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December 13, 1908 - Image 11

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1908-12-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i 1

EASTERN STUDENTS
EARN A FORTUNI
Aggregate Rezeipts of Employed
Students Amounts to Nearly
$100,000.
By Donald L. Kincey.
More or less complete statistics re-
cently compiled shsow that many of the
students of the law department here are
earning their way throughs college. In
view of this fact, ansd that there are also
many students us other departments of
the university whso are dependent on
themselves, statistics from one of the
large easterin colleges msay not he out
of place at this time. These are all the
more interesting from the fact that C-
lumhia is located in New York City,
where, though the opportunities for em-
ploynsent are perhaps helter there than
anywhere else in thse country, the cost
of living is proportionately highser, and
hece employment for needy students
so much the msore necessary.
During the schsool periodof last year,
students at Columhia earised nso less thsan
$95,855. Thse ways us which they earned
money were as varied as the ailities
shsown, anid ranged frons tutoring to
chauffeuring. Thse greater portion of the
positions which yielded thec total amsount
of earnings was due, directly or indi-
rectly, to the activities of the commnittee
on employment for students, now a per-
msanent feature at Colusmhia. At thse
suggestion of President Low in 1895,
the university coumcil appointed this
commsittee, and the first year its efforts
brousghst is sonseswhat over $2,ow. Last
year thse amount reported as senug
earnetd directly throtsgh thle aid of the
commnittee was $28,766.15, or soore than
fourteen times as much as in the first
year. The money earned hy students
who dlut not report to the conmmittee
is more or less the result of its work,
sowever, for a great soassy of thse posi-
tions have heconse hereditary, one s-
denst passissg his positions down to a
friend, swithsout reportisng to the commit-
tee that msighst have originally securetd
hsim his emsploymsent.
Thse esmploysnt commisittee msaistains
a paidl secretary aist tsas persmanseist of-
fices is thse unisvrsity, similar tos the Y.
Al. CA. sere. Because of the many
ospportunsities afforded iss New York,
hsowever, they are enabled to fissd a muech
larger snshber of occuspationss iss whicts
to place thse iseedy stssdests. Accordissg
so she report, just issssed by thse rum-
msittee, swhichs is exhatsstive asse filled
sits cssmsparative tabltes, there were 38
recluests frois esspoyers, 323 of which
stere filled asnd 65p lost. There was a
total of 722 stssdensts registeredt swits thse
comssmittcc. Of thr msany positionss filled,
tutloring at prices frosm osse to three colo-
tars ass hsossr swas, perhsaps, thse msost
tsrofitabsle.
Iss the lass schsouol assd iss ttse non-Ipro-
fessiossal gradssate eshools, the earnisngs
prosvedto Is e thse largest. This is he-
cassse thss sssost of these are smess of ma-
tusrity, scllege gradusates, assd oftess
trassses teacsers, swhose abilities arc spe-
csifc rae sthmt lass gesseral. Lust year, 41
lass stuesnests reportesd $12,848.o9; is) thse
soss-profsssossal gradssate schools 68
ssudents rs. orted $s9,s88.ofi. The cons-
55555cc says stsal stssetess in thsese schools
can usss-lly snake thseir way withosst dif-
icsslty. At the sasme tisne, thse commuit-
tcse admsnsths~al stusdests in the schools
of ensgineering, smedicisne and architectssee
do not sire tlse time to do both college
andt ostsde work. In spite of extreme
effssrts it ss diffisslt for women studests
to sescsre ots'isde positions.
IThis yesr the total earsnings of thse
C.olumisoia -ttsdents fell off more tlsans
ssssss wig to thse widespread bssi-

sass stepressions. There sas a conse-
dfsiest fallinsg off is) thse net retusrns for
echrt psositions. This dteterrest the coso-
miltee frsss moakinsg ssssch progress iss
naew fields, lut large results are expected
next year ansd the total earnsings may go
beyond thse tswo hssndred thsousasnd smark.
Bust thme smost isnteresting tphase of this
year's report frosm thse cosmmnittee is thse
eessslts obtained frosm ass investigations,
msadte into thse records of all stusdensts
Isho had applied to the comnmsittee for
wvork durinsg the year. Using ass equal
Iluisuer of usnesmployed stuidessts, chosen

at random, tle investigation showed
that the employed students had a slightly
higher average than the unemployed.
Conversation with the men showed that
outside work forces them to more in-
tense application in the preparation of
their college work. ."In other words,"
says the report, "the higher marks mya
represent harder intellectual work, but
not necessarily stronger intellectuality."
A second investigation, made in the
first-year class of the law department,
showed that the unemsployed and em-
ployed students had about the same
average.
Besides fisding work for the needy
studests, the committee is also ale to
secure for them free medical advice
rons the best specialists in the city. The
studensl go to the private offies of the
physicians and receive the same alen-
ions afforded the wealthy patiest.
RHODES EXAMS WILL BE
HELD HERE NEXT AUTUMN.
Not until Octoer, iW9, will the next
qualifyinsg examinations for the Rhodes
scholarships be held iss the United States.
As is ssual the exanminations for the
State of Michigans will be held here
at the Uiiversity, being coducted by
a comssittee of whichs President Angell
is thse cairsian. After the examination
papers have beess sent to Oxford ad
graded, thesames of those who have
passed sill be sest ack to te committee
swhichs sakes the selections of te rep-
resentative finns this state.
Thse elected scholar will begins his
residessecis) Oxford us October, 191.
Scholarships will also be open in 191,
1913, 1914, andssd 0on, onitting every
third year.
Thse examisatioss are held is each
state assd territory to whichs scholarships'
Iaac eess assigset, at cesters to e
fixed bytshue local commssittees of selec-
tios. Th~is committee will appoint sit-
ablse persons o speerise the examnia-
tios, assd will arransge for its impartial
cossducst. Is tsosld esclearly sssderstood
thaltis examinssations ss not competitive,
hst sissply qua1fying ansi is smerely u-
tessdedt to gssveasssurassce tat every elect-
ed slolar siesurs sit to the standard'
of the first exaiminasion (Respoisions),'
whichthls.Uniiversity of Oxford de-
mnsds of all casdidates for tle BA.
degree. The. Rhodes scholars sil Ie
seectesdfsomnidisates who have su-
cessfslly assdsi tisequalifying examisa-
tios. Oseschlolais will be chosen fross
easch state sssd territory to which shol-
arships tsase 5beeniiassignec.
Cassdidates'-mnustbe sunmasrried, asnd
ssssst be cstsices of the Uiited States.
Cassdidatses are seligiblse wo hasec passed
theirsiseteestlsbirthssay but have ot
passed thseisr ssesstyfifths birthday, on
Octsosers esf lisayearinsswhich Iey are
eeletesd. IsIs has bens cecisedethlat all
schloars shallIhaeracishdIefore going
in1o residecnce as Oxford t least the
essdl of leirS'slopomore. or secissd yer's
swosklast sosmse recognissed degree-grait-
ssg unissitsy sr college sit theusitedh
States.
Casndidates mais iltctawhsther they swil
appltsy fisr th.eslsolasip of the stte r
territory is whishseb sy Isaise ctuired asy
siege part of thsir sedsctisosamqalifica-
tionis, esr fosrtst isfthe state. sr territory
is whichsthsy hvsse tsir ordinary Iriae
doisicile, bums. or resisdsssse. They msay
psss the qusalifyig xaminsssatissat asy
cesnter, but thssy must le pepared to
presesntthsesmseles befoe. elction to the
comisssitee in the saie or territiry tley
select. Nos cssdidatemsap cospete is
msore thsansose state or territory, either
ill the sssme year or iss successive years.
For the Restpossions Examssinatiosssto
tsr eld in October, 599, cniites will
tie examsinise nu the fottssissng ssbjcss
1 Arithsmetic-the swhoe.
2 Either the Elents (f Algebrai sr
the Eementis of Geomsery.
3 Greek Grsassmsar.
4 Latin Gransisar.

pTrsasslsitiossfrosssEnuglishs into Latiss.
6 tUnsprepiareh trasltioisn fromsssGreek
issd Litiss.
Or, Sispreparedh transslatioss frosssone5
of thseilansguags-s. ansi a bsook issthse
othser;
Or, tOss Greek assitonse Latins sunk.
~ITse texts ssed us thse examnsiaution
papers are thsose of thse scries of Oxford
C'. ssicat Texts, so far as these have
beenspsbshted hyyItse Oxford University
Press.

UNIVERSITY IS NOT
WITtIOUT ITS POETS
Profs. Scott and Kirk Among
Others Have Wooed the Muse
$100 Prize for Best Poem.
Perhaps the most striking thing about
college verse is that in most cases it
is the work of people who are ot poets.
To anyone who picks uap for the most
cassa glance a collection of real collegc
rhymes, it is at once evidest that us
very few of them is there any atempt
at anything beyond hmsorous jisglissg.
This is naturally the reasons 'hy college
verse is so very plesstifu, for poets are
as scarce in college as they are asy-
where. But if there is amie wes.
most meis are poetic in sosse degree, it
is isnjmust that period of yoathsumnally
spent in chasing phantosms of learning
arousid a tradiion-worns cmpnus. So we
have ini every university a fesw poets, a
great massysear-poets, and numsbserless
rtyiners. Any college man wo thinks
thsat tsr has the slightest degree of liter-
ary ability cosiders tteswriting of
poetry as quite within the sphere of his
proper endeavor and does not hesitate
to sissg whsenshemis sood seizes his.
tn 1898 is attemip was isade by mis
Ansn Arbor publiher to collect the bsctI
of thsr verse sicils adless Publised
in these periodicals, aid it was put otl
usder the title, "Varsity Verse Amosg
thse cisstribustors to tilsi little volusmse
were severa isess ow 00 te lierary
facsstsy. Prof. Louis A. Strauss, '94,
has ose little humsoros piece called
"Thie Poet Siged." Prof. Fred N.
Scott, '84, has 'a siussber of sssrt poens
ranginsg over us great miasy subjects.
Williami A. HeIcAssirew, '8.helo was
toa.stmaser st tie last Mihigan ass
quset, alsiscontsibu sites to tsis volume a
little lyric casied "scstacy
This.contributions b thoiemr sitho s arc
widelscivergentsnltmm eanabsut are for
thr sist sut typicit"collg verse
Thmeuamesic h cstbocur msost freusenty
are: I KPriedmssnits9,14Hsold MH
Bowmnits98 Hands.Caldweoll Perry
93, andsl Elsie JonsasCooey 8,whose
works arcsmreserious;VsW.1H.tlport
'88. Henuiry C Portr 93 rturM.
Smsilhs '97ussid Frankl Briscos,';
.A shorsiI timsefore."Vamrsity Vee"s
was srnedsi i'istsn rbte msc coni
of5 s eries'caled thei"Cp ,ssnslGown"
collectissm wass pbishesd ithte eas.d
Its editor Frederck1LawrenscKosls
inclsusashiseapimcesu by i1shignswries.
Arthur i\.Smisth, 11arolu lariss uBo
miai, ands"E. A.sHIt se te mss stosm
whousec iworks seres.choeanud1 (sic uni
signsedljinmgl wws cpiedI frssmsshlesain-
kle' Imm 93tthisisdnusmmmie sfthmes
srietspeardad itdhesnusmssbem(fAics
iganproductsie s israsd t ineteen.sc s
(31 theseeight acts. hisRicsardl hRay
Kirk, as preast onmstlesahetoisific5ucslt,
litstudisymig ts iolasris I sit
Hr. Kirk ws uslhs first mtstrityMicis-
ta osshdet who publishsledcl e scdcl-u
sisses fIis woru.eTs wo smsll Isllc
t hmavss Is encassiPusd11u AsssArbor,
tu' frtimcinsssg is1ro0tansuthm scoscssss
in 1905The is.rst o uf these, aclkul
"BruthserTotier"mdiscsseor thse mstss
Isrsurm ch sbjecs a s fusir macis goad
swine sanss comfsin tobatslsccoOe soss,
"A'oas TtoisusMichgn"which ws st
to musimcubly Losuis Elbel on, is wll
knsownimfrusnssius frequent rniionlssili
Its 190u6 sit irks scosndsl sslsms
apperared. Ituss mucshs mora srussoiu
aims anmd contaisnus a nmbsiler of tsausgt
fit orts. There s still a mcet udeal cf
sees de Sucala bitt avssi that is dlcd
edly' chatver assndmst of itlwsulblised
ass msagazines of highs stadig sefore
cehcte.tPerhaputs the most striknsg'amu

isadivislal osf the tioemss are a fesexe-
quisite nsegrsu lyrics, of very symspathetic
extpressieusandsrul muselody.
A-ichigansumIsusiomtlakedh sumgraduatatas
swho ace proucedliteratuse, (dmt oslsh
sue umsnssIsas gonesusa tstoIsdelvostehmt
self etrelytyohsposetry.IThisi w assrgc
Newell ILovejcoy,'6141, whsosh aasuccess-
ful caireer as a writar andmsh ususic in.
Steswart Edward Witseonsa of this most
famsous of the literary 'graduates, us best
knsown, of coursa, for bus storieslist
the magazines have printed souse of bus

poetry as welt and it is both nausical
and interestinig. Charles M. Gayley, now
teaching its a westerns college, wrote a
number of sonsgs of great literary ex-
cellence, our of which is thse best knsown
of Hichigan hsymns, "The Yellow 'amid
the Bluse." Thsre are masnsy other songs
swrittens by gradusates. Prof. F. N. Scott
has swritten niore of these than any other
onse Hichigssspoet.
Amsonig Hichsigan usidergraduates dtsere
are mnsy swho aspire to gauin recognsision
frons tieme se, amiddtse prize of $ioo
to be ascarded foe thse best poemsthlis
comsinsspsring'i will prosbsably bssits1ots
massy suniknownpoets.Omse of thecmost
prousinsg osin oicsalsly siclsssad stat-
dentswo haveibye ncashsere ussrecesst
years wias itausold Sriasn Stacla, mowho.
iid dssrissg thec past sssss.sssas IHa sas
si membesru 5of tie5Lanthsornes.ituerary
clsub, ch'5sci s onse of thea casuas organi-
zatioussdsevoted tl itersary pwork sn genu-
ral andsuIcs specifsi-ally to poetry. From
thea mesmssbsrshsspsofthsss clus fromsthle
Stylsss, asimilausorgoaiutionumof women,
sussdlftrem thsewolsuae workinsgsalouse
thse poctsry hprizeus expected iso bringsaa
sarsvest asf efforts slisaad hre. uscertains
tas Iesa omtingi5 of ralaileeamomsg
thsens.

lla\JlSTI 'I1iiAIIR.
Ih ldeuulsgacsarastidnsof thsuater-goers
will resssmsss "sPIte"c'iskercsosuCrEs
an5dt Ibcus famessAnnsArbritesussasims
aoportsuniyss eei ng555 .5d((55 c5g s'uisaa
withs Ba kerstius weaek beinnuusig Msoss-
day As usa sioryptalleadiaseccdactoe,
ands' 's igersaie'wil prisiasisy affssrsd sne
oftebs ctofeeatsc theicatjestic.
Anosther feasuecullisa theictci sf
WshitusmausslDii s wshos ccl5l1preseist a
usmiissrcomsdsyuas onis th-om tp
iso daste sosngs.VWimansssanissl1-scis save
us the pa-5isstb eas prominently identsifiead
south musical -ansi facecouiedysi
Ie aS't.iiasu iissu-o illsppa ishechcia-
aciar of 5<155hihclasi elmys iii.
PFor tisreccyears tiesaou sS'taeie.
io usof grotesquesa'csroibat-.sowus sasdraw-
in icar ithiihes Barnisshssi-si and
thea samuisairitisc' s wllaper sduais" tse
comsing" eeiunthmirscosas cr batsuicssu
usus horionulbariscis.
Mhousnss'pictusru'eisanea' toiAnAsi'rbor
wil hesee a eepyperforansssuce us
aiionot hesi a audvislls'e, andsson iWedi-
is.da ta fist sf a sasotiofsansw sosuveniri
futdses justrecaeivi edsfrsntiDresdeas
wsillih iscsstosalllasdiis whto'itundisi
tis'e s's'su- 5i a' Ie sassigaiss a nnounc-
es as usauineeaCh r ssssiistm s a iusduihesill sf
f, r Critma 'siic lisaddb
muialciniii5..actsaispslsyisngfistiees
prncpas ndchrsessgirls-us - ussst
ea sissie tis;usisn th 'swpyuof a s'sislei
act paesentein siis cat'.

GIRLS' SOCIETIES
FOSTER LITERATURE
Omega Phi and Stylus Organized
in True Acedemic Spirit-Rapid
Growth Since First Meeting.
What literary organizations have the
wonsen ons the campus? What are they
acconmplishiusg? These are questions
cohichs msifht contlIe answered at this
tne, wvhens we sre haring so much
abhoit sue activitie of the iens along
this hine. There are iwo such organi-
zaations 'oeUnivesity swomen-the Ome-
ga Phi ansI the Sylus.
Thse girls of the Uiversity had lng
believed that a literary oganization,
wheree they might meet for social and
intellectsual culture, and so promote in-
terest along literary usnes its the Ui-
versity, was a great necessity. There
cwere several suchm organizatins for the
mses, 5usd ushapiily nose for the girls.
Ands so, beieving that they could pro-
motuue iis interest by muua association
anss ublic literary effort, a society
knsownounuderthe uame of the Sigma
Phi, cas organiaed on December 13,
1905.
Them uinutes of their first nieeting read
afolisows: "At a meeatig held at New-
bessy fill Decembuier 13 903 for the
pupse of orgaiinzsg a cwomen' s liter-
ary aociaty Mss Howart, 0, acted
as prsiasdent, andu Mss Jensen as se-
retary"After Hiss itowartb had stat-
cid the ibict sfuthe smeeingand the
naees of litearay wok amon the women
of tsa Unsversisty he officers for the
yerwr lced.L Iatr onsJanuary
27 muio6,thec niaeof Sgna Phi was
canugedl iiiOmsega Pi, and the society
isis casnsiuesduhussesl that namse.
Iheur soere mussfaculty memsbes at
thiss fissmetinug, just a few of the
lUiveasrsiy gunls swho tried mu Iis way t
orguaae hierary spirit whelmh slurp
flt sueexistesd.
Thesmeinscigs of ue Onmega Phi are
hseldi sssec oiler Satusrday at our o'clock
il tihe Alpha Nurooams, ansd consist of
ais opeluaurry- se eingto cw-hich they
ara gladh to welcssusicall girls of thur Uni-
v ecsiy usaud se reular iusness nmeet-
ing' wch-onisuy heuambies atend.
5The grohs seuenhia pid dsring the
55sd yearusot ouly is membeshisup, which
s lisatediss it',but alsoutu he way the
isrkisis eems arriiamunhooawrd ac-
comaishisag te ensu for which it was
orgssani usasaplyipomoe literary
cusli're-i'amonug i ssbrs
=.1marssinr f Iilinteparysujecs are
issclussea in thirutsork such as sippe-
ciationf iithos, revews on teir work
ainuilifuanussubje-~cs of crent
inrssi 5hissfiiiths year the useet-
in aea-la-t wtith curend evets,
saskreiestandusisiiaat sories
ifihcers iarualctehasasery sssmester
snds:Itsithat5utie a~s ssarcsuaea for the
ntran mcu i sof he cork to e
c5ar isn huisgs ueheet five mosths.
Thss otheissticsrary sssciylisa Sylus,
tassosrgauniuzedh is ssrecutly anditunism-
bueship supmsors sasrcedh.d W he the
tyIsus ~is rsscusalip for girls wih lit-
eraryusuiaubii i rscshsortethe Omse-
"-i Phisfoustue assrslierar cultaure.
"beievestsa tshthesre s a wis dcfield
sassear wr frUnive rsto women,"
sidi'P isMissssom aue onizmler of tie
'-5us h andiis crainlyp, when Vassar asse
PP sihslct sosmenshaviswsictuutesn plays for
yas, sMiciganstswosmnIsisve cvery rea-
sonu tsi faelthuat tyso anacieve
scsieusidresults isltg ths humu.
-p s aof bringing together
girhs of a ithuera.y5tuss of minsd to aid
°[ t-mis(iis knd of work,
the Stylusswis ioransid last Marc.

'The instarestseied-s ashamtishe firtt mnetinig
iselsot tse hsimsuofact Hiss Doinnme shouweud
cleaurlyytsat itsereawassainplace for ass or-
ganuizaitionu of tis sae on the camnsps-
iss fasct tse place adssiong been waiting.
'lis a isnifiau iss for nmembershuip iii
:ue cubsire spiacific. No freshmnen are
mliil.iadheusmembuershsip is linsited
to ass susndergradsuatses, who must first
Ises-a-ssssesihdeu IbispProfessor Scott.
I'aich umesmber, unaturalnly, snust blinmter-
estedh ins writinsg, and able to write.
Heetin's are hetid carry othuer week ont
'T'suesday eveninigs, at the homes of the
differs-stumesmbelres.
-u - NH. Conx.

AssuisuanttMisialsircesstsa rsum"C iiussrc
p.rf Hensy -all Dyke -'a' sit tis
giiu'u'a-s iit aisn' iss strio l~tares mud
proifaessorsh'ni ai '' a ' s is)'y (isA llinsce
bse lbheS.pirit of Amesricai." lHe wfll
iscnr tt w ii(sice aseksotsarc mc--sithis.
Ps c p i ia cin:hwilleteasi-' t hue Frencah
uiv1sis i 55
A pusaa ariate cit faiculty audstsus-
dhenstsiwass hld-ecentlhyat the Ussiver-
city of Wssisgashsghistoarsesnt s hsusiamusu
tsar mu fisotbssllgamss.

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