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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 09, 1917 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

7. / THE MICHIGAN DAILY -T

RAIN INTERFERES WITH
CLSS BASELL NES
SCHEDULE THROUGH MAY 17 OUT;
TWO CONTESTS PLAYED
THIS- WEEK
Water polo may be organized in a
few days to keep the class team base-
ball players in practice for their post-
poned battles. As long as the rain in-
terferes with playing off the regular
schedule, the games will be postponed
and played at the end of the list.
The schedule, exclusive of postpon-
ed games, follows: Thursday, May 10,
senior engineers vs. soph lits; fresh
lits vs. fresh engineers. Saturday,
May .12, senior engineers vs. junior
lits; senior lits vs. junior engineers;
fresh lits vs. soph engineers; soph lits
vs. freshman engineers. Monday, May
14, junior lits vs. junior engineers;
soph lits vs. soph engineers. Wednes-
day, May 16, senior lits vs. senior eng-
ineers. Thursday, May 17, junior lits
vs. fresh engineers; junior engineers
vs. fresh lits.
Only two games have been played
this week. Fresh lits beat the senior
engineers 6 to 5 Monday, and the jun-
ior lits beat the soph engineers 2 to 1.
A game is scheduled today between
the senior lits and the soph engineers.
Women Give Doctors' Medicine Cases

TO BOOM SPORTS
AT END OF WAR
New Type of Athlete Expect# to
Spring Up Following
Conflict
New York, May 8.-Although the war
has eliminated the major portion of
athletic competition throughout the
European countries, sport has not been
entirely abandoned and there is plenty
of evidence to support the belief that
there will be a general revival of ath-
letics following the declaration of
peace. Many close observers of the
physical condition of the troops have
stated as their opinion that the train-
ing necessary to fit the young men
for the modern battlefield has pro-
duced a new type of European man-
hood, which will instinctively turn to
sports with extraordinary zest as soon
as arms are laid aside.
Competition on War Fronts
It is a matter of record that many
forms of athletic competition are con-
stantly being indulged in on all fronts,
just back of the firing lines, and these
games are particularly encouraged by
both the French and English army
authorities. Football, baseball, golf,
cricket, wrestling, boxing, and foot
racing are all participated in by the
soldiers off duty and it is said that
some remarkable performances are
witnessed from time ,to time when the
handicaps under which the games are

PiCK MEN FOR TENNIS
CLUB AND CLASS TEAMS
UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATION
QUARTET HAS TWO
MATCHES
Teams have been picked to repre-
sent the classes competing in the in-
terclass tournament and also the Uni-
versity Tennis club.
Of the four men named on each class
team, the first named man will act as
captain of that quartet and any in-
formation regarding the tournament
may be had by getting in touch with
him. Opportunity for making a place
on one of the class teams may be had
by challenging the fourth named man
before Saturday evening.
The class teams are: Juniors-Eg-
bert, Hamer, Hurdley, and M. Wel-
ford. Sophomores-Bartz, Harrison,
Davidson, and Strouse. Freshmen-
Westbrook, Kelsey, Breakey, and
Schlee. The senior team will be chos-
en by Pawley.
The schedule for this league is:
Monday, May 14; Freshmen vs. Soph-
omores, and Juniors vs. Seniors.
Egbert, Westbrook, Bartz, and Har-
rison have been chosen to play as
the University Tennis club aggrega-
tion. This team will meet the Grand
Rapids Y. M. C. A. and the Cleveland
Tennis club. No date for these match-
es has been set.
Shirts made to measure. G. H. Wild
Co., Leading Merchant Tailors. State
at. tf

FORESTERS START FIELD
TRIP TO FARM FRIDAY
THREE-DAY EXPEDITION TO IN-
CLUDE STUDY, CONTESTS,
AND BARBECUE
The annual foresters' field day will
be held this week end, the foresters
leaving Friday noon for. the forestry
farm, just west of Ann Arbor, and
returning Monday morning. H. T. Gis-
borne, '17, chairman of the committee
in charge, has arranged with Profes-
sors Filibert Roth and P. S. Lovejoy
for talks and demonstrations of forest-
ry work.
Saturday is to bevisitors' day, and
contests of all sorts, including trap
shooting, packing contests, canoe
races, swimming contests and baseball
games will be held for the benefit of
friends who visit the camp. A barbe-
cue will be held Saturday noon.
The trip is open to all, and 50 cents
will be charged for all who are not
members of the club. The pack train

will leave the Natural Science build-
ing court Friday noon;
YESTERDAY'S GAMES

American League
Cleveland ....................5
Detroit...... ..............2
New York................4
Philadelphia...............2
Chicago ....................7
St. Louis.................9
Boston at Washington, rain.
National League
New York................5
Philadelphia.....1
Boston ....................2
Brooklyn ....................1
Only two games played.

10
3
6
9
11
10

1
1
0
3
5
0

New York.........10
St. Lo"is1............1
(11ic.)g;u............12
Clevehl-d...........11
Detroit. .............6
Athletics ............ 6
Washington ..........6
National league
IV.
New ok ... ....... .10
St. Loui s............12
Chicago.............14
Philadelphia ......... 8
Boston .............. 7
Cincinnati............11
Brooklyn .............5
Pittsburg............. 7

7 .588
9 .550 ,
10 .545
10 .524
11 .353
11 .353
11 ,353

L.
5
7
9
8
8
13
9
15

Pct.
.666
.632
.609
.500
.467
.458
.357
.318

12
5

11
1

6 1
4 1
Pct.
.733

ElW TI~ER BA'EiAlAL CAPTAIN
ELECT El UNiDElIt A PROVISO
Princeton, N. J., May 8.-P. D. Lee
of Silver 'pring, Md., has been elect-
ed c :ptnin of the Princeton baseball
team fr next ear "if the war is over
by that time." Lee is planning to en-
ter an oficeers reserve camp.
For results advertisc in The Mi hi-
gan Daily.

HOW THEY STAND
American League
W.I

Boston .............11

4

L.
4

The women of the Homoeopathic played are taken into consideration.
Hospital guild are going to consider- In the Scandinavian countries steady
able expense in equipping the doctors progress in the development of athletic
who leave the school for governmental standards is reported, notwithstand-
service with special medicine cases. (Continued on Page Four.)

Columbia Alumnus Fosters Athletic Phi beta Kappa

For more than two years Dr. George
L. Meylan, head of the physical educa-
tion department at Columbia, has been
working on plans to institute at Col-
umbia an intercollegiate honorary so-
ciety, corresponding to Phi Beta Kap-
pa. Such societies already exist. at
Yale, Minnesota, and several other uni-
versities.
Last week such an organization was
made possible at Columbia by Gustav-
us T. Kirby, prominent alumnus and
now chairman of the advisory commit-
tee of the I. C. A. A. A. A. Mr. Kirby
offered to pay for the insignia and tro-
phies to be given to the club and its
members, and his offer has been ac-
cepted officially by the university com-
mittee 'on athletics and by the depart-i
ment of physical education.
Under the terms of the organization
membership will be limited to those
athletes who can qualify in easy try-
outs in several events, especially pro-
vided for the track men. In a letterl
to Coach T. N. Metcalf of the track1
team, Mr. Kirby wrote as follows:
That every student, alumnus and1
officer of the university be invited to4

take part in the following tests: To
run 100 yards, to run one mile, to
broad jump, to bar vault for height,
to swim 100 yards, to climb a rope.
That anyone who responds to such
invitation be given during any one
week as many trials at each event
as he may desire.
The standards are as follows: 100-
yard dash, 12 seconds; mile 'run, 6
minutes; bar vault, 5 feet; broad
jump, 14 feet; rope climbing, 20
feet, cross over three ropes, and
come down the fourth; 100-yard
swim, 2/ minutes.
Mr. Kirby is of the opinion that such
a club would aid in military training
and is therefore most desirable at the
present time at Columbia.
Columbia Spectator sees in the form-
ation of the organization indications
of a more universial participation in
athletics on the part of all rather than
a few students. Commenting editorial-
ly, under the caption, "Athletes All,"
the Spectator says in part:
"Ever since football was restored
here at this university two years ago
Columbia athletic authorities have had

uppermost in their minds the idea of
universal indulgence in athletics on
the part of all the undergraduate stu-
dents. Various plans have been sug-
gested from time to time, but each
failed to take into account the lack of
adequate facilities on Morningside
Heights.
"At last a really practical sugges-
tion has been received, and the offer
which Mr. Kirby has made to the Ath-
letic association is a very happy one.
As he states, 'It is wise to encourage
a few star athletes to the end that en-
thusiasm for competition shall be
maintained and interest in sport
aroused, but is is far more important
to encourage athletic efficiency on the
part of all to make them better able
to carry the burden of life and serve
their fellows and the state.'
"With this purpose most prominent
the offer is exceedingly apropos at the
present time. The country as a whole
has just awakened to a realization of
the need of preparedness, and Mr. Kir-
by's plan aims to further this move-
ment as far as physique of Columbia
students is concerned."

I

White Skirts

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front of weii=i l dessed men; wear lothi~e you'l.be rou:of,.2:to$50
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IJil THEI '( SOETH BAT EL OCEYBAD LTd.l~:

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For Sports Wear

For Afternoons

For Every Summer "Occasion"

$2.

75

$3.50

$3.98

$5

If white skirts have ever been at all desirable or convenient in a summer
wardrobe, they are absolutely indespensable this year.
Therefore they have been made in so many attractive models-in so many
degrees of simplicity and fluffiness-with so many kinds of belts and pockets
and trimmings.
Gabardines-famous and favored because they are both easy to launder
and extremely serviceable; figures, revived for a certain engaging freshness
and crispness; cotton poplins, attractively soft and less "crushable" than the
usual run of white washable skirts--and still other materials.
In addition to all white skirts there are some with bright colored printings
on belt and pocket-and some with all-over patterns.
They have shirred and plain patch pockets, and heaps of novelty ones-
belts shirred and plai nand narrow and wide-and scores of unusual touches
that take them out of the ordinary white-skirt class and make them distinctively
HUTZEL SKIRTS.

Main and Liberty

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N.

-!D AT TPQ

I-qv pp m 1

TWVi

'110 'u1

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