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May 09, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-09

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-ih4 1Y11..IUA~3IiN I.JA-IL Y

_

WEDNEiSDAY, MAY 9, 19*17.

u1nu I ElWnu1 E1
OFFICERS' RESERVE

held at Stockholm.
Scandinavian Congress Held
This congress was formed at the
suggestion of the Swedish A. A. U.,
and was attended by representatives
from the athletic organizations of
Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. At
this conference it was agreed that the

new body should have full charge of
all arrangements looking toward ath-
letic meets among these three nations
or with teams from other countries
which may later desire to compete
against an all-Scandinavian combina-
tion.
A committee was appointed to pre-

pare a new code of eligibility and com-
petitive regulations that will be uni-
form throughout Scandinavia. It was
informally announced that this step
was deemed advisable in view of the
athletic challenges which this associa-
tion is prepared to issue following the
close of the war.

. S. SHEPPARD GOES TO NEW
YORK; TWO OTHERS LEAVE
FOR FORT SHERIDAN
Two members of the electrical en-
neering teaching staff have gone, a
iird is gone temporarily, and it is
xpected that he will be called per-
anently to serve the country in the
gineering officers' reserve.
Assistant Professor Harry S. Shep-
ard, in charge of the work in tele-
iony and telegraphy, was summoned
New York by telegraph Sunday and
is thought by other members of the
aff that the call is in connection
ith some studies in signal work.
rofessor Sheppard has received a
,ptaincy in the engineering officers'
serve and is expecting to be trans-
rred to the signal corps.
Mr. A. H. Lovell left for Fort Sheri-
n yesterday morning. Mr. Lovell
as advised that his commission for
,ptaincy in the engineering reserve
rps was on the way and he would
ceive it upon his arrival at Fort
'ieridan.
Mr. Ward F. Davidson left Sunday
r Fort Sheridan. Mr. Davidson has
ceived a commission as second lieu-

7
'4W~~R~~ ~ --

L.

?overnor Sleeper
Signs Damon Bill
residential Suffrage Bill Approved
by State Executive After
Long Fight
Lansing, Mich., May 8.-Governor
eeper signed the Damon presidential
Lffrage bill today. He used 10 pens
the operation in order that each
'the group of women active in get-
ng the bill passed might have one.
Those who witnessed the ceremony
cluded Mrs. 0. H. Clark of Kalama-
xo, president of the Michigan Suf-
age association; Mrs. E. L. Caulkins
Battle Creek; Mrs. Florence Bul-
im of Jackson; Mrs. Lucy Burns,
>rt Huron; Mrs. Wilbur Brotherton
Detroit; Mrs. Christopher J. Par-
ll of Jackson; Mrs. Alton T. Rob-
ts of Marquette; Mrs. William Blake
Grand Rapids; Mrs. John C. Brande,
alamazoo; Mrs. Ida Chittenden, Lan-
ng; Mrs. B. G. Jennison, Bay City;
rs. Thomas F. Lansford, Ann Arbor;
rs. Ross Moore, Mrs. F. C. Aldinger,
id Mrs. C. L. Waters, Lansing.
FlORAL UNION USHERS HEAR
PROF. STANLEY AND C. A. SINK
Sixty Choral union ushers held their
cond annual banquet at the Michi-
in Union Tuesday evening. R. M.
rson, '17, acted as toastmaster.
C. A. Sink, secretary of the Univer-
ty Musical society, entertained the
en with an account of some of his
rsonal experiences during the last
eek with people who attended the
stival concerts and also with some
the artists who appeared.
Dr. A. A. Stanley of the School of
sic expressed his gratitude for the
anner in which the ushers handled
e crowds.
LRTMOUTH CLUB HONORS MAN
WHO SAVED "OLD STONE FACE"
Hanover, N. H., May 8.-The Dart-
outh Outing club has awarded a
adal to Rev. Guy Roberts of Little-
n, N. H., for his part in saving "The
d Stone Face" in Franconia Notch,
ade famous by Nathaniel Hawthorne.
v. Roberts discovered that the rock
rming the forehead of the face had
pped into a precarious position. He
cured state aid for preventing fur-
er deterioration of the natural won-
r.
EALTH SERVICE TAKES 2070
CALLS AND 32 NEW PATIENTS
University health service reports
ow 2,070 office calls for the month
April, with 32 new patients. There
re 285 treatments for different
roat diseases, 24 cases of measles,
e cases of scarlet fever, five cases of
eumonia, one case of whooping
ugh, and 48 physical examinations
re given.

OTIS SKINNER IN "MR. ANTONIO" AT THE WHITNEY THEATER, MAY 16
DOCTORS ASKED TO O ADVERTISING MANAGER
TO AID OF OUR ALLIES EXPLAINSPRINCIPLES
AMERICAN MEDICAL MEN MAY BE "SIMPLIFY," IS ADVICE GIVEN BY
HONORED BY FIRST CALL E. S. BABCOX OF THE FIRE-
TO SERVICE STONE RUBBER CO.
Chicago, May 8.-An appeal to the "Simplify" was the keynote of the
doctors of America has been relayed talk on advertising given by E. S.
by Dr. Franklin Martin, head of the Babcox, advertising manager for the
medical division of the council of na- Firestone Rubber company, last even-
tional defense, the original appeal ing in the lecture room of the Natural
coming from spokesmen of the English Science building. It was full of in-
and French commissions. who have teresting and forceful comments on
been discussing with American states- the methods employed by advertising
men the participation of this country men and salesmen.
in the war, the degree and character "Advertising is as necessary for
of its services. modern industry as the great guns are
Europe Drained of Doctors for the war in Europe. Industry deals
"At Washington Mr. Balfour told with production, exchange and dis-
me that the need was imperative for tribution. Advertising is a branch of
doctors," said Dr. Martin Monday. distribution. The advertising which a
"Hundreds of the European physicians firm does is the 'curtain-fire' for the
who rushed into service when the salesmen who must follow."
war broke out have been killed or dis- He added that what the people want
abled. The civilian population of Eu- when they are looking for advertising
rope has been drained of its medical men is "practical stuff." His advice
men, and England and France look to was to study the manufacture of an
America to come to the rescue. article before you attempt to adver-
"There is a feeling in France that tise or sell it.
the entire work of the French ambu- Examples were given which showed
lance corps should be put in the hands the way in which simple but sys-
of American doctors. The work of the tematic advertising produced results.
American ambulance at Paris has Persistent, not spasmodic advertising
demonstrated what the United States is to be preferred, according to the
can do along these lines." speaker.
Need 2,000 Officers A four-reel picture was shown, il-
In his appeal for a mobilization of lustrating the principles which Mr.
medical forces, Dr. Martin states that Babcox expounded. It was of very
2,000 medical officers for France and practical benefit to all those inter-
England and 5,000 ambulance attend- ested in sales or advertising. The
ants would scarcely fill the require- faults of an amateur salesman were
ments, and that a prompt response explained, and the remedies necessary
should meet the request of the allies, for their correction.
who, Dr. Martin declares, have dis-
tinguished the medical profession by There is opportunity in The Michi-
asking for doctors first. gan Daily Ads. Read them.

9 7M
/p
er fr Eh
ti n ..r ies .7 . aferisromLother t - r

I

Mark he outside di erence in the
tri lines f oteir graceful extra size.
Behold the insie derence in
that bare sectin the rub
her saturatedt o-p CableCOrd
body of a SilvertoW n tre.

ar

)0 i i~ IISl tii f firlo w n~ i .

Iowa
vol"h
:ae;-7 "T,"'r .,-, fin,-t, r.. ^ - ; _ -r-zr +- >} _xcz:rm .Y:

1. Icreased e-
z::ne powe-r.
2. Ccoother rid-
ing.
3. Fuel saving.
4. Speedier.
5 Coastfarther.
C . Ivrt'icker.
7.Lazai er L o
gc e.
F. Give greater
9. MorLresistive
against punc-
ture.
10. Repaired ecas-
zig and per-
manently.

UNDER THE JNSd'
but THREE tires.

there

are

FABRIC,

swathed

in five

to seven plies.

* FIIFUnnnF JFSOIUnuF~u, JFFIFFFFFFFaIF FIFFIF IFIFFI I F115,

AT THE THEATERS

AT THE WHITNEY

Otis Skinner in "Mister Antonio"'
will be seen at the Whitney theaterl
Wednesday, May 16. This play was
written especially for Mr. Skinner by
Booth Tarkington, and has been de-
scribed as a comedy of cheerfulness.
In it Mr. Skinner plays the role of an
Italian organ grinder.
Others in the cast are Eleanor
Woodruff, Joseph Brennan, and Rob-
ert Harrison.
AT THE WHITNEY
I). W. Griffith's "The Birth of a Na-
tion" returns to the Whitney theater
for a two day engagement, starting
Friday afternoon, May 18. Scenes of
battles, of raids by the Ku Klux Klan,
and the assassination of President Lin-
coln and the surrender of Lee to Grant
are some of the features of the film.

en part photo-drama adapted from Ed-
win Milton Royle's stage success by
the same title. Beatriz Michelena, the
well known emotional actress, plays
the leading role. The fashion of the
modern play to denote modern life as
a hopeless, helpless, and meaningless
existence is boldly denied in "The Un-
written Law," in favor of the assump-
tion that men and women may learn
from their own mistakes and that hope
need never depart utterly from those
who retain love. The story is whole-
some and big and develops through
breathless suspense to a most thrilling
climax.
Staten Island Club to Help Red Cross
New York, May 8.-At a meeting of
the general committee in charge of
the arrangements for the Red Cross
benefit cricket match, to be played on
the grounds of the Staten Island
Cricket andsTennis clubat Livingston,
S. I., on Decoration day, it wasdecided
that the entire proceeds should be
handed over to the American branch
of the British Red Cross. All inci-
dental expenses, where not donated
gratis, will be met by voluntary con-
tributions of the committee.
'O BOOM NEW TYPE OF
SPORTS AFTER THE WAR

THREAD WEB, a five to
seven ply MASS OF
S TRING.
CABLE COD, the unique
two-ply, rubber-Satrated,
patent- roi cted tire body,
found ONLY in Silver-
town, the original cord tire.
You cannot afford to be without
Silvertown's difference i. sSr1 Ce,
its smoother riding comfort, srter

-v%-n'vP " ,I.n a W S

s re r e~ ,-v C.rti a , _4L+rY.0 1.1, "rC

i

appearanceI1 UnUIILL USL~lae-b(iUn ;~ Y?
- e
economy.
Where You See Th'. S THE U.r.bUUU1 ILII 1-floAr
" Akron, Ohiot- -
Goodrich also makes the famous fabric
tires--
GoodrichBlack Safety Treads
1 \,
Goodrich Tires are handled in Ann Arbor by

AT THE MAJESTIC

tal Professors Go to Iochester
R. W. Bunting, secretary of the
1 college, and Dr. N. S. Hoff left
evening for Rochester, N. Y.,
e they will attend the dedication
e George Eastman dental dis-
ry in connection with the New
state meeting. Building this dis-
ry at a cost of $1,500,000, was
possible by Mr. Eastman. It
are for the teeth of Rochester's

Edith Taliaferro heads the cast of
the Frohman production of Booth Tar-
kington's "Conquest of Canaan" which
will be shown at the Majestic today
and tonight. Miss Taliaferro recent-
ly was seen as the star of "Young Wis-
dom," at the Criterion theater, New
York.

AT THE ARCADE
''The Unwritten Law," to be shown
at the Arcade theater today, is a sev-

(Continued from Page Three.)
ing the fact thatthese nations are
far more affected by the great conflict
than neutrals at a greater distance.
An example of the upbuilding and
broadening of sport throughout this
section of Europe is found in the re-

Cadillac Garage
327 S. Main St.
Phone 1625

Ann Arbor Garage
206 W. Huron
Phone 1101

cent Scandinavian athletic congress

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