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