100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 05, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5,1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. OCTOBER 5.1967

I

;"

VOICES OF CIVILIZATION:
Tiselus Explains Importance
Of Nobel Foundation Awards

Nobel Prize Winning Biologist
Lectures on DNA, RNA, Genes,

Acheson: U.S. Policy
Confuses Asia, West

4

By ALISON SYMROSKI
For, over half a century the
Nobel Foundation has been at-
tempting to "express human ap-
preciation" for the great dis-
coveries made each year, Swedish
biochemist Arne Tiselius said yes-
terday.
Speaking in Rackham amphi-
theater as part of the "Voices of
Civilization" program, Tiselius
drew from more than 20 years of
experience with the Nobel Fbun-
dation, in his explanation of its
problems and goals. He is a
former president of the founda-
tion and is currently chairman of
its committee for chemistry.
Tiselius, a 1948 prizewinner for
his work in electrophoresis and
chromatography, out-lined some
of toe difficulties in choosing the
winners. He explained that al-
though nominations are generally
made on the basis of merit
rather than nationality - each
year "many names may be over-
looked."
Major Difficulty
A major difficulty in choosing
Nobel Prize winners arises in
evaluating individual research
within a context of team re-
search. Tiselius said that a split
prize is no less an honor than
being a sole recipient. However,
he warned against giving compro-
mise prizes to researchers whose
work bears no relation to one
another's. He said that this would
lead to "inflation" in Nobel
Prize winners.

Tiselius said that the factor
governing choice in over-lapping
work is "who was the real pion-
eer," even though the later re-
searcher may have carried the
project further.
Tiselius suggested that the im-
portance of choosing prize win-
ners is greater today than in the
past. He explained this by noting
that the general public is taking
an increased interest in the Nobel
Prize as well as in scientific re-
search in general.
Brief History
In a brief history of the Nobel
Foundation, -Tiselius emphasized
that although the king of Sweden
chartered in 1900, the committees
which choose the winners are in
no way connected with the gov-
ernment. The foundation is pri-
marily run by academic institu-
tions, he said.
He described Alfred Nobel as
"a dreamer who experienced per-
iods of depression and frequently
felt his life was of no use." Nobel
saw the foundation as a way of
financing the research of brilliant
but poverty-ridden scientists, he
noted.
As this object is no longer
pertinent today, Tiselius raised
some questions about the present
place of the Nobel Foundation:
Are such individual awards justi-
fied in the concept of the "scien-
tific community?"; to what extent
is scientific discovery a result of
personal achievement, rather than
something that is bound to be

discovered by someone eventually
anyway?; and, should not scien-
tists be indifferent to such
worldly honors after all?
Tiselius expressed the opiniont
that "most serious workers have1
found their work a satisfaction
in itself." However, he added that
one function of the Nobel Prize
is encouragement for those who,
follow in the winner's footsteps.
He said that it was an im-
portant way of showing apprecia-'
tion for long-range research
whose importance may not other-
wise be given its deserved rec-
ognition.
Duobzhansky
Discusses
Research
By STUART GAINES
Prof. Theodosius Dobzhansky oft
the department of genetics at
Rockefeller University, discussed
Tuesday the morality of continu-
ing scienitific research in areas
where the conclusion may be so-
cially damaging to an ethnic
group. Dobzhansky -spoke to a
roundtable of students and fac-
ulty as a part of the "Voices of
Civilization" program.
Dobzhansky also discussed the
right of a scientist to continue
research possibly leading to the
production of a destructive de-
vice.
According to Dobzhansky, the,
role of a scientist in society is to
conduct objective research, and
supplying relevant information to
government cif f i c i a 1 s obtained
from his experiments.
Dobzhansky said it was impor-
tant to make a distinction be-
tween scientific and technological
research when questioning the
morality of scientific projects. He
felt that abstract scientific re-
search should be pursued, but he
was not sure whether or not so-
ciety could cope with some of the
results of technological progress.
Speaking on evolution, the field:
in which he is considered the
world's foremost expe.rt, Dobzhan-
sky said he considered the
chances of humanoid life evolving
on other planets "to be zero." He
admitted that this view is un-
popular with the majority of
scientists at the present.
Previous to his teaching at
Rockefeller University, the Rus-
sian-born United States citizen
held positions at the University
of Leningrad and the California
Institute of Technology.
His most publicized researchE
concerns the study of Drosephilia,
commonly known as the "fruit
fly."
James V. Neel, chairman of the
University's genetic department,
also participated in the discus-
sions.

By ERIC JACKSON
Nobel Prize winning biologist
Severo Ochoa said in a lecture
to an overflow audience at Rack-
ham yesterday that there may be
a fourth protein used in the repli-
cation of ribonucleic acid in cer-
tain infectious viruses.
Ochoa spoke on "Genetic Ex-
pression in the RNA of Bacterial
Viruses" as part of the "Voices
of Civilization" Sequicentennial
conference.
Ochoa discussed his research
into the nature, multiplication
and order of genes and radiation-
caused mutations of bacterial
viruses.
Ochoa, chairman of the de-
partment of biochemistry at the
New York University School of
Medicine, discussed his radiation
experiments with viruses which
resulted in three classes of mu-
tants. In the first class of mu-
tants the virus lost its outer coat
and its ability to reproduce. The
second mutation of the virus pro-
duced sterile progeny. These two
cases stopped further infection.
The third mutation halted repli-
cation of RNA and reproduction
of the virus at temperatures
above 43 degrees Centigrade.
Uses Slides
Ochoa, made extensive use of
the slide projector to, display the
main points in his lecture. They
included photographs from the
electron microscope and graphs
illustrating experimental data.

His electromicrographs showed
small sections of the virus studied
at increasingly higher magnific-
ations until the screen showed
only a fraction of the virus, a
rod-shaped object approximately
200 Angstroms, or one-millionth
of an inch, long.
Ochoa showed the order of
genes on the chromosome, com-
prised of three main sections. The
chromosome contains the coded
instructions to the cell for the
production of essential cell com-
ponents.
In the first position on the
chromosome was the information
for the cell's outer coat. The
second position contained the

"A" protein. The third carried
RNA replicase, a complex mole-
cule containing instructions for
the synthesis of more than one
thousand other cellular com-
ponents.
Ochoa has received interna-
tional recognition for his research
in breaking the geneticcode. He
was the first person to synthesize
RNA outside of a living organism
As a result of these experiments,
Ochoa is given the credit for
helping to unify chemistry and
genetics.
In' 1959 Ochoa won the Nobel
prize in medicine for his. dis-
coveries related to the biological
synthesis of RNA and DNA.

Bolivian Army's Manhunt
Tightens on 'Che' Guevara

By CAROLYN MIEGEL
"The great difficulty of the fed-
eral government, the White House,
and the State Department is that
they all fail to deal with several
problems at one time," Dean Ache-
son, secretary of state during the
Truman administration, said yes-
terday.
Speaking at the "Voices of Civil-
ization" symposium on "Europe
and Asia in American Foreign Pol-
icy" at Hill Aud. Acheson con-
tinued, "Maybe we overdid this
concentration in European policies
following World War II. Perhaps
we are now overcompensating for
the earlier neglect of the Far
East."
Edwin 0. Reischauer, former
ambassador to Japan and profes-
sor of history at Harvard, said
that authors of American foreign
policy "confuse problems in Asia
by trying to make analogies to the
European scene."
Both Acheson and Reischauer
agree that problems in foreign
policy are based in the ignorance}
on the part of the American peo-
ple and government.
Citing the State Department's
estimation of Japanese power in
1941 as an example of this ignor-
ance, Acheson said that American
leaders assumed that the Japanese
military clique would "operate on
the same reasonabletbasis asthe
military in the Western world. It
was a massive miscalculation of
the Japanese mind.,"
Reischauer cited recurrent prob-
lems in American policy: In the
Cold War days, we did not dif-
ferentiate political realities in
Europe from realities in Asia. The
creation of the South East Asian
Treaty Organization was a mis-

take because the conditions which
created its counterpart in Europe
-NATO-did not exist in Asia.
There were no strong national en-
tities, no examples of industrial-
ized societies, and none of the
close ties of the type that existed
between the United States and
Western Europe.
Today, in a reverse of the Cold
War policies, the problems of Viet-
nam have obscured the problems
of Europe, Reischauer continued.
"The low level of enlightenment
of the Congress is a reflection on
the nation. It is our blame, not
the Congress' "that deadlocks oc-
cur and that worthwhile programs
cannot be instituted, Reschauer
added. "A national educational
program is needed to avoid mak-
ing the mistakes of the past."
I '

OAP Sponsors Students,
Helps Adjustment'to U'

Editor's Note: The following
dispatch was subjected to Boli-
vian censorship.
CAMIRI, Bolivia (AP) - Two
guerrillas captured in the south-
eastern jungles of Bolivia were
flown to Camiri for questioning-
yesterday in a tightening army
manhunt for Latin America's re-
puted super - guerilla, Ernesto
"Che" Guevara.
Bolivian military authorities
believe they have trapped the
Argentine-born Guevara, once a
top lieutenant of Cuban Prime
Minister Fidel Castro, in jungle
areas not far from Camiri.
The two captured guerrillas,
both Bolivians, were identified as
Antonio Rodriguez Flores and Or-
lando Jiminez Bazan. Rodriguez
Flores was said to have deserted
from the guerrillas. One military
source said they may be used as
witnesses in the current trial of
French radical Regis Debray, ac-
cused of complicity with Bolivia's
Communist guerrillas.
Military sources said they had
reports that Guevara and a group
of' about 35 guerrillas occuried
the small town of Alto Seco, deep
in the jungled hills of southern
Bolivia, for 52 hours last month.

propaganda meetings, urging the
men of the town .to join their
movement and attacking the
government of President Rene
Barrientos. They also bought
huge supplies of food and cloth-
ing before melting back into the
hills.
In September, the Bolivian
government presented photo-
graphs and documents to the
Organization of American States
meeting in Washington to back
up the claim that Guevara is in
Bolivia.
Guevara dropped from sight in
Cuba in the spring of 1965. There
have been reports from several
Latin American countries that he
has been fomenting revolution.
There also were reports that he
was dead.

Phone 434-0130
Enn axc r CARPEN TER RAD
Free OPEN 7:00 P.M. Free
Heaters NOW SHOWING Heaters
Shown at 7:40 Only
1E cOtOr'
ALSO_
Shown at
9:15 only
VUL~ui

I4

PUN

OF

'4 sAKt4k~ p~~ us

(Continued from Page 1)
University community enough to
stay and work here during the
summer, even if they don't. have
to take summer courses."
Some adjustment problems do
exist for students within the pro-
gram, and are acknowledged by
its administrators. Chavis, who
does most of the counseling with-
in the program, feels that many
of the QAP student's problems.
are "common to all students."
The deprived Negro student,
however, often undergoes "a gut
reaction" to the white classroom.
situation, said Chavis. He explain-
ed that this is often manifested
through not performing in the
classroom at the level the studentj
is capable of, and not participat-
ing in the usual extra-curricular
activities. In these cases, explain-
ed Chavis, the "usual problems
are intensified." Extra counseling
is made available to these stu-
dents to help them through their
difficulty.
Financial aid in the program
consists of whatever the student's
family can contribute, the rest
being absorbed by the University.
A summer job is required of the
student. The program remains the,
same through the next three years
of school, with the addition of a
part time job or a National De-
fense Education Act loan. This
semester's tuition increase had no
effect on the program, Marian
said. The University absorbed it
in paying for the OAP students'
tuition.
OAP is presently more than four
times as large as it was at its
inception, and will probably con-
tinue to grow. The image of the
University as a desirable place for
Negroes to go to college is spread-
ing, but according to Marion, "the

program itself won't do the job.
We 'need more public relations di-
rected toward the areas from
which we draw our OAP students."
OAP is an in-state program ex-.
clusively. It will 'not be expanded
to an out of state program in the
foreseeable future, said Marion,
because of the costs of recruit-
ing and of the extra counseling
and tutorial services that are in-
tegral to the program.
The local nature of the program
was criticized by Shaw. He feels
that the program should be ex-
panded to include all state uni-
versities in Michigan, and possi-
bly private universities in the
state. The statewide OAP program
could then be funded by a cen-
tral pool of state money. This
would enable a student to transfer
schools within Michigan should
circumstances call for it. For ex-
ample, a student at the University
finding the academics too difficult
could transfer to Michigan State
without losing his scholarship,.
There are many difficulties to
be worked out in such an expand-
ed program, however, before it
could be proposed, especially since
the OAP type of program is a new
one.

as

According to these
Guevara and the band
the town of 300 at night

reports,
encircled
and held

ERNESTO "CHE" GUEVARA

4AThONAL GENERAL CORPORATION __

3RD WEEK
NOW
SHOWING

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES
FO.AVILL6E
375 No. MAPLE RD. "769.1300

Showings Daily
2-:00-5:10
8:30

C7
.~Some
girls
would
blush **'.,
-not
Rose!

FlRNGQ RA3NAf
PRESENTS
A
RsE
EVERYSK; Ik

I

'V

I JjJ~jj[ ~ THE MIRICH CORPORATION PRESE~NTS N
JULIE ANDREWS MAX VON SYDOW- RICHARD HARRIS
inTHE GEORGE ROY HILL WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION of"HAWAII"PANAVISION' COLOR b Luxe

s

wth f n t
13. 13 pC10 LRNDU 9BUZZNNGR OKI8M IRMIRO~F
Starts Dial
TODAY 8-6416 '"sTONIGHT at 7 &, 9P.

4

M.

Who says they don't make
Westerns like. they used to?

4

HONORED BY SEVENTEEN MAGAZINE AS MOVIE OF THE MONTH!
WINNER OF SCHOLASTIC MAGAZINE BELL RINGER AWARD.

STARTS THURSDAY
"EXTRAVAGANTLY
BOLD and BIZARRE.'
--Bosley Crowh-r, N.-Y. ime
'MISS ZETTERLING
MAKES EACH SCENE
A WORK OF ART.
STUNNING EFFECTS."
-William Wolf, Cue Magazine
"THE VOYEUR'S
DELIGHT OF THE YEAR."
-Jd ih Crisf, World Jou alo Tribune
NihtGames
Starring INGRID THULIN
AFMITTANCE RESTRICTED TO
PERSONS OF AGE18 MIIMUM
Mon.-Thurs. 7, 9 P.M.
Fri., Sat. 7, 9 & 11 P.M.
Sun. 6,8 & 10 P.M.

"Sidney Poitier
a sensitive
performance!
A fine cast!"
-Seventeen Magazine
"Sidney Poitier
just perfect..
this film will
enthrall you!"
- Cosmopolitan Magazine
"Excellent .. .
an inspiring
filmi!"
--Parent's Magazine

"Sidney Poitier gives his
best performance !"
- Scholastic Magazine

"Sidney Poitier
great in 'TO SIR,
WITH LOVE''"
- Ed Sullivan. Daily News

A

A

"A colorful
kicky movie
in the
mod mood!"
Good Housekeeping
Magazine

We just did.
DuEAN1 GEORGE JEAN
IDARTI PEPPARD SiE10H
i nA MARTIN AINACKN PRODUCTION
ROUGH NIGHeT I JERICHO

I

III ONE.

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan