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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 09, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ie Largest Assortment
f fine woolens in the city is here for your inspection. We think you'll
gree that never have you seen classier fabrics. Tailored in our in-
nitablo Style in a suit to your measure, they will make you as smartly
ressed as any man in town.

G. H.
Leading Merchant Tailors

Wild Company
STATE STREET

E£ :&r.ido Agatt A&t £
Official newspaper at the University of
MWragan. Published every morning excVpt
M.nday during the university year. t
entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Ofces: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $. 50; b mail, $ .os.
Want ad. stations : &arry's; Studento' Sup-
:tore;- The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
nsa: Business, ,6e; Editorial, 24x4.
Communications not to exceed 30 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:3o o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church.............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn...... ..... ... .City Editor'
Harold A. Fitzgerald........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor

SliPYARDS

H-1L UiJ.~1l"~ I

"

NEED'

MEN

Lee's Slotted, Throat
TENNIS RACKETS
The Slater Book Shop
Phone 430 336 S. State St.

Bicycles

Switzers'
Hardware

Rackets

Bicycle ,
Repairing
Key Fitting
Razor Blade
Sharpening

Base Ball
Goods

Lawn Mowers

310 State
Only Hardware
Near Campus

i

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD

& CO.

Gives you the best Tailoring ,service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

f06 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

- .1

We Offer You
.CURITY - - SERVICE - LOCATION

Resources $3, 8oo,ooo

Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office-
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Ofice~-
707 North University Ave.
D Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SEOURITY - - - EFFICIENCY.
enient and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
leased With Our Service. Two Offices
105 8. Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
. - Typewriters
F Typewriting
Mimeographing
O. D. MORRILL,
Baltimore bunch. 322S. State St

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on. Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Li nmea ano axpress Cars-7--35 a.
m., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:1
p. n.
Kalamnazoo Limied, Car-8 :48 e. m ands
evefr two hours to 6:48 p. m.; to .Lansing,
8 :43 P. m.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
An. Arbor)-,9:48 a. m. andrevery two hours
to 7z:48 p. am.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:3 a. m., 6:4 a.
as., 11:e3 a. m. and every two hours to 7:e5 P.
M.,, 8:eS 'p. Mi., 9:9S p. in., 10 :50 p. Mn. to
Ypsilanti onlyp :zo a. in., 9:sa:50 ., s:op
rm.,. 6:e3 p. mn, 11:45 P. In., 1z : a. in., t:zr
a. m: To Saline,"change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound.-6o5 a. m., :5o a.
Mn., 1e:20 p. im.. 1:20 s . iM.
Swan
Twenty-two remarkable photo-
graphs of the Greek Play. Come
in and see them.
713 Im. VNIV IRSITY
vELERS Alarm Clocks
$ 1 .00 U
'1 uer y. E y
Fountain Pens-
Waterman ad Conklin
U. of M. jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
MODERN BARBER SHOP
332 State St.
A Particular Place
for Particular People.
FRANK C, BOUCH, Prop,

Marian Wilson... ..........Women's Editor
[eonard W. Nieter....Ass't Telegraph Editor
DeForrest S. Rood.........Exchange Editor
I. It. Campbell...Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip mery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Herne...Asuistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau...Assistant Business Manager
.Night Editors
C. M. ticklngNihEdtr H. M. Carey
B. A. waney J. L. Stadeker
E. L. Zeigler
Reporters
C. S. Clark James Schermerhon, Jr.
R. H. Fricken G. 0. Broph
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. MigeU
Annetta L. Wood F. A. Taber
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrews R. T. McDonald
K. L. Webmeyer Eugene Given
P. W. Gordon L. Helmuth Maag
E. L. Rice
Business Staff
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson .Earl F. Ganschow
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
Walter R. Payne Bernard Wi
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1917.
Night Editor-D. H. Cruttenden
CO-OPERATION FOR THE LITS
Thursday afternoon sees the literary
college enter the ranks of drill com-
panies on the campus. Opportunity
is afforded every man in the college
to learn the rudiments of military
training. That the action of the fac-
ulty meets a need cannot be doubted.
Many students have been drilling in
irregular organizations for more than
a month.
But the time for training is short.
Only four weeks of drill are to take
place. In order that every man may
get the futll good of tie instruction
each must subordinate himself to the
whole. Further, the success of the
movement depends in part upon the
number who turn out, and "stick."
Every man who signs for the course
tacitly says that he is ready to accept
military authority. Obedience is a
first requisite, and the first order is-
sued 'by the commandant is that of
absolute attendance. Students cannot
become accustomed to submission to
orders too soon. Start training in
full force, prepared to appear every
day no matter what the circumstances.
Concentration must be the watch
word of the organization. The literary
college now has its opportunity to
turn out en masse, unify itself, and
produce by the time of final examina-
tions, a drill corps worthy of testify-
ing to the interest and efficiency of
literary college students.
HAVE SWING-OUT ON MAY 16
But a short time ago it seemed ad-
visable to change the date for the an-
nual senior Swing-out from Wednes-
day, May 16, to Monday, May 14. Yes-
terday the literary faculty decided to
hold drills on Monday and Thursday
afternoons. Only one absence is to
be granted each man taking part.
In view of this situation it would
seem wise to put the time for the
Swing-out back to the original day.
There is no particular reason why
this should not be done. The reason
given for the alteration was that this
would accommodate many men who
are leaving the University before that
date. Men are leaving daily, however,
and those who have been called to
training camps are required to report
by May 14 at the latest. Hence it
would appear that they would be un-
able to attend the Swing-out exercises
under any circumstances.
Sunday is Mothers' Day.
If they try to hold Straw Hat day,
May 15, this year we will be surprised.
The lits are to have only one "bolt"
from drill. One is enough.
The word "slacker" might in time
be worn out.

What are you going to do if you
don't get an order to Fort Sheridan?
Spanish Students Invied to Meeting
All members of El Ateneo Espanol
Cervantes, and other ,students enroll-
ed in Spanish courses are invited to
attend a meeting to be held at 8°
o'clock tomorrow night in Lane hall.
A novel and interesting program has
been arranged by Mr. Gurrola. a

PROF. H. C. SADLER TELLS HOW
STUDENTS CAN JOIN IN MOST
IMMEDIATE HELP
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
A good many students are at pres-
ent wondering how they can best "do
their bit" for the country during the
next few months. While some may
have decided to work on the farm
owing to their lack of knowledge of
any other trade or profession, I would,
like to call attention to another field
of labor which is urgently in need of
men at the present time.
It is perhaps generally known that
the submarine campaign is making
serious inroads into the merchant
.hipping of the world, and the most
immediate way in which the United
States can help at the present time, is
in the building of ships to carry sup-
plie. to our allies.
An intensive production along this
line is already under way, and ar-
rangements are being made to increase
it. The shipyards, both wood and steel,
will need all the men they can get,
and any good, robust man, who is not
afraid of work, can get a job as helper,
even if he does not know anything
about shipbuilding. Already some of
our lake shipyards have intimated that
they can use student help during the
summer, and the same is true of the
coast yards.
I would suggest therefore, that those
of our students who have not already
arranged for work during the summer,
*hould look into this field before de-
ciding.
PROF. H. C. SADLER.
A, A.1, SCHUPP DECLINES
ENGI)NEER CANDIDATE FOR UNION
PRESIDENCY WILL NOT RETURN
NEXT YEAR.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Owing to the fact that I will not
be in the University next year, I
respectfully decline the nomination
from president of the Michigan Union.
ARTHUR SCHUPP.

:111liii 1111111illlilll 11111il1 illillill1111tii filpiiiiliuiiit1111 111tlfllliliilllIll'-
r INT GOD]'S OVT OF DOO]RS
Got Your Rscreaetionl O.ut of
r -
1TEN N~kIS m BASEBALL G 6OLF
Our Stock Is comrplfete and
Prices Right
VNIVER.SITY BOOKSTORES
:'t111111t11tlltl p11tsi ll ll llitlll ltlgll lli tftl llill lllllit llllll ll ll lltlllUlla

" 21"

Sanitary
Dry Cizaning Co.
514 E. WILLIAM ST.
Suits
Made to Measure
$15 and up
Phone 2225

IJUARRY DRUG CO'S.
Prescription Store
Cor. sRate & N. University

I

PLAI N

1[ntercotcf ate

Rubber
Bathing Caps

IP SUEY

40c & 50c
at

- 30c

FRIED RICE, (plain), 250
At All Times
Everyday have Fresh Home-
ade Hot Rolls served here-2
oils and Butter-5c.
Open 11 A. M. to 1 A. M.

e

Oregon: Many girls of the Univer.
sity of Oregon have enrolled in the
preparedness classes organized for the
women who wish to answer the call
to the flag. Regular drills and Red
Cross lectures constitute the work.
Indiana: All resources of the Una.
versity of Indiana have been offered.
to the government for use in the pre-
paredness campaign. The campus has
been offered for a parade ground, the
gymnasium for an armory, the grounds
for potato fields, and all laboratories
and equipment for research. The
number of students enlisted in the
training corps is 454.1
Ohio: Aviation will be taught at
Ohio State university as the result of
a decision reached by the war depart-
ment to establish aviators' schools in
six universities. Illinois, California,
Texas, Cornell, and Massachusetts In-
stitute, of Technology are the other
universities selected.
Brown: One hundred and fifty stu-
dents have applied for permission to
take up farm work. Only six petitions
have beer sacted upon at present.
Iowa: A $125,000 armory will be
constructed at the University of Iowa
as soon as the exact site can be de-
termined upon. The building will be
for the use of the training corps.
Illinois:. Tile ambulance unit organ-
ized at the university will sail for the
fields of France May 19 and prelim-
inary arrangements for passports have
been made. Chicago citizens were
asked to contribute to the fund.
Harvard: Alumni have offered to
pay the expenses of needy students
who wish to enroll in the training
camp to be held at Cambridge this
summer. Intensive training was be-
gun Monday.
Columbia: Three hundred and
fifty alumni of Columbia university
took a "hike" under the direction of
Major Cochran of the reserve officers'
training corps. The meals of the
alumni squad were cooked by their
own men and all work was done in
the exact manner required in the
army.
Cornell: Inspection of the 1,300
men comprising the four battalions of
Cornell's drill corps was held last
week-end. Capt. E. D. Powers of the
coast artillery acted as inspecting of-
ficer.

The following reported for work at
the intelligence bureau at the Michi-
gan Union yesterday afternoon:
Hope Fisher, grad.
Sue Verlenden, '20.
Gertrude Brock, '18.
Katherine Remington, '17.
Frances Way, '17.
Marion H-olden, '18.
Helen Hughes, '19.
Marie Paulus, '18.
Henryetta Brandebury, '18.
Marjorie Van Zandt, '19.
Anna Smith, '18.
Anna Kirkpatrick, '20.
Marion Treadgold, '20.
Frances Wesley, '20.
Julia Renwick, '17.
Elizabeth Arthur, '17.
Ruth Ely, '19.
Freda Garrett, '18.
Zilpha Pallister, '18.
Marian Wilson, '18.
Mildred Mighell, '18.
CO-MOPOLITAN CLUB MOUNTS
SNAPSHOTS OF VACATION TRIP
Will Enlarge Collection of Views Each
Year; Album is on Ex-
hibit
A recent innovation among the per-
manent possessions of the Cosmopoli-
tan club 'is now on exhibit in the win-
dow of the Kodak Florist, in Nickels
arcade. It consisits of an accumula-
tive snapshot album which has in its
first pages more than 80 of the best
snapshots that were taken , by the
members of the club during their
spring vacation trip.
The films were collected by Carlos
Loqez, '17E, and arrangements were
made by him to have the pictures
mounted in a book for the club. The
collection will be enlarged each year
as more pictures of things of particu-
lar interest to the club are taken.
Arrangements have been made*so
that any member of the club can se-
cure copies of any or all of the pic-
tures at a 20 per cent discount from
the regular price if he orders them be-
fore the end of next week, when the
films will be returned to their own-
ers. The Kodak Florist has donated
the album and mounted the pictures
in it for the club free of charge.
PHA RMACEUTICAL STUDENTS
TO GO TO DETROIT FRIDAY
Pharmaceutical students will take a
trip to Detroit Friday, May 11, where
they will inspect the laboratories of
Parke, Davis & Co.
Definite plans provide for departure
at 9:30 o'clock from the Michigan Cen-
tral station. Lunch will be served at
11:30 o'clock at the Parke, Davis plant
and the afternoon will be spent in vis-
iting the laboratories. A banquet will
follow in the evening at Hotel Statler.
PROF. CALLAN OF WISCONSIN
CONSULTS WITH PROF. BURSLEY
Prof. J. G. Callan of the steam and
engineering department of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin spent Monday
in this city in conference with Prof.
J. A. Bursley on the stores and store
keeping courses which are being of-
fered in the engineering college, with
the purpose of planning similar work
for the University of Wisconsin.
Madison Holds Recruiting Record
Madison, Wis., May 8.-The Madison
recruiting station has made a better
record for enlistments than any other
station in the western army division.
Most of the recruits have been stu-
dents of the University of Wisconsin.

A. J. RUBY
Inc.

Footwear

of

Quality and
Distinction

Nickels Arcade
795-J

Ii

j ..

"Where only
the best
is good
enough."

P,

PAM

...........

WE GUARANTEE
$300.00
to college students for a full
summer's work. For full infor-
mation write
THE NATIONAL MAP CO.
Indianapolis, Indiana

higan Inn 611 E.
Telephone 948-R

Liberty

' ===

Wormen
Stylus will meet tonight with Lucile
uarry, '18, 1746 Washtenaw avenue,
nstead of last night, as announced.
Geneva club will meet tonight at the
elta Delta Delta house.
Dean Myra B. Jordan will give knit-
ng lessons at 3 o'clock this afternoon
n Newberry hall.
Second round of the tennis tourna-
tent must be played off by Friday
ight.
The final match of the fall tennis
)urnament will be played at 3 o'clock
his afternoon on the Newberry courts.
Work by the intelligence bureau at
he Michigan Union will be carried on
torning and afternoon this week. In
he morning the questionnaires can be
ecured at the desk in the office. Other
taterial will be found on the tables
i the dance hall.
A second shipment of yarn to be
sed in knitting for the naval reserves

has been received by Miss Alice Evans
and will be sold at 60 cents a skein
as before.
CONGREGATIONAL STUDENTS
TO SHOW 2917 UNIVERSITY
Courses in mathematics, music,
journalism, and psychology will be of-
fered in the curriculum of a model
college during the year 2917. The un-
iversity of the future will open its
doors for the first, and perhaps the
last time at 8 o'clock Friday evening,
in the parlors of the Congregational
church. Members of the church and
their friends will enact the parts of
faculty and students, and diplomas
will be presented to those of the latter
successfully passing the course.
Store your typewriter at less than
transportation charges or have it pro-
perly packed and avoid breakage. O.
D. Morrill, 322 South State St.-Adv.tf
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Paekard Academy. IN

COMPRESSES AND BANDAGES
MADE BY WOMEN'S LEAGUE
Two boxes, each containing 1,152
compresses are ready to be sent to the
American ambulance corps in Paris,
as a result of the work done by the
Women's league at their weekly meet
ing on Tuesdays in Barbour gymnas
ium.
In addition to these, there are read
to be packed 70 dozen roller bandage,
48 dozen four-tailed bandages, 43
dozen sponges, and .34 dozen small
sized compresses.-
REP CROSS NEEDS DONATIONS
TO PROVIDE SEWING KITS
Under the direction of the local
branch of the Red Cross, sewing kits
for every man who leaves Ann Arbor
for some branch of government serv-
ice are being prepared by the women
of the city and University.
As the making of the outfits is large-
ly machine work, the need for volun-
teer helpers is not great, but money
for materials is in demand. Each kit
costs at least 50 cents and donations
for them are much appreciated by the
women in charge of the effort.
Notary Public. 0. D. Morrill, 322
South State.-Adv. tf

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