100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 09, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR--CONTINUJED
COOL TODAY

g lflk4Wn

DIatll

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
IWIRE SE RVICE

'I

VOL. XXVII. No. 154. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENTS

LIT STUDENTS TO
RECEIVE ONE HOUR
CREDIT FOR DRILL

WILL HOLD NINE PERIODS
TWO HOURS EACH BE-
FORE EXAMS

OF

ONE
Is
Work

BOLTED DRILL
LIMIT ALLOWED

on Ferry Field Every
and Thursday Starts
This Week

Monday

As a means of co-ordinating the
voluntary drill squads now at work
and as an incentive to a greater num-
ber of men to drill, one hour credit
will be given to all members of the
literary college who enroll in the bat-
talion now being formed in that de-
partment. Such was the decision of
the literary faculty as explained at
the meeting of- the seniors and juniors
at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon in
University Hall.
Drill Four Hours a Week
The work will consist of four hours
of drill a week; on Mondays and
Thursdays from 4 o'clock until 6
o'clock. This means that there will
be nine drill periods, in the next four
weeks up to examinations, actual work
starting this Thursday, each of two
hours' duration and starting at 4
o'clock. This drill is open to any
member of the literary college whether
he be drilling in a voluntary squad
or not. In order to gain the one hour
credit, however, the individual must
join this battalion.
The ideal towards which this move-
ment is working is to combine all the
squads. in the literary college under
one head as has been done in the
Law school and the engineering col-
lege.
First Drill Tomorrow
Philip E. Bursley will have immedi-
ate control over the battalion as com-
mandant, while Major C. W. Castle
will have general supervision. Every-
one desirous of enrolling must do so
before 3:30 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon, as the first drill will be .held at
4 o'clock tomorrow.
4 One absence from the nine drill
periods will be excused. No credit
will be given if two absences are re-
corded, but the individual will be al-
lowed to drill, nevertheless. If more
than two periods are missed, drills
may no longer be attended.
Seniors and Juniors to Meet
Seniors will meet at 4 o'clock Thurs-
day in front of Memorial hall while
the juniors will assemble in front of
University hall. From there they will
march to Ferry field.
The organization to be established
at this time will be temporary and
will have no bearing on the system to
be adopted next fall. Officers will be
chosen from the men in the companies
and appointments will depend upon
the ability of the men as shown in
the drills.
Professor Jesse S. Reeves, who had
yesterday's meeting in charge, stated
that more than 200 men had been
granted their credits for this se-
mester's work to enable them to do
agricultural work and that an equal
number also had left to enter various
branches of the service. He em-
phasized the fact that those who re-
mained in school should not be con-
sidered "slackers," but that those who
did not avail themselves of this op-
portunity to aid their country might
well be considered as such.
Sophs and Fresh Hear Plan Today
Sophomores and freshmen will meet
at 5 o'clock this afternoon in Univer-
sity hall where the plan will be fully
outlined to them. All seniors and
juniors who did not attend yester-
day's meeting should attend. It is
urged that the members of the literary
college turn out en masse to back this
movement.
TO EXAMINE SOPH ENGINEERS
FOR OFFICERSHIPS THURSDA Y

WILL SHOW CAMP
AND BORDER VIEWS
National Guard Officer to Lecture
with Six Reels of Pictures
Tonight
Six reels of motion pictures depict-
ing life in the military training camps
at Grayling and Ludington and the
camps on the Mexican border will be
shown at Hill auditorium at 7 o'clock
tonight. Major M. J. Phillips of the
Michigan national guard will lecture
in connection on "Camp Activities."
These films give such a vivid im-
pression of camp life that the Can-
adian government employed Major
Phillips to show them inthe Canadian
training camps. Members of the en-
gineering faculty under whose aus-
pices they are being brought here, de-
clare they give a good idea of what
the life in the training camps, about
to be opened, will be. There will be
no admission charge.
ENGINEERS MOBILIZE FOR
WAR SMOKER TONIGHT
MAJOR CASTLE, MAJOR WARD,
PROF. H. S. SADLER ON
PROGRAM
Engineers will mobilize at the Union
at 7:30 o'clock tonight for their big
military smoker, at which speeches
will be made by Major C. W. Castle,
Major C. A. Ward of the board of army
engineers, and Prof. H. S. Sadler. A
number of vaudeville sketches will be
presented by engineering talent. There
also will be a big drive on food and
"smokes" requisitioned for the affair.
Major C. W. Castle will talk on the
relationship between volunteer drill
on the campus and actual field serv-
ice, and lessons that can be learned
in drill. Major C. A. Ward will dis-
cuss the different ways in which col-
lege men can be of service to the
country. Professor Sadler's address
will be about military engineering for
the benefit of the students in that
course.
"The Marsellaise" will be sung by
Carlos A. Zanelli, '17E, with several
other patriotic numbers. The Camp
Davis boys who made such a hit in
the Spotlight vaudeville will be on
hand with a program of songs. An-
other feature will be a Chilean skit
by H. M. Domboorajian, '17E, in which
native instruments will be used. Dean
DeButts, '18E, and R. D. Pfohl, '20,
will furnish music during intermis-
sions.
Large quantities of sandwiches of
all kinds, coffee, cigars, and cigarets
have been prepared by the commit-
tee. Donald Smith, '17E, will be in
charge of the smoker, which is given
by the Engineering society of the en-
gineering college.
ADELPHI COMPLETES PLANS
FOR ANNUAL SPRING OUTING
Final plans for the Adelphi outing
up the river were made at last night's
meeting of the house. The outing will
be held Tuesday evening, May 22.
The Adelphi-Jeffersonian cup de-
bate to be held Saturday night is a
crucial one in Adelphi history. It is
the final in this year's cup contests,
and should Adelphi win it will get
permanent possession of the cup.
Election of officers for next semes-
ter will take place Tuesday evening,
at the last regular meeting of the
year.

House "asses Bill to Increase Navy
Washington, May 8.-The house late
today passed an administration bill
increasing the navy from 93,000 to
150,000 men and the marine corps
from 17,400,to 30,000 men.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

I

BELGIAN PLIGHT IS
TOLD TO CAMPUS
People Grieve at Recall of American
Minister from Coun-
try
MADAME DUPRIEZ RECOUNTS
BUTCHERY SHE WITNESSED
"Michigan Has Heard the Plea for
Belgium," States President
Hutchins
Hill auditorium, crowded from first
floor to second balcony last night sat
in hushed silence, while it thrilled
to the earnest words of Madame Du-
priez, witness to the horrible scenes
of devastation that marked the entry
of the German army into the defense-
less land of Belgium.
Madame Dupriez had no set Apeech.
She told the little stories of those
whom she had known and loved, spoke
of their dauntless courage; of the fate-
ful entry into Louvain, and the butch-
ery of its peaceful citizens.
Future of Belgium Rulned
"You may give us back our homes
and country," she said, and her voice
trembled. "You may rebuild our fac-
tories and our workshops, but our
children-our children who are dying
by the hundreds from lack of food and
shelter-you can never bring them
back to us. And Belgium will never
be Belgium again with the people of
the future taken from us." The lantern
slides which were used, served to em-
phasize the destruction that had come
to Belgium.
In an interview, she said, when the
American minister still resided in Bel-
glum, we had a sense of pece and
security. But when he was recalled,
the people lined the streets, silent and
uncovered to bid him farewell.
Duration of War Uncertain
When asked concerning the prob-
able length of the war, Madame Du-
priez asserted that no guess might
be hazarded. The German army is now
one-fifth again as strong as it was at
the opening of the war. Several hun-
dred thousand men come into the army
each year, and the deportation of the
Belgians has left German farmers and
mechanics free to enter the ranks.
"Michigan has heard the plea for
Belgium," said President Itarry B.
Hutchins at the close of the address,
"and Michigan will answer."
Governor Albert E. Sleeper, w°o was
to have presided at the meetiri , was
prevented at the last moment fiaom at-
tending.
A silken flag, given to the ambu-
lance unit by the women of the Un!-
versity, was presented by Anna L.
Lloyd, '18, and was received by Ralph
W. Starrett, '20E. French and.Ameri-
can national songs were given a spir-
ited rendering by the University band.
Members of the naval reserves, the
ambulance corps, and other .niltary
ery its peaceful citizens.
place in the audience.
l Change Cap Night Program
A. S. Hart, '17, told the audience
of the Student council's plan to in-
troduce a modification of the usual Cap
Night program. All freshman caps,
and the toques of all other classes will
t be tossed into huge boxes and baskets
this year, and will be preserved to be
turned over to the Belgian relief com-
missions.
Sophomore Prom Will be Informal

Owing to the numerous inquiries
concerning the exact nature of the
soph prom on Friday night, May 11,
l at the Armory, the committee in
charge announced emphatically yes-
terday that the prom would be inform-
al. As is customary, sport coats and,
white trousers will constitute the dress
of the male guests. There will be nc
flowers.
J-Lits to Elect Councilman Today
* In order to elect a Student council-
* man, members of the junior literary,
* class will meet at 4 o'clock this after-
* noon in- room 101 Economics building.
* Other important business will be
* transacted.
SH. J. Howk, '07M, Passes Through City
* Dr. H. J, Hoawk, '07M, of Mt. Gregor,
N. Y., director of the Metropolitan
* Life Insurance company's sanitarium,
was in the city yesterday on his way
to attend the congress on tuberculosis
* at Cincinnati.

I

INTERNED GERMANS
TO WORK ON FARMS
Government Puts 1,800 Teuton Officers
and Crew Members at Cultl-
vating 00-Acre Tract
Washington, May 8.-The 1,800 Ger-
man officers and crews of the in-
terned German ships at Boston, Phila-
delphia and New Orleans are to be
permanently interned on a 500-acre
tract between Asheville and Hender-
sonville, N. C., Secretary of Labor
Wilson announced today.
The men together with 1,200 enemy
aliens now held at immigration sta-
tions, will be put to work cultivating
200 acres of the tracts. While doing
this government work the men will
receive the pay of soldiers.
FIRST FRENCH LOAN
U. S. Loans Country $100,000,000 as
First Share of War Chest
Washington, May 8.-A loan of $100,-
000,000 was made today to France.
This is the first French share in the
five billion dollar war chest. Secre-
tary McAdoo turned over a treasury
warrant for the sum to French Am-
bassador Jusserand and received in
return the obligation of the French
government for the sum.
200 DISCHARGED MINNESOTA
GUARDSMEN WANT THEIR PAY
St. Paul, Minn., May 8.-Shouting
"we want our pay,", 200 discharged
guardsmen of the First Minnesota
field artillery stormed the state house
and demanded to see Governor Burn-
quist here this afternoon. The men
were met at the door of the state house
by sentries who refused to admit them
after their leaders explained that they
wanted to present their complaint to
the governor.
REVOLUTION IN BOLIVIA
Bulletin
Buenos Aires, May 8.-A revolution
has broken out in Bolivia. Dr. Es-
galia, defeated candidate for president,
has fled to Argentina.
No detailed information was avail-
able at a late hour last night.

1alfour Predicts
Ultimate Triumph
Head of British Commission Makes
Stirring Speech Before
Senate
Washington, May 8. - Solemnly
warning the United States of the
danger in the submarine menace
Arthur James Balfour, head of the
British commission, today told the
United States senate that this danger
and others equally great will be over-
come eventually and that the "cause
of justice and right will prevail in
the world."
Deeply moved by the warm demon-
stration accorded him, the British
statesman groped hesitatingly for ex-
pression. He spoke of the trials and
blunders of England in the first two
and one-half years of the war and
said: "With fine faith in the future
it will nevertheless require every man
and woman in this country to throw
their efforts into the scale of justice
and right. This already is being done
-will be done further and further-
and eventually success will crown our
efforts."
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB WILL
ELECT OFFICERS TOMORROW
Next year's officers of the Cosmo-
politan club will be elected at a meet-
ing to be held at 7 o'clock tomorrow
evening in room 301 University hall.
The following men were nominated at
a meeting held last night:
President, H. G. King, '17, and S.
Katsuizumi, '17; student members of
the board of directors, F. C. Liu, '18,
K. Ritscher, eng. spec., A. M. Elkind,
'20E, F. E. Jagodzinski, '18E, C. G.
Lopez, '17E, and A. R. Melcher, '18;
faculty members of the board of di-
rectors, Prof. J. A. C. Hildner, Prof.
J. R. NlAson, ?d Prof. .T. R. Br,;, m,;
members at large of the board of di-
rectors, Mr. N. C. Fetter, Mr. N. S.
Allen, and the Rev. Lloyd Douglas.
Flour Goes to $15 Per Barrel -
Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 8.-
Best grades of flour jumped 40 cents
a barrel yesterday, reaching $15.

POOL
TO

BILLION DOLLARS
WANTED TO BUILD
MERCHANT FLEET
ADMINISTRATION TO ASK CON-
GRESS FOR GIGANTIC
APPROPRIATION

Products of Steel, Coal, and Iron Com.
panies to Be Taken Over to
Speed Ship Program
Washington, May 8.-The adminis-
tration will ask congress for a billion
dollar appropriation to build steel and
wooden merchant ships it was learned
today.
The entire power of the government
and the resources of the nation are
to be concentrated in a gigantic build-
ing program to thwart the kaiser's
U-boats. Every item of the program
of the shipping board and the admin-
istration will be pushed to the limit.
It is hoped that the appropriation will
be given within a week.
Take Over Products of Industries
Products of the steel, coal. and iron
companies of the- country in so far as
they are necessary will be taken over
by the government to speed the great
building program. Work on private
contracts will be stopped. Those hold-
ing contracts for private supply will
be recompensed.
Will Pay Damages
An apprisement board is to be or-
ganized to pay a fair amount of dam-
ages to individuals and corporations
where private work is stopped and
the products of plants taken over. All
of the steel plants of the country will
be speeded up in the government work.
Supplies for bridge building, for steel
skyscrapers and in the making of
small steel contracts' will be halted
and all of the available plants turned
to ship work.

- - - - --

ALL RESOURCES
THWART U-BOATS

i

Nominees for Union and.
Athletic Aanagerships
The following men, nominees for the Union, will be voted upon
Friday, May 11, the regular campus election day:
PRESIDENT-Glenn M. Coulter, '18L, C. W. Fischer, '18, J. D. Hib-
bard, '1SE, A. A. Schupp, '17E.
RECORDING SECRETARY-C. C. Andrews, '18, H. E. Braun, '19L9
H. C. L. Jackson, '18, R. T. McDonald, '18, R. R. Winslow, '19L.
LITERARY VICE-PRESIDENTA. 0. Gabriel, '18, A. G. Ippel, '18, C.
W. Neumann, '18, R. C. Patterson, '18, E. Wunsch, '18.
ENGINEERING VICE-PRESIDENT -S. S. Attwood, '18E, H. W. Col.
lins, '18E, W. S. Dinwiddie, '18E, E. G. Dudley, '18E, W. M. Mc-
Kee, '18E.
LAW VICE-PRESIDENT-G. F. Hurley, '18L, L. E. Joslyn, 1191, W.
D. Nance, '19L, G. L. Ohrstrom, '19L.4
MEDICAL VICE-PRESIDENT-J. R. Darnall, '18M, R. M. McKean,
'18M, T. L. Tolan, 118M.
COMBINED DEPARTMENTS 'ICE-PRESIDENT - D. L. Mitchell,
'18D, J. L. Powers, '18P.
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES FOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS -
Dean Henry M. Bates, Prof. William A. Frayer, Dr. Reuben
Peterson.
The following nen, nominees for athletic managerships, will be
voted upon Friday, May 11, the regular campus election day:
FOOTBALL MANAGERS-Chas. F. Boos, '18, Leland N. Scofield, '19L.
ASSISTANT MANAGERS-DeeForest W. Buckmaster, '19, John D.
Cameron, '19, Alfred Mason, '19, Donald M. Springer, '19E, Robert
L. Storrer, '19E, Harlon N. Walker, '19, William D. Craig, '19,
Matthew S. Towar, '19.
BASEBALL MANAGERS-Stephen G. Pratt, '18E, Jasper B. Reid, '18.
ASSISTANT MANAGERS-Ferdinand C. Bell, '19, Clark Bishop, '19,
Robert Daugherty, '19, Sherman Fitzsimons, '19E, Austin Har-
mon. '19, Frederick B. Lyons, '19, Donald Yerkes, '19, Arthur E.
Zigler, ,19.
TRACK MANAGED-Eldridge Dudley, '18E, Frederick J. Thieme,'18E.
ASSISTANT MANAGER-J. C. Finn, '19, F. S. Sanders,'19E, James H.
Clarke, '19, P. 0. Avery, '19, G. B. Pearson, '19, L. L. Matthews,
'19, Carl Rash, '19, Harry Cosset, '19.
INTEBCOLLEGE MANAGER-Arthur T. Heuer,.. '18, Carl Neu-
mann, '18.
ASSISTANT MANAGER-John D. Watts, '18 George Codd, '20, Harry
M. Carey, '19.N
The following men, campus at large nominees for the Student
council, will be voted upon Fri-day, May 11, at the regular campus
election day:
Chester W. Clark, '18, Robert T. McDonald, '18, Clarence A. Hirt,
'18E, Alan V. Livingston, '18E, Rollin I. Winslow, '191, and
Ernest L. Zeigler, '19L.
1918 MEDICS-E. C. Baumgarten, C. A. Bosworth.
1918 PRARMICS--E. I. Crandall, H. B. McWilliams.
1918 HOMOEOPS-L. J. Boyd, Edward C. Stebbins, C. S. Emery.

TIIN KS U. S. WILL BE ABLE
TO SOLVE U-BOAT PROBLEM
Washington, May 8.-Secretary of
State Lansing, who a few days ago
was pessimistic over the submarine
situation, expressed the view yester-
day that the United States will be able
to overcome the U-boat menace. Pres-
sed for an answer as to whether his
statement was based on certain know-
ledge or was simply prophetic the
secretary admitted that it was largely
prophetic.
Arrested for Treasonable Remarks
Cedar ,Rapids, Iowa, May 8.-Albert
Lee Roberts of Kansas City, Missouri,
was taken into custody here yester-
day by federal authorities for making
alleged treasonable remarks against
President Wilson. Roberts was later
released to await further action by
the justice department at -Washington.
George A. Donohue of Davenport,
Iowa, caused his arrest, declaring he
overheard Roberts refer to "that jelly
fish down at Washington who is
directed by Tumulty, who wears 'a
cross and does as the Pope says."
Students Discuss Church Tonight
"The Catholic Church and Eugenics"
will be the subject for discussion at
the meeting tonight of the Catholic
Students' Study club. The speaker
will be the Rev. Fr. Burke of St.
Thomas' church. The meeting will
be held at 7:30 o'clock in the Knights
of Columbus parlors at the corner of
Huron and Division streets.
Dr. Warthin Speaks In Illinois Today
Dr. Aldred S. Warthin of the med-
ical department will address the Il-
linois State Medical society at its an-
nual meeting which will be held to-
day in Bloomington. Dr. Warthin has
also been procured to deliver a series
of lectures on hygiene to the boys of
the Toledo high schools during May.
Soph Lits to Elect Assistant Treasurer
An assistant treasurer will be elect-
ed and nominees for Student council-
man will be chosen at the meeting of
the soph lies to be held at 4,o'clock
Thursday afternoon in room 101 Eco-
nomics building. The councilman will
be elected at the campus elections Fri-
day.

*

URGE SENIORS TO ORDER
CAPS AND GOWNS AT ONCE

All soph engineers wishing to try
out for commissioned and non-com-
missioned officerships in the soph eng-
ineer battalion will be given an ex-
amination at 7 o'clock Thursday in
room 268 Engineering building. All
applicants must be prepared to be
questioned on the school of the soldier
and the school of the company.

*
* Seniors in all colleges are
* strongly urged to make arrange-
* ments with the local merchants
* for their caps and gowns immedi-
* ately. With the date for Swing-
* out advanced to Monday, May 14,
* local merchants are confronted
* with a difficult problem in at-
* tempting to meet the delayed or-
* ders for caps and gowns which
* they must furnish at an earlier
* date than they had planned upon.
* Committee in Charge.
L* * * * * * * * * * * * *

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan